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Luckily, there are many new tools that empower technically-minded marketers to be less dependent on developers to do complex analyses, link independent tools together or build and test landing pages.

So here it is: your epic list of tools for marketers with a technical mindset but limited coding chops.

  • LT

    Luke Thomas

    over 5 years ago #

    Perhaps I'm missing the point of the article (as the headline is "tools for marketer's who don't code"), but most of these tools require an understanding of [at least] javascript.

    If you need a developer's assistance setting these tools up, that's totally fine, but it will be a miserable experience if you have no understanding of api docs, and basic debugging.

    Oftentimes developers are thrown into situations ("here, setup XYZ product") by the marketing team, and left to figure things out for themselves. This is bad for both parties.

    In short, I don't think it's a requirement that marketers learn how to code, but wow, you can make your life (and others) much easier if you have even a limited understanding.

    • JB

      James Brewer

      over 5 years ago #

      Engineering is my day job and I disagree.

      Companies employ engineers so that the marketing team doesn't have to worry about setting these tools up and can focus on acquisition, retention, etc.

      I also disagree with your point about developers being thrown into the deep end and being left to make things work being a bad thing. Again, that is our job. Any engineer worth their salt doesn't need documentation. There are other ways of learning how systems work, especially when it's built in JavaScript and everything is visible from the browser console.

      I believe the point of this article is that there are a number of services that can be used and understood by non-technical team members. Yes, these tools require time upfront, but after that it becomes the responsibility of the tool-maker to provide content and data in an easily consumable way.

      • LT

        Luke Thomas

        over 5 years ago #

        I should clarify.

        1.) I agree that engineering teams exist to help with the implementation of these tools, but every engineering team I've ever worked with has an huge backlog of really important things to work on, and having a marketer constantly asking when tracking code will be setup leads to frustration by both parties.

        2. ) Next, there's a difference between getting things to "work" and getting things to work to their maximum ability. Here's an example:

        I'm a marketer, and I want to use Qualaroo - I ask an engineer to install the snippet of code, and then I'm off to the races. But wait, there's some api docs.

        http://help.qualaroo.com/hc/en-us/sections/200469946

        As a marketer who has a technical past, I dig into the docs, find out that I can add custom properties, which allows me to target surveys to trial users instead of paid users, and make sure that this is setup. I'm now using the tool to its fullest potential.

        3.) "Any engineer worth their salt doesn’t need documentation." <- I'm not sure what you mean. The first thing an engineer does when getting tasked with implementing these tools is to look at the docs.

        My point with my comment is that marketers and engineering teams can work better together, and a marketer can start by understanding a little bit more about the technology that they use.

        P.S. - most of my career I've spend working on engineering/dev teams. I was the guy getting requests from marketing for "XYZ tool", and my friends on the engineering teams loved to not have to deal with it.

    • CN

      Chris Neumann

      over 5 years ago #

      Coastics is my project, it doesn't require implementation. In general, for all these SaaS companies, a little bit of integration is usually required. I also think that marketers have to understand how the internet works a little bit, and there is basically no excuse for not understanding it. In probably 1-2 days, someone could watch a bunch of Treehouse lessons and "get" the fundamentals. To not do that seems crazy to me if you're serious about your career.

  • DW

    David Wilson

    over 5 years ago #

    Epic list of tools. My only "complaint" is that it is too good. Which ones do I start with? Adding a top five section to the list would have made it easier for readers to take action and start using some of them

    • JB

      James Brewer

      over 5 years ago #

      Here is a pro tip: When you are at a restaurant and you see something you like on the menu, close the menu. You've made your decision.

      Do the same with this list. If that doesn't work, start with the first article.

      • DS

        Daria Shualy

        almost 5 years ago #

        God James, I hope that when we start recruiting remotely you'll be available. I love the way you think! :)

        • JB

          James Brewer

          almost 5 years ago #

          Hey Daria! Thanks for the kind words. :) As it happens, I am currently accepting new consulting clients. Please feel free to reach out if you are interested. My email is james@jamesbrewer.io.

    • CN

      Chris Neumann

      over 5 years ago #

      Since Coastics is my project, I suggest starting there. :)

  • YK

    yael kochman

    over 5 years ago #

    Thx for sharing!
    As a marketing manager on a startup I don't have the luxury of having an engineer set up tools for me, and I can say that I know most tools on this list and I can implement almost all of them myself.

  • DM

    Dale Morris

    almost 5 years ago #

    This is a great list....That in from my experience isn't that difficult to implement at all. Sweet post! Learning something new is growth....

  • CT

    Charles Thomas

    over 4 years ago #

    I have one (odd) negative thing to say. I've been persuaded into marketing something as a product--I'll go back into it. Bear in mind that first and foremost blogging is mildly dangerous for poets looking for publication because many publishers feel that if it's published, it's published, and secondly because it's worthy as a publishing tool basically only for self-publication for poetry and probably most fictional writing. The actual negative thing is that I'm now viewing the poetry commercially (again; remember I sold poetry before) and although at 61 I've matured a trifle in comparison to 21...publication actually isn't the business of poets. Writing poetry is. Excellent article and excellent articles. And now you understand my hesitations.

  • MS

    maleela sukko

    about 4 years ago #

    Thanks for posting this

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