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In a recently discussed Slideshare (http://growthhackers.com/the-marketing-technologist-neo-of-the-marketing-matrix-slideshare/), the author presents a Java developer's path to marketing technologist (aka growth hacker). As we know, this is just one path out of countless many. I thought it would be helpful to gather a collection of real-world scenarios by asking Growth Hackers and Aspiring Growth Hackers to share the path that led them to transform into the role of growth hacker.

As defined by Sean Ellis: "a growth hackers is a person whose true north is growth. Everything they do is scrutinized by its potential impact on scalable growth."

  • BP

    Brandon Pindulic

    almost 6 years ago #

    Hi Rachel,

    I wouldn’t call myself a growth hacker just because I do not have any major wins under my belt (yet), but these past few months I have been building up my skill set, learning as much as I can relating to growth and more importantly, how to execute. Plus, I’ve had a number of interesting growth spurts that served as some confidence boosters.

    However, to answer your question, I’m constantly frustrated by expensive, boring and immeasurable marketing campaigns. I also realized how hard it is for a startup, or any business on a budget, to gain traction. As I started to become more and more interested in this stuff and learning things like user acquisition, analytics, etc. I was lead on to the term “growth hacking”. It just made a lot of sense to me, and combined creative marketing with efficiency with the ability to track exactly what is and is not working.

    The reason, in my opinion, the term growth hacking can get a bad rap is because too many people use it just for self-promotion. Also, a lot of people think that growth hacking can only be in the form of virality or piggy-backing off of major sources of traffic. While both of those examples can pay off in spades if done correctly, growth hacking is comprised of a ton of small wins, and not just a few examples such as the Hotmail or AirBnB & Craigslist hack.

    But overall, I’m still learning and I think it’s a necessary skill to have if you’re looking to grow a startup. I think I’ve stuck with it so long because there’s always something to learn and you have to stay ahead, so it’s far from routine.

    • RE

      Rachel Ergo

      almost 6 years ago #

      Thanks for sharing, Brandon. I can relate to your frustration with wasteful and/or immeasurable campaigns. I also think it's fair to say there's always something new to learn - no ultimate mastery only continual growth. These are exciting times to say the least :)

  • DM

    Dave Marcello

    almost 6 years ago #

    Good topic here. Like Brandon, also an Aspiring GH. I came from a relatively traditional marketing background, at a lifestyle marketing agency with blue chip brands for clients for a decade. Along the way, I taught myself all about word of mouth marketing, then started freelancing and consulting with small businesses on the side. That turned into my full time job. A result of working mostly with small budgets and courageous people, my opportunity to shine came at a cross-section of creativity and analytics. Come to find out, my mind is very much wired that way (I was always the guy caught in the middle of those Myers Briggs type tests.) Now I'm co-founder of a startup and consulting with other startups, really working on my GH skills. It's an extremely exciting time.

    • RE

      Rachel Ergo

      almost 6 years ago #

      Thanks Dave! "I was always the guy caught in the middle of those Myers Briggs type tests" - it would be interesting to know if other growth hackers share the same results. I've had this happen many times too.

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