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I recently had the privilege of working with Sean Ellis—Founder of GrowthHackers and Qualaroo—to reveal his secret framework for unlocking organic growth.

  • SE

    Sean Ellis

    almost 2 years ago #

    Great job capturing the essential elements of the process that I described Ty! One addition that I would highlight is that when you are analyzing the results from the multiple choice benefit statements, filter each statement separately and look for spikes in the percentage of people that would be very disappointed without your product. Ideally you'll have one that has a very high percentage that would be very disappointed without it, while still having fairly broad appeal (large percentage of people that selected that benefit). And then pay particular attention to the open ended write in that follows the question asking why they selected that as their most important benefit. This will really help you capture the essence of what makes the product a "must have." Once you understand that essence you can leverage it to boost your organic growth. Hope this makes sense!

    • SE

      Sean Ellis

      almost 2 years ago #

      Another thing I forgot to mention is that you should obviously only ask the "how would you feel if you could no longer use this product?" to people who've actually used the product. Ideally people who've used the product at least a couple of times and fairly recently (within the last couple of weeks). For the intent question, it's less important to ask people who've already used the product (in fact it can be helpful to ask people this question on their first visit while their initial intent is still fresh in their minds).

  • TM

    Ty Magnin

    almost 2 years ago #

    Just wanted to say thanks to @Sean for being so gracious in helping shape the article. I hope it be a helpful framework and source of inspiration to startups who have found product-market fit and are looking for their next stage of growth.

    I shared the piece with the Appcues team, and we're amped to follow the framework! Who else?!

  • WD

    Walker Donohue

    almost 2 years ago #

    Great stuff, Ty! Would love to see a future article emphasizing how to get your users to the "Must Have" experience _super fast_. I think it was Chamath @ Facebook who said it was not a matter of hours, minutes or even seconds but MILLISECONDS in which you had to think :)

  • WC

    Walter Chen

    almost 2 years ago #

    great stuff for the folks who couldn't be at SaaSFest.

  • SJ

    Sebastian Johansson

    almost 2 years ago #

    Thanks for sharing.

    These kind of surveys are gold for figuring out new titles etc. to AB-test. Have seen great results from it.

    Like the idea of creating ready made options for the second batch. And then asking them why that benefit is important to them. A quick way to dig deeper and still not bother your visitor too much.

    • SE

      Sean Ellis

      almost 2 years ago #

      In my experience the best surveys for A/B tests are the exit surveys. For example, when people abandon at a step in the funnel "why did you decide not to download our software today?" or "Why did you decide not to purchase today?" You can often get big A/B testing gains from what you learn on these surveys.

      To me, the most valuable part of this survey is that it shows to build an authentic promise that converts the right type of people who need your product's "must have" benefit. So even if you don't increase conversion rates at all, converting the right people with the right promise leads to much more passionate users that stay on the product and tell people about the product. This leads to the most sustainable kind of growth - organic growth.

      • SJ

        Sebastian Johansson

        almost 2 years ago #

        Yep, good point.

        I have battled with this issue many times before. Do I optimize the positioning of the website to speak directly to the must have users. Or do I go with a more generic positioning that converts better, but also attract a higher percentage of non-must-have buyers..

        For products with one off sales, I go with generic. I cant logically justify loosing 20% in revenue. At the same time, in the background, the product road map is still focused on must have users.

        This is done after initial growth when things have started to calm down. Would probably not go with a generic positioning in the startup phase. At that stage I would rather have fewer must have users, that will help shape the product with their feedback.

  • DM

    Daniel Marlin

    almost 2 years ago #

    I really liked the follow question to "Have you recommended this product?". Asking someone "How did you describe it?" is great a great way to learn the language someone uses when describing your product.

  • ES

    Edward Stephens

    almost 2 years ago #

    Great article Ty and thanks for pulling this together so we can all benefit.

    I loved point 2....

  • TH

    Trevor Hatfield

    almost 2 years ago #

    Great post @TyMagnin. I enjoyed the presentation @Sean did at SaaSFest and have been looking at ways to implement some of these ideas within our agency.

  • BT

    Blake Thorne

    almost 2 years ago #

    Excellent piece, Ty!

  • DM

    David Milberg

    almost 2 years ago #

    This is neat, thanks Sean

  • DF

    Derek Forde

    almost 2 years ago #

    great article

  • GB

    Gennady Barsky

    over 1 year ago #

    Great job thanks for sharing!

  • LM

    Lucho Molina

    about 1 year ago #

    Thanks for this. I am running this framework and have a couple of questions:

    1. How many responses do you guys think is a good number to make decisions?
    2. What if there's no clear "winner" between the 4 options given for the main benefit? Right now I have 120 responses almost equally distributed.

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