Leave a comment

This post outlines the 50% Rule, which states that early startups should spend 50% of their time on product and 50% of their time on traction. This rule has three main benefits: 1) a faster feedback loop 2) a more solid launch platform 3) more and better information when considering a pivot.

  • DH

    Dave Howe

    over 4 years ago #

    Okay, okay... time to get the book.

  • DB

    Drake Ballew

    over 4 years ago #

    Great guest post from @justinmares. Would love to hear your thoughts and opinions!

  • ND

    Nichole Elizabeth DeMeré

    over 4 years ago #

    Nice to see a new article by Ash.

  • VV

    Visakan Veerasamy

    over 4 years ago #

    Interesting. Has anybody else done anything else, anything differently? Say, a cycle that's like, 80% product 20% traction for a month, then the other way around, etc?

    • RG

      Robert Graham

      over 4 years ago #

      I've done some variations on this distribution, but I think Justin has it right. He may even underrate the need for focusing on channels.

      If you can't reliably acquire customers, the quality of the product is pretty meaningless. If you build the whole thing first, even with a supportive group of early customers, the hardest part is still in front of you and a lot of marketing efforts take real calendar time and have significant inertia associated with them.

    • DB

      Drake Ballew

      over 4 years ago #

      This is an interesting question. I'd imagine that you're right and that when you divide a young business's lifetime into microcycles, you'll find some microcycles to be focused predominantly on product and some to be focused more on traction, maybe without any determinable pattern. It's just what the business needs at that time.

      But once you zoom out and get into mesocycles, you'll see the 50% rule come into play for many successful startups.

Join over 70,000 growth pros from companies like Uber, Pinterest & Twitter

Get Weekly Top Posts
High five! You’re in.
SHARE
28
28