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There are countless examples in B2B, especially within saas and software in general. But what about premium/luxury consumer brands? Can anyone cite any known examples and/or case studies?

  • RB

    Robert Bausmert

    3 months ago #

    What kind of B2C companies are you looking for? Facebook and Twitter would be some examples.
    Since you are talking about luxury brands I assume you mean ecommerce? I remember there was an AMA a while ago with the head of growth of a fashion brand here on growthhackers, dont remember the company name though.
    Growth Hacking is not about B2B or B2C. At its core, it is about understanding what keeps your users from taking a desired action and using your understanding to test things that can lead to more people taking that action.

    • CG

      Chris Guest

      3 months ago #

      Thanks Robert. Good question.

      By "premium" brand in this context, I mean a consumer facing brand that differentiates itself from "mainstream" products in its category by virtue of a higher quality product or more desirable brand, and is able to charge "a premium" (be more expensive) because of it.

      So a premium brand would be something like Tesla, Audi or Mercedes to cars, Rapha to cycling, Hugo Boss to fashion, St Regis to hotels and so on. The brand doesn't need to be "Luxury" (which I'd consider to mean extra superfluous perks) such as Rolls-Royce, Gucci or Rolex, but I am interested to talk about brands that have a brands that have a value beyond the tangible value of the product alone.

      I agree that Growth Hacking should apply to B2B or B2C equally, but the reason I'm interested to discuss this, is that virtually every case study I see is B2B, and more often than not, focussed on SaaS products.

      Thanks!

      • RB

        Robert Bausmert

        3 months ago #

        I think it's a matter of how you define the term, but the idea growth hacking is based on can definitely be applied to premium brands too.

        But if you have little or incomplete data (because much of the interaction happens offline and is harder to track for example) and a low sample size (higher price usually results in few, but high profit sales compared to low price products) you have to rely more on gut feeling than hard data.

        That being said, there are few businesses nowadays that don't have an online presence. Even brands like for example Tesla can create an online presence to learn about the research their potential customers do before making a purchase. Once they understand where people drop off and why they drop off, the can form hypotheses on what can be improved.

      • RB

        Robert Bausmert

        3 months ago #

        I should add: Research can also be done offline. Tesla's sales people can ask potential customs questions that lead to specific insights they are looking for to improve their funnel. Based on the answers, Tesla can form hypotheses they can test.

  • JB

    Juan Bell

    3 months ago #

    To Robert's point I think it's all contingent on how you view "Growth Hacking". While I typically think of it in terms of online conversion in the digital space at its core I consider it the process of rapid experimentation and learning what works to achieve whatever business objectives you've outlined. As far as B2C there are plenty of companies Google, Twitter, FB, Amazon all fall into this category. As far as "premium brands" are concerned you could make the argument Tesla (the company you mentioned) falls into this category as well. They started off one product learned from their audience experimenting with changes and build better products over time. Here is an article about them testing out the new Model 3 https://seekingalpha.com/article/4103361-tesla-selling-beta-test-cars-employees-model-3-revenue-recognition-remains-joke

    • CG

      Chris Guest

      3 months ago #

      That's true. Tesla are such an exception to every other rule of the automotive industry (and I worked most of my career in that industry), that if wouldn't surprise me if they have a formal team and process for growth marketing.

  • CG

    Chris Guest

    3 months ago #

    Could it be that the lack of answers here IS the answer? Could it be that there are no examples to think of?

  • CG

    Chris Guest

    3 months ago #

    Let's rephrase the question in a more tangible and actionable way. We could all find dozens of case studies published about growth marketing success in B2B or software companies, but who can find and paste a link to a case study about growth marketing in a premium consumer brand?

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