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Predicting the future is oftentimes a foolhardy thing to do.

Predictions are perhaps most rampant in the marketing realm because we (the marketers) like to assume some level of certainty — even if we are just hypothesizing. It’s become an annual ritual for a majority of marketing teams to come up with a round-up of things that are going to die in the coming year.

In defense of all marketers, I think it’s a good thing for us to try and get a feel of which way the wind is blowing. The world of marketing runs on experimentation and continued elimination of processes that become invalid after a certain period of time. Therefore, the marketing community is often very quick to jump to conclusions even when our judgement seem sloppy and exaggerated.

As a faithful member of the tribe, I have my own strong opinions about the future of marketing. Now I am no Nostradamus or a marketing seer in any way (at least not yet). And expecting things to happen within 2020 would be short-sighted because trends don’t change by the calendar dates. Therefore, I try not to be prescriptive and myopic about my forecasts. My predictions are largely based on the current marketing norms that are indicative of certain trends and also certain aspects that are timeless. Therefore, I have tried to zoom out and envision these marketing trends to gradually take place over the next 10 years.

With that said, let’s take a closer look at my crystal ball for the future revelations. Abracadabra…!

  • UH

    Umme Hani

    about 2 months ago #

    Great build-up and loved the way you threw light on what is most definitely happening in the blog city of the marketing land, Yaageshwaran. Great Insights and delivery of promises made in the build-up. I was very intrigued by the section, "The future is probably no marketing". The fact that advertisements and pitching and the salesperson have increasingly become the least appealing aspects of a customer journey, stands very close to how I experience the customer journey as an interested party in purchasing a product. You do speak about the change and talk about what to be and what not to be as a marketer.
    Can you please give a distinct example and explain this phenomenon to me, "marketing is going to be highly inbound and commoditized in a self-service manner"? What do you think this specifically entails? "prospects complete 57% of their buyers' journey on their own before even getting in touch with a company’s sales team" What about this? How? Is it only limited to B2B? Or has it bled to B2C as well? I want to know if unconsciously I am following this. Looking forward to your response. Thank you.

    • YG

      Yaagneshwaran Ganesh

      about 2 months ago #

      Thanks for the feedback, Umme. What we mean with commoditizing in a self-service manner is - customers will seek what they want and reach out to companies more than the companies having to reach out to create opportunities with a prospect. A good example could be - if you know you want a chatbot for your website you yourself will have a list of chatbot products that you would want to trial out and explore a fit. Yes, this is true for both B2B and B2C. In B2C, imagine your process of buying something on Amazon. Our blog is more inclined to B2B, so we talk the B2B language in most cases. But the lines between B2B and B2C are almost disappearing.

      • UH

        Umme Hani

        about 2 months ago #

        Oh yeah, I get it now. I did not think of it in terms of how we do it already. Seeking out Amazon and purchasing a product or comparing the cost and offers on various marketplaces without an advertisement prompting us to do so. Thank you for laying it out so clearly for me to see.

  • BM

    brill mindz

    about 2 months ago #

    nice information about the future of marketing.

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