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I'm planning to launch an online product for women, and I'm looking for the best media outlets and blogs that could cover my product. Probably the main media outlets won't going to do that.

Maybe I should narrow the scope of my target, for example: moms that stay at home taking care of their sons.

What do you think?

  • MB

    Morgan Brown

    over 5 years ago #

    A couple of thoughts:

    1) Building a list of women-focused web properties is not incredibly challenging. The harder part is finding the right properties that will fit with your niche audience. Targeting women is a bad idea. Targeting professional women who like yoga who make more than 75K per year and own iphone 5's or higher is a much better target.

    2) Women who blog, share on social media, post on YouTube, etc. get BOMBARDED with requests to promote new products to their audiences. Literally, hundreds of requests a day. In order to get their attention you need to:

    a) make it clear that you are reaching out to them specifically because their site represents a great fit between their audience and your product. Blanket pitches don't work and can create backlash. Don't just blast a generic message. Show them you've read the site and have an angle.

    b) Don't ever call anyone a Mommy blogger, Mom blogger or blogger for that matter. Refer to them as an influencer, publisher, or by name. Never, ever Mommy blogger.

    c) Everyone thinks that bloggers love giveaways. Here's some free stuff to giveaway to your audience is always the pitch. Guess what? Doing a giveaway is a TON of work for the blogger. Bloggers get sick of them. For every giveaway they have to: Write the post, setup the sweepstakes software, setup the rules, promote the sweepstakes, pick the winner, track them down and then connect that person to you. Does that sound fun? No. It isn't. Don't expect bloggers to throw themselves at you for a giveaway.

    d) They expect to be paid for their time and audience. You should expect to pay for them to promote you. The bigger the site, the more you'll have to pay.

    e) Most bloggers work with big brands, and they also know that everyone wants something from them. So most of their rate cards are elevated. You can negotiate. You can also work in performance compensation with smaller blogs if they're up for it. Some of the most successful and cost-effective blogger programs I've done involve a small guarantee payment plus a performance lever on a CPA basis. Works wonders and protects you from downside of a blogger who can't deliver.

    f) Blogs aren't the only thing out there. Look for Facebook page admins, Instagram accounts, Twitter accounts and Pinterest power users as opportunities for sponsored promotion of whatever it is you're selling.

    g) Don't be a jerk. The female, especially mom, contingent of online influencers are well connected with one another and backchannel offers, mistakes and other issues to their networks. If you burn one blogger or treat them poorly or carelessly others will know about it, quickly.

  • SE

    Sean Ellis

    over 5 years ago #

    While it's not a women only website, I would definitely do lots of testing on Facebook targeting only women. Facebook offers very granular targeting, so I'm sure you can figure out something on Facebook that gets you pretty close to narrowing your target to moms that stay at home to take care of sons.

  • SM

    Stuart McKeown

    over 5 years ago #

    You may want to look at mechanics, for example we have a contest/giveaways platform & your target demographic is by far the most profilic in our space :)

    My advice would be, set aside 100 of your product. Partner with 100 separate blogs in the space to give it away to their audience.

    Send all entrants to a mailing list, then send out a consolation coupon code to anyone that didn't win. That way you build a list, plus drive preorders/revenue.

  • VV

    Visakan Veerasamy

    over 5 years ago #

    It really depends on the nature of your product, yup. Women aren't a single monolithic market (unless you're selling pads and tampons maybe, but I even those companies are remarkably differentiated). Flip it on its head- what outlets specifically target men? You'll find that all the good ones target a specific subset of men.

    So yup- if it's focused on stay-at-home moms, then there are some popular stay-at-home mom bloggers you should look for, etc.

  • BL

    Brandon Lipman

    about 5 years ago #

    Take a look at Blogher (blogher.com/) this s a big one. Predominantly female writers and often content is targeted to females.

    • CB

      Chelsea Baldwin

      about 5 years ago #

      I was just about to suggest BlogHer - you can advertise your product on blogs that have predominantly female audiences. :)

  • DF

    David Fallarme

    over 5 years ago #

    You ask this question to a room full of dudes? :)

    Sounds like you've already gotten a first cut of your target market, so... go ask them. As a start, find a mommy blogger and pick her brain. Be ready to pay for her time.

    • SE

      Sean Ellis

      over 5 years ago #

      Good point. I'm surprised some of the women in the community haven't chimed in on this. @nichole @bellastone @etang20 @stellabayles @beckyloveshugs any insights on best online media properties for reaching women overall or the specific vertical of moms of sons?

      • MB

        Morgan Brown

        over 5 years ago #

        @sean I think many womenwould avoid answering this question because the question is so broad as it comes across as almost asked without previous thought or consideration. When people make big generalizations like "how to target women" it almost suggests that they haven't spent a lot of time thinking about it from their own side.

        If the question was more specific, I imagine more people (not just women) would be more compelled to weigh in. That was my perception anyway.

        • SC

          Shana Carp

          over 5 years ago #

          ding! yeah, basically, I'm a person before I'm a lady. It would be weird for me to assume that you like sports because you're male. Maybe you don't like sports. Maybe I should learn about you.

          Also, why wouldn't a father of sons be interested in this product? Like I know fathers of sons, they care about their sons. Why would the moms care more?

        • SE

          Sean Ellis

          over 5 years ago #

          Agree @morgan , ideally someone understands their target customer on a much deeper level than just at the gender level. But picking the right segment often starts broad and then you work your way narrower based on feedback, product evangelism, usage, etc. Sometimes people over-target a very specific niche too early before they discover which segment has the biggest need for their product. At LogMeIn we believed we were building our product for less technical prosumers to access their computers remotely for work related activities. But it turned out that a very profitable segment were IT support professionals that were able to walk their less technical customers through the easy setup so they could provide remote support services. Through a fluke I didn't over position the product based on our assumed use case.

          Unfortunately @pmcpinto hasn't really participated in the conversation since asking the original question. So we don't know if he's still at the very early stage of figuring out his target customer, if he's decided that all women are his target customer or if he thinks his target customer is stay at home moms of boys (btw, really curious what product would be intended for that product). Hopefully he plans to whittle his target down a lot. As @shanac just suggested, even saying woman are his target might be too narrow focusing. Dads with sons might also be an important target. Trial and error and experimentation are a huge part of figuring that out.

          Regarding suggesting some women should participate in this conversation, it was more in response to GH being a "room full of dudes." GH is about marketing, growth levers, growth experiments, growth platforms, case studies... Everyone passionate about these topics is encouraged to participate. Not just in this conversation, but in all conversations.

    • SC

      Shana Carp

      over 5 years ago #

      last I checked I'm a lady

  • SL

    Sapph Li

    over 5 years ago #

    What product are you launching? I would target influential female bloggers. For example, check out http://nowmanifest.com/ - a network of the top fashion bloggers.

  • GJ

    Gareth James

    over 5 years ago #

    Mumsnet in the UK

  • ET

    Eva Tang

    over 5 years ago #

    To be honest, I would need more clarity into what the product is to identify where your channels are. If the online product is targeted specifically to women in tech (ie, myself) maybe look at Women 2.0 or someone who has a big following consisting of your ideal customers, ie. Sheryl Sandberg. Know your who really well before asking how and where.

  • LM

    Lynda Moss

    about 5 years ago #

    There are a few excellent resources on Slideshare that will with targeting and messaging women, which will help you narrow down to the most productive multimedia outlets to approach.

    Checkout: http://www.slideshare.net/alai17/the-world-of-womens-marketing.

    You're better off thinking in terms of individual womens' 'personas' rather than demographics. Get to know her as person, then you can connect much more intimately.

    Here's a few questions that you might want to ask:

    Personas detail questions to ask
    Role:

    What is your job role? Your job title?
    How is your job measured?
    What is a typical day?
    What skills are required?
    What knowledge and tools do you use?
    Who do you report to? Who reports to you?
    Goals:

    What are you responsible for?
    What does it mean to be successful in your role?
    Challenges:

    What are your biggest challenges?
    How do you overcome these challenges?
    Company:

    What industry or industries does your company work in?
    What is the size of your company (revenue, employees?)
    Watering Holes:

    How do you learn about new information for your job?
    What publications or blogs do you read?
    What associations and social networks do you belong to?
    Personal Background:

    Age
    Family (single, married, children)
    Education
    Shopping Preferences:

    How to you prefer to interact with vendors (email, phone, in person?)
    Do you use the internet to research vendors or products? If yes, how do you search for information? What types of websites do you use?

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