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How to get past priority inbox, next-level personalization, "this 1 CTA trick," and the best time to send -- based on my own most recent experiments and work with dozens of co's across the 500 portfolio.

  • BS

    Bhaskar Sarma

    about 2 years ago #

    Gmail seems to have its own mind about promotion/inbox/social placement.

    I have had multiple emails from Tim Ferriss, whose newsletter I subscribed to with a double opt-in land in my promotions tab. I move it manually to my inbox, but then the next emails again start piling up in the promotions tab.

    I have seen a number of legit emails, from senders like James Altucher, Unbounce and ConverisonXL land up in spam.

    Great trick with the search string :)

    • SS

      Susan Su

      about 2 years ago #

      Hey Bhaskar,

      We're subscribed to all the same people :) I think another takeaway here is that if you yourself are a "legit sender", you always gotta remember to watch your open rate closely -- it should be consistent. IF there is a sudden drop, then it's very likely that something is going on with Gmail filtering, and could be a time to take action through other channels to reach your users and ask them to move you manually, for you yourself to take out images from your emails, or as your recipients to mark you as priority.

  • AK

    Amit Kumar

    about 2 years ago #

    Hii Susan,

    First of all, thank you so much for this awesome share.

    These new email marketing techniques are really different and more helpful than the all other traditional techniques. Depersonalization, Pre-targeting and Retargeting, and The “Perfect” Time to Send, are some of the most interesting and helpful email marketing techniques which i found in this guide.

    The guide helped me a lot.

    • SS

      Susan Su

      about 2 years ago #

      Thank you Amit! Very glad it's helpful. These are based on recent things I've tried or observed, rather than more generic "best practices."

  • SR

    Susan Rawlings

    about 2 years ago #

    You are so right, email is a viable channel, a powerful one when done well. Thank you for the generous share, hopefully lots of people in email will get a chance to read this post, and rediscover the power of this channel. Thanks again!

  • SL

    Simcha Lazarus

    about 2 years ago #

    I'm just starting to explore email marketing and was really interested in reading your tips here. I was particularly interested in the idea that people are now turned off by having their names included in the subject line, something that I still do occasionally. I'll have to try your suggestion of including the company name instead, to see how it affects our open rate.
    Thanks for the great article!

  • GG

    Gaption Global

    about 2 years ago #

    This is a great read. Thank you for the great information.

  • TC

    Tammy Camp

    about 2 years ago #

    This is a gold mine Susan. Nice work!

  • AM

    Andreas Mitschke

    about 2 years ago #

    Great post, as you mentioned, always test your own audience, do not expect these to fit categorically.

    #1 and #2 necessarily need your target audience to be exposed to those techniques constantly to built a phrase-blindness. For example, the common student most certainly is not used to these patterns yet - personalization does work with them. We are used to it, because we live and breath in this industry - kinda biased position.

    Though I always applied #5 for high-involvement products, the way you phrased it reminds me of reverse, soft follow-up mails. You know, follow-ups without direct "asks" - interesting. It's a great technique, but requires a higher commitment.

    #6 is a great reminder to not always follow others thoughts.

    I always have the thought that SMS feels very personal and intrusive. What do you think about using SMS for product promotions such as in #7?

    • SS

      Susan Su

      about 2 years ago #

      Hey Andreas, I think selling directly through SMS (or Whatsapp) is tough, although some do it -- including foremost the carriers themselves.

      But using SMS as a followup to a promotion that you're also doing elsewhere can be really effective.

      As long as you're (ideally) getting people's phone number via opt-in, thus making sure you're doing permission-based marketing, SMS followups aren't as intrusive as you're afraid they might be.

      As I always say, don't let your own personal *opinions* (ie about whether something is intrusive or appropriate) govern your marketing, and realize that different segments can have wildly different responses. Instead, always spot test. I know, most obvious thing under the sun, but always a good reminder I tell myself :)

      • AM

        Andreas Mitschke

        about 2 years ago #

        That's true. However, most hypotheses are based upon our opinions, meant to be falsified :)

        .And yes, I also occasionally catch myself being afraid to test some things because of a strong opinion. Just like SMS. My personal insight would be that people are not really aware of their opt-in until a SMS pops up and suddenly they realize how much data they gave away.

        We are all human right. Require constant reminders... :/

  • MB

    Morgan Brown

    about 2 years ago #

    These are great ideas. Especially love the Welcome email link/hack.

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