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I've been hearing a ton of success stories from individuals using Reddit and am curious how the GH community is using it for their work. I'd love to hear any of the following: -What Subreddits do you follow & why? -What's your favorite marketing hack that's used Reddit? -If you're an active user (you comment & add content), why do you do this? -Any odd tips or tricks to use -(And if you have 1 more minute, as a guilty pleasure, share the best Upvote gif you've seen on Reddit)

  • SM

    Stuart McKeown

    about 5 years ago #

    Reddit is an interesting community, I love the site and I love that they are quite blunt when it comes to blatant spamming.

    A lot of the marketing subreddits (like /r/startups/) are full of blogspam and they really don't tend to get much traction.

    The types of stuff that works well there is being personal and telling a good story + really giving value to the community. They love stories about how you got started, what tactics you're using, and also drilling into the metrics/financials. There's a lot of "me too" types on Reddit, that just want to try & replicate the success of others.

    We've had 2 customers in particular do a great job at this (and mention us along the way).

    Beardbrand: http://www.reddit.com/r/Entrepreneur/comments/1ry69y/beardbrand_75k_november_updates_for_our_crazy/

    Wet Shave Club: http://www.reddit.com/r/Entrepreneur/comments/2h1mlt/the_inner_workings_of_a_subscription_box_company/

    So yeah, I think there's a lot to be said about fostering these sorts of relationships with customers, giving them a personal touch and encouraging them to tell their story. I guess it's why a lot of people say that customer success is one of the best ways to grow your own business (and is ours).

    • JQ

      Jason Quey

      about 5 years ago #

      Definitely agree @thegyppo of the need to be genuine and honest.

      Another couple things:
      1. Reddit can be a huge driver of traffic. Although most of my posts for our startup haven't had the largest amounts of upvotes, 23% of my traffic comes from Reddit.

      The challenge is to keep providing value without seeming spammy. You can only do so many AMAs, case studies, etc.

      /u/bandholz has done a spectacular job of this for Beardbrand, mainly on /r/beards or /r/malehairadvice, but occasionally hopping over to give great case studies/success stories on /r/entrepreneur.

      2. Many redditors loved to help. I've conneceted to a half dozen or so on Skype to get some of the best feedback. I believe this is because reddit helps encourage an environment of generosity.

      3. Without even trying for this, I've had three side gigs come from my posts, two from my eBay AMA: https://www.reddit.com/r/Entrepreneur/comments/2hsnxy/iama_ebay_entrepreneur_i_started_at_the_end_of/

      My suggestions:
      1. Find 3 engaging, relevant communities between 10k-150k.
      2. Try to get 10 net upvotes in that community before doing a self-post. Most won't remember you, but this gets you familiar with that sub-reddit culture and giving your account some validity first.
      3. Use www.redditlater.com/analysis to get an idea when best to post (data isn't too great at the beginning of the month as it resets on the 1st).

    • BW

      Brand Winnie

      about 5 years ago #

      Awesome feedback Stuart!

    • PL

      Pavelas Laptevas

      about 5 years ago #

      Thank you for those reddit links, was a great read!

    • LS

      Logan Stoneman

      about 5 years ago #

      Awesome reads @thegyppo - Is there anything you think reddit does with their uber-engaged community that we could do here on GH?

      • SM

        Stuart McKeown

        about 5 years ago #

        I think people on Reddit share more about what they are working on and their successes, and also ask more for feedback. Whereas here we tend to share more industry related stuff (and your own stuff is frowned upon - because it may possibly be spammy).

  • JB

    Jas Banwait

    about 5 years ago #

    What I learned, is essentially you gotta love reddit to use reddit for growth. If you hate it or feel like an outsider, then it will be hard to get in because you'll stick out like a sore thumb.

    You basically have to build up your karma score so and genuinely post in subreddits with relevant posts BEFORE you start marketing or mentioning your own agenda..

    It's definitely do-able, just have to be in to it.

    • HW

      Hannah Wright

      about 5 years ago #

      Couldn't agree more with this.

      Common conversation:

      "I've tried promoting my product on reddit but it never seems to work out."

      "Really? How long have you been hanging out on reddit?"

      "I just joined but have known about it for awhile."

      And therein lies the problem.

      You have to be a part of a community in order to understand it.

    • SB

      Siddharth Bharath

      about 5 years ago #

      Exactly. You can't just jump on Reddit one fine day and post your stuff. The community hates it if you use just the forums to promote your own agenda. Even a free eBook or free product will get downvoted if you haven't built up karma.

  • JB

    jon Bishop

    about 5 years ago #

    Similar to what Stuart is saying, I find Reddit to be a community you cannot bullshit. If they smell something is off they will track down evidence to the end of the earth. On the flipside, they are a very caring and engaged community to people they like / contribute properly to. So I would suggest that the biggest 'marketing hack' is to bring genuine value for that specific subreddit when you engage with it and try not to optimise towards clicks / over selling your product. For example, I have a startup so I engage in r/startup mainly answering questions about growth or anything else I can help with on there but my startup is about sports so I also engage on various sports subreddits talking specifically about sports. To add more value, I am trying to get my sports journalists on there to add value / answer questions. Sometimes the team lifts the copy straight out of the app and place it right in the subreddit for them to read so they don't have to go to the app. It seems counter intuitive but on Reddit, it's all about building up goodwill. You could see the benefits of this in Stuart's example with the Beard guys getting great reactions to their posts as they had built up goodwill with quality contributions before.

    It also helps if your company is geared for the user from start to finish. A great example of this is a company I actually subscribe to: Pact Coffee who I found out about via their brilliant paid ads campaign on Reddit (yes you can advertise on Reddit).

    The rundown of the campaign is here:
    http://www.socialmediatoday.com/content/how-small-coffee-company-totally-owned-reddit-promo

    But I always feel it worked so well because the same friendly, honest, customer-happiness-obsessed tone they adopt resonates throughout their touchpoints when you deal with them which gets you free publicity like this on Reddit:

    http://www.reddit.com/r/Coffee/comments/2rync4/pact_coffees_incredible_customer_service_needs/

    Favourite gif? If has to be otters chasing butterflies, the Internet almost exploded
    http://i.imgur.com/4nKQt3Q.gifv

    • LS

      Logan Stoneman

      about 5 years ago #

      @jonin60seconds that otter gif is the cure for any monday blues. thank you!

      Were you a Reddit user before you were building your startup or did you start using Reddit with an end goal of helping promote your work?

      • JB

        jon Bishop

        about 5 years ago #

        Been a Reddit user for years, contribute occasionally with both random/fun/personal stuff and professional stuff. I think it's the greatest community on the internet. There is something there for every random little interest I have. So yeah, interest / end goal was personal. Problem is now that I have attached my professional persona to it, I really have to go back in my history and delete anything dodgy!

  • PS

    Paul Shapiro

    about 5 years ago #

    Here was my run down about how to think about it
    http://searchwilderness.com/startups-should-be-on-reddit/

    • JQ

      Jason Quey

      about 5 years ago #

      Great write up Paul! Did not know about metareddit, that will save time from doing a bunch of manual searches.

      Another tool that could help is redditlater.com/analysis, which gives you an idea of best times to post for a given sub. Allows for one scheduled post a week too.

      Just shared it on my biz twitter account :).

  • NL

    Nick Lucs

    about 5 years ago #

    Reddit can be an interesting place. You can get eaten alive if you get "caught"

    On the side, I have a food blog highlighting the Des Moines food scene, food trends and recipes. So I like to follow the r/food.
    I had some success by just posting a photo on that subreddit (http://www.reddit.com/r/food/comments/2o632s/i_made_buddy_the_elfs_breakfast_spaghetti/) and ended up getting a pretty solid link back from amNY.com (http://www.amny.com/eat-and-drink/sweet-spaghetti-from-elf-is-real-1.9677046). I asked how she picked me up and she said she saw my image on Reddit. So, if you can create something trendy maybe don't put the link out there right away and see if pieces (images) of your content can get traction. If that happens you'll have people contacting you about your content that you've created.

    -I like to stay active so I'm not just a "poster". It's good to stay engaged because then you can hopefully get some comment karma and at least show that you're engaged with reddit.

    • NB

      Nick Berry

      about 5 years ago #

      Hey fellow Nick from Des Moines. I didn't even know about your blog! You're right on about the reddit community.

    • LS

      Logan Stoneman

      about 5 years ago #

      I love that strategy of of giving users a taste of your work in hopes that they'll search independently for the whole meal.

      And that spaghetti surprisingly looks good... so win win @nicklucs :) thanks for the comments!

      • NL

        Nick Lucs

        about 5 years ago #

        Thanks! :)

        Great question. I loved seeing what others had to say too.

  • AL

    Andrew Littlefield

    about 5 years ago #

    We're starting to experiment with using it to source content ideas by asking questions/spurring discussion.
    Our target customer is nonprofit workers, but /r/nonprofit is pretty slow and mostly filled with people wanting to start a nonprofit.
    So rather than try to get something out of nothing there, we've posted questions about the general public (ie - donor-perspective) about their experience with donating to nonprofits: why they do it, why they WOULDN'T do it. Then we can turn around and use those responses for content to share with our target customers to highlight do's and don't's of interacting with donors.

    • DD

      Dave DiGiovanni

      almost 5 years ago #

      This is a great way to use reddit. It is one of the most efficient ways to do customer research online.

  • JM

    Jack Meredith

    about 5 years ago #

    I thought this was a pretty comprehensive guide: http://www.nichepursuits.com/reddit-marketing/

    I think your'e just cutting corners with astroturfing and will probably get caught. Be helpful, be relevant. I haven't used them in a while, but I remember Reddit ads being dirt cheap.

  • DD

    Dave DiGiovanni

    almost 5 years ago #

    Lots of good comments here, so I'll just add a few things.

    1. **Monitor reddit using tools like [Karmalytics.co](http://karmalytics.co) or [TrackReddit.com](http://trackreddit.com)**. Track your brand name as well as specific key phrases that indicate someone might be talking about a problem your business solves. Only jump into the conversation if you can add value (e.g. answer a question or clear up confusion about something).

    2. **Get involved in the right subreddits**. A good reddit marketing strategy is really about getting to know your customers and becoming a member of your community. Find the subreddits that contain your audience and become a contributing member of the community. Learning about your customer can help you write better copy, create interesting content, and discover their real pain points.

    3. **Consider starting your own subreddit**. This is a great way to start a community of fans on the cheap. A subreddit is super easy to maintain and can be a simple way to get your fans talking to each other and you on a regular basis.

  • AF

    Angelina Fomina

    about 5 years ago #

    The biggest success that we found was from our customers posting about our product on Reddit. They write in a voice that is not meant to sell but just get the word out. Most of the subreddits where about programming, dev tools, data, etc. We make sure to follow up with everyone that posted about us and respond to every single comment on the thread. Usually saying "Hey, I'm the co-founder and can answer any of your questions or curiosity" works well.

    • LS

      Logan Stoneman

      about 5 years ago #

      @aafomina are your customers already using reddit and naturally speak about your product, or are you directing/hinting at them in some way to post about your product?

      • AF

        Angelina Fomina

        about 5 years ago #

        They are already using reddit and naturally speaking about it. We usually find out after a few hours of them posting. I think hinting/directing them to post about the product is a great idea. I have yet to find a smooth way to do that. If you build a close enough connect with a customer (someone that is buying your product) and can guess they are the type of person to use reddit (for example the largest Reddit demographic is 18 - 29 year old males) then instead of asking them to write a blog post about you or refer to friends you can ask them to post on reddit.

  • RA

    Ramin Assemi

    about 5 years ago #

    We're keeping an eye on reddit.com/r/sales (our product is a CRM for salespeople). We engage with helpful short comments, and add a link to one of our blog posts that provides a more in-depth answer.
    It's a very plain and basic strategy: it doesn't take a lot of time, and it doesn't generate a lot of results, but it's good enough to keep doing it, and it's yet another way of gathering content ideas. (And it's great when people use your content and succeed with it, I find that on reddit they often get back and tell you about it.)
    I also agree with @thegyppo @jdquey @jonin60seconds & others that the subreddits worth engaging in have zero tolerance for promotional BS.

  • RA

    Ramin Assemi

    about 5 years ago #

    We're keeping an eye on reddit.com/r/sales (our product is a CRM for salespeople). We engage with helpful short comments, and add a link to one of our blog posts that provides a more in-depth answer.
    It's a very plain and basic strategy: it doesn't take a lot of time, and it doesn't generate a lot of results, but it's good enough to keep doing it, and it's yet another way of gathering content ideas. (And it's great when people use your content and succeed with it, I find that on reddit they often get back and tell you about it.)
    I also agree with @thegyppo @jdquey @jonin60seconds & others that the subreddits worth engaging in have zero tolerance for promotional BS.

  • JE

    jonah engler

    almost 5 years ago #

    Reddit is a great monitoring resource.

  • SH

    steve harrry

    almost 5 years ago #

    I use Reddit as a growth hacking medium to generate viral traffic. I am glad that @thegyppo @jasbanwait shared some useful comments but there are other tricks that I use are

    1. Timing of posts submission.
    2. Posting researched and in-depth posts in any topic works well.
    3. Post variety of things on different sub-reddits [instead of always self-promotion]
    4. This one is really important, Before you post look up on how many people are active on the specific sub-reddit.
    5. Catchy title [Some redditors oppose link bait titles but still it works and worth to generate votes]
    6. Never try to spam the community.

  • VE

    Viktor En

    about 4 years ago #

    We're using Reddit to get clicks to our blog, and the subreddit we're active in is pretty receptive as long as we're delivering good content. We've done some opportunistic ads as well for next to nothing, and we've gotten traffic as low as $0.04 cpc. The conversion rate is not great though.

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