Leave a comment
Get the GH Bookmarklet

AMAs

Yale is fuboTV's VP and Head of North American marketing, focusing on utilizing data insights to drive subscriber growth. He joined the company in August 2017.

Prior to fuboTV, he was head of marketing at DramaFever, an OTT subscription service for international TV shows & movies, which was acquired by SoftBank in 2015 and is now part of Warner Bros. Yale started his career as an investment banking analyst in the technology, media, and telecom division of the Bank of Montreal.

Yale is currently looking to hire a Senior Marketing Manager (Paid Social) to join his team.

He will be live on Oct 26 starting at 930 AM PT for one and a half hours during which he will answer as many questions as possible.

Add this event to your Gcal

  • MD

    Matthew Dunstan

    about 2 months ago #

    What’s does the VP Marketing own when there is also a VP Growth?

    • YW

      Yale Wang

      about 2 months ago #

      I think it’s two sides of the same coin. If a VP of Marketing is not driving growth, whether it’s leads, subscriptions, revenue or some other KPI, ultimately what is that person doing? I think what’s led to the new VP of growth is more than just nomenclature. Traditionally, the marketing role was non-technical. One could focus on things like positioning, brand sentiment, etc.

      But that skillset, while important, has faded into the background. Startups are much more results oriented than other types of orgs, and they have to be able to measure what they do.

      Unless I’m looking for a very specialized role in creative, I know I certainly wouldn’t hire anybody onto my team that didn’t have an analytical or technical background.

  • TS

    Tonya Sims

    about 2 months ago #

    Hi Yale! Great to have you here 😊😊. Could you talk a little more about how your company uses data insights to drive subscriber growth or maybe give some examples on how a startup could do the same?

    • YW

      Yale Wang

      about 2 months ago #

      I think data is at the core of strategic decision making our business. All of our decision making, from product features to design to how we market is driven by data. We focus on data that is impactful to our KPIs, and in a subscription driven business, that revolves a lot around churn and conversion rates.

      For example when it comes to marketing, we look at all aspects of the funnel and measure each drop off point then optimize where we can find the biggest gains. In addition, as a video streaming startup, we have A LOT of data on user behavior. We know where people are watching (connected TVs vs mobile vs desktop), what their watching, how long they watch, etc. and use that data to inform everything from our recommendation engine to acquisition campaigns and everything in between. Great question btw!

      3 Share
      • AA

        Anuj Adhiya

        about 2 months ago #

        Can you share one acquisition campaign that was a result of such an analysis?

  • MD

    Mark Anthony de Jesus

    about 2 months ago #

    Hey Yale
    I saw the "Fubo Chavez" ad (more on this here for folks who don't know what I'm talking about: http://www.businessinsider.com/fubotv-fubo-chavez-deliberately-made-ads-designed-to-offend-people-2017-10).
    According to this article its helped fuboTV surpass the 100,000 subscriber mark.

    1. How much input did you/your team have when it came to:
    a. prioritizing ads as a way to grow vs other methods
    b. the ad itself which of course doesn't have general appeal.

    2. How are you actually able to attribute subscribers signing up because of these ads vs other sources?

    • YW

      Yale Wang

      about 2 months ago #

      1a.) We're always experimenting, and this was the first time we decided to do TV. We did it on a national scale, rolling it out during Sunday Night football and other marquee sporting events. We judged this campaign a bit differently than digital since tracking on TV is notorious hard. Our main goal was to introduce our brand in a sea of crowded competitors and given the response on social, I think that worked.

    • YW

      Yale Wang

      about 2 months ago #

      1b.) In marketing, if you try to appeal to everyone, you’ll end up appealing to no one. Using data from our existing digital campaigns, we knew exactly the type of user we wanted to acquire and what our expected customer lifetime value for that type of user would be.

      As a startup, one of our advantages is we can always ask for forgiveness rather than permission. The worst case scenario would have been doing something that is irrelevant.

      2 Share
    • YW

      Yale Wang

      about 2 months ago #

      2.) We’re lucky enough to have a world class data scientist, (he’s seriously got a phd in astrophysics), digging through all the noise. TV attribution is usually done on geo/time segmentation which leaves much to be desired. At a very basic level, one can look at increase in brand and search visibility, but we were able to dig a little deeper and come up with a predictive model and compare our performance against the model. This is not something I could have done myself. Having data scientists on a growth team is essential.

      • AA

        Anuj Adhiya

        about 2 months ago #

        What tools did you'll use to measure that increase in brand/search visibility?

  • TN

    Tri Nguyen

    about 2 months ago #

    Hi Yale
    I know that one of the biggest reasons that people are having a hard time cutting the cord is because of sports and fuboTV clearly plays into that.
    A big part of that of course is pricing because you can cut the cord but if you add up how much it costs to add up the services that give you only the channels you want - that could potentially land up costing as much or more than it does to not cut the cord.

    How much do you'll think about this macro picture and how does that inform your pricing strategy?
    Have you'll experimented with pricing in any way to see how that moves the needle with either getting people on the fence to take the leap to cut the cord and/or simply get more people to sign up based on the value the service provides?

    • YW

      Yale Wang

      about 2 months ago #

      On a macro level, I think Marc Andreessen said it best in his post “The Only Thing That Matters” (http://pmarchive.com/guide_to_startups_part4.html)

      “I'll assert that market is the most important factor in a startup's success or failure.”

      Right now, I think media is at the apex of a fundamental shift in consumer behavior. It kind of reminds of newspapers before the internet came along. Everything was fine and then change accelerated really fast. And when things do change, the value won’t be going to incumbents, it'll go to consumers and startups.

      Right now, consumers are paying something like $200 a month for 500 cable channels, of which they probably watch 12. With Netflix, it’s probably even less than that. I think consumers have been rather over-served by the existing pay TV ecosystem.

      Whereas fuboTV is $40 a month and instead of 500 channels, you get to keep coverage of great entertainment channels, plus your favorite sports teams….we have the NFL, NBA, MLB, NHL, Olympics, World Cup, etc. etc.

      So I don’t think we really need to play with price too much, especially when the legacy offering is 5x more expensive.

      3 Share
  • DH

    Dani Hart

    about 2 months ago #

    Hi Yale - great to have you on.
    When people churn, what is the biggest reason they do so?
    Are you able to predict when a user is going to churn, and if yes, how?
    What strategies have worked best to mitigate those that are about to churn?

    • YW

      Yale Wang

      about 2 months ago #

      We've created some predictive models to look at user behavior and what the relationship is with churn. For example, we can tell pretty accurately what might happen if somebody is only watching 5 hours of content a week instead of 10, or if they haven't initiated more than a certain number of video start events since trying the service.

      I think collecting data, both qualitative and quantitative is important. One can simply start by asking users for reasons on the churn out flow and matching that up to behavior as a good starting point. Sometimes, their answers are pretty surprising and it doesn't match up with other data we have (ex. they indicate price as the primary reason....but they were just paying way more for cable. Maybe they select price because it was the first answer in a choice of 5, and we forgot to randomize the order) and then digging into that.

      Figuring out whether or not we're delivering core product value and whether that's matching up or not with our marketing messages is something we think about constantly.

      3 Share
  • AM

    Anurag Mehra

    about 2 months ago #

    Hi Yale! How do you see the marketing demand growing for fuboTV as you're providing services in a particular niche whereas other players are provided services of various interests?

  • GH

    Glen Harper

    about 2 months ago #

    Thank you for joining us today, Yale.
    I understand that it hasn't been very long since you joined fuboTV. From your current viewpoint however, what do you see as the company's greatest growth challenge? How are you (thinking of) tackling that?

    • YW

      Yale Wang

      about 2 months ago #

      I think for any consumer business, a big competitive advantage legacy brands will have is trust. For example, if you were working in an e-commerce startup, why should a shopper buy from you instead of Amazon?

      Our competitors include Google (YouTubeTV), AT&T (DirecTV Now), PlayStation (Vue), and a few other well capitalized public companies that have spent billions on marketing and product. So if a consumer is in the market for cutting their cable, why should they choose us?

      Thankfully, the market itself is big and growing very very rapidly that I think there’s more than enough room for fuboTV to find our sweet spot, especially since we offer more live sports than anybody else. We have to communicate our core product value. I also think that as a startup, we can compete on speed and iterate much faster than legacy players to create a compelling product for consumers. After all, it usually is a startup that creates the most disruption in a changing industry.

      3 Share
  • JF

    Javier Feldman

    about 2 months ago #

    Hola Yale,
    Do you see Amazon Channels as a threat or a collaboration opportunity?
    Whatever the case, can you elaborate on why you feel that way?

    • YW

      Yale Wang

      about 2 months ago #

      I think Amazon is first of all, an incredible company. I admire their focus on being consumer centric. I think that's served users and them very well throughout the years.

      I know folks who've added their content on Amazon and have done great, and others who may not have done as well. There's something like 100+ channels on there right now so it's not just set it and forget it. I don't see Amazon channels as a direct competitor to our business. I think they compete more with the legacy cable providers. So who knows?

      With that said, I think if you're a direct to consumer business, you need to own that relationship. Otherwise, you're not direct to consumer.

  • AA

    Anuj Adhiya

    about 2 months ago #

    Hey Yale - very cool to finally have you on.

    1. What is your most successful acquisition channel currently?
    Is there something you do within that channel that you think is particular unique or different?

    2. Are there any channels that you're particularly excited about testing to see their potential? If yes, which one(s) and why?

  • DO

    Danielle Olivas

    about 2 months ago #

    Does fuboTV have a growth team?
    If yes, how does it fit organizationally in relation to Marketing and Product teams?
    If not, why not?

  • AL

    Arsene Lavaux

    about 2 months ago #

    Bonjour Yale,

    Thanks for doing this AMA. Say hi to David and Alberto from me.
    Happy to see they keep on growing in that exciting space.

    A few questions for you:

    1) Which team is going to win the Champions League this year?
    2) I see you recently joined the team at fuboTV, have you experienced any new growth learning over that short amount of time?
    3) In the U.S., as opposed to most other countries in the world, soccer is far from being the most watched and practiced sport. What should we do to turn that around?

    Merci!

    • YW

      Yale Wang

      about 2 months ago #

      1.) Tottenham.....Okay, so they might not be the favorites, but I'll take gritty teamwork over egotistical superstars any day of the week, especially Saturdays.

    • YW

      Yale Wang

      about 2 months ago #

      3.) Don't get me started! The pay to play system, ugh. Look, we absolutely have the talent as a country. And it's not like we're underinvesting. There needs to be a change at the top. You can't have the same people in place and expect different results.

    • YW

      Yale Wang

      about 2 months ago #

      2.) My prior experience was the head of marketing for another streaming service called DramaFever, which got sold to SoftBank and eventually Warner Bros. I was there for 5 years so I already came in with experience in the space. But that's actually how I met the founders of fuboTV, who were all from DramaFever.

      • AL

        Arsene Lavaux

        about 2 months ago #

        My question was about any growth learning from experiments you may have run on any lever of growth (retention, activation, acquisition and so forth).

  • JD

    James Dunn

    about 2 months ago #

    Given that your title includes North America, I assume that there already is/there will be a presence outside of NA at some point.
    Is international expansion the biggest growth opportunity in the near term? If yes, that's interesting and would love to hear more about why that might be the case given you'll still don't have ESPN in your lineup (which feels like it would really spur subscribers in NA).

    • YW

      Yale Wang

      about 2 months ago #

      Ha that's great you noticed that. We are indeed going to go international. I think the opportunity for this type of service is global. Besides, we've always had soccer in our DNA (we started as a soccer streaming service) and that's a global sport.

      As for the second part of your question...no comment =)

  • SK

    S Kodial

    about 2 months ago #

    Hey Yale
    What's been the biggest surprise of working at fuboTV so far?
    And related to that, what was it about the opportunity at fuboTV that flipped you to joining their team?

    • YW

      Yale Wang

      about 2 months ago #

      The biggest surprise is probably the amount of data we have access to. It's mind-boggling and certainly makes my job a lot more interesting!

      I was friends with all the fubo guys from our previous startup together. I knew them when it was just an idea and a few guys in an apartment. There's always a lot of risk in changing jobs, but I figured the worst thing that would happen is I get to work with my friends again. Sorry if that sounds a bit too care bear-y

      • AA

        Anuj Adhiya

        about 2 months ago #

        I love that working with friends and people you care about is a variable. The value of this is severely underestimated imo.

  • JP

    John Phamvan

    about 2 months ago #

    Hey Yale
    What tools are you using at FuboTV for experimentation & analytics right now?
    Where does your data live?

    Thanks!
    John

  • YW

    Yale Wang

    about 2 months ago #

    Hey guys, this was pretty fun but I got to run. Sorry I didn't get to everybody!

    Here's my plug: fuboTV is hiring for a whole bunch of positions not only in marketing, but also in customer service, product, engineering, etc. We've grown fast, and if you're interested in working at the intersection of tech, media, and sports, definitely check us out!

    https://boards.greenhouse.io/fubotv

  • PD

    Porus Daruvala

    about 2 months ago #

    Hi Yale
    You clearly have a lot of experience with media.
    Can you share any macro thoughts on the media landscape in general and where you foresee it moving (from a provider and consumer perspective) over the next 5 years?

    • YW

      Yale Wang

      about 2 months ago #

      Bundle economics drive the media industry. The legacy bundle has been a great deal for consumers, content owners and distributors. But as more consumers choose to leave the equation, that's put a lot of financial pressure on distributors and content owners. They've responded by raising prices in the short term, but in the long term, this is only adding fuel to the fire.

      I think I read that we're going to go from 40mm people cutting the cord to 80mm people in about 4 years. That is a huge shift. I don't think all these people are going to stop watching video all of a sudden. The means of distribution have to change.

      3 Share

Join over 70,000 growth pros from companies like Uber, Pinterest & Twitter

Get Weekly Top Posts
High five! You’re in.
SHARE
24
24