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Giving customers more options doesn’t always lead to better conversions.

In fact, it can kill off your website altogether. That’s what nearly happened when Fit Marketing redesigned the Underwater Audio website.

  • MB

    Morgan Brown

    over 6 years ago #

    The Paradox of Choice is a well known psychological concept, that essentially states that too many options creates analysis paralysis leading to fewer decisions being made. There's a good book and TED talk on the concept: http://www.ted.com/talks/barry_schwartz_on_the_paradox_of_choice.html

    A couple of other notes about this, calling a brand new design a control is just wrong. The control is the original website. The new design is the "B" in your test.

    Rolling out a new redesign cold is rarely a good idea. When possible new designs should be tested in several steps ahead of general roll out.

    First, UserTesting.com reviews of the design should be used to get qualitative feedback. Second, the new design should be made available either as a private beta, or deployed to just a fraction of your traffic for another round of feedback.

    After each step, feedback should be accounted for and improvements made. After the roll out, analytics around the key conversions should be measured and compared. Only when the new design hits satisfactory milestones should it be "turned on" for the rest of the audience.

    Their note about the reviews is also dubious. They admit that the results weren't statistically significant but acted on them any way. While the simplification end point worked, it's a dangerous game to play to make calls on tests before the results are significant. If you're calling tests too early, you're subjecting yourself to confirmation bias and likely designing your tests wrong in the first place.

    So while simplicity is an important heuristic, and the results are great, I wouldn't take this as a best practice study on how to do things.

    I also wonder whether the conversion gain was against the redesign or the original design. It's not clear from their article where the lift is from.

    • CK

      Chris Kilbourn

      over 6 years ago #

      Hey Morgan,

      Thanks for your feedback.
      All of those are great points.
      The conversion gain was against the second version of the new re-design. We'll be sure to fix that to make it more clear.

      Chris

  • AA

    Austen Allred

    over 6 years ago #

    Chris (the author) works with me at Fit Marketing - I'll have him create a GH account and jump on.

    • MB

      Morgan Brown

      over 6 years ago #

      Cool, thanks Austen. Looking forward to learning more about the test. I'm sure my overly didactic comment will whither a bit with some more information :)

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