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Bob, who was the New England Direct Marketing Association's "Direct Marketer of the Year" in 2009, is a copywriter, content creator, social media marketer, consultant, teacher, presenter, and public speaker. In addition to his role as a hands-on creative professional, he takes pride in his ability to bring out the best in others and effect positive organizational change as a manager and mentor. His work has been recognized with over 40 awards from the New England Direct Marketing Association, including Gold for his blog on marketing (which he started in 2004), Gold for Best Tweets and Silver for Best Copywriting. Bob likes to keep his finger on the pulse of what's what and who's who in his field. Not only has he presented and spoken in public many times about social media, copywriting and marketing, he has been published or quoted in his areas of expertise in countless media outlets. He also has his own podcast on marketing and a YouTube channel with hundreds of videos. The current president of the American Marketing Association Boston, a past President of the New England Direct Marketing Association and a graduate of Leadership MetroWest's Leadership Academy, Bob is always happy to contribute in any way possible to the advancement of the industry in which he earns his livelihood.    

  • HA

    Hasan Asfahani

    12 days ago #

    Hi Bob,

    I'm really interested in the important role of psychology in social media and copywriting, what are your recommendations to develop myslef in this field?
    (Blogs, MOOCs, books, skills, ..)

    Many thanks in advance

    • BC

      Bob Cargill

      11 days ago #

      Understanding people and the reasons for their behavior, actions, decisions, etc. has a lot to do with success in social media, marketing, advertising, copywriting...heck, in business in general.

      It pays to be an empathetic professional. It's good to be very well-rounded and well-read, someone who has a diverse array of experiences with a wide variety a people and things.

      I would highly recommend reading any book written by Seth Godin. He, more than anyone else I know in this business, has his finger on the pulse of what works, and what doesn’t, in marketing today.

      I would also suggest following Nancy Harhut on Twitter https://twitter.com/nharhut, as I know this is an area she specializes in, and she's just a brilliant direct marketer, overall. Tell her I said "hello."

      1 Share
  • SA

    Stoica Alexandru

    12 days ago #

    Good to see you, Bob!

    Regarding your experience in copywritting, what are some tricks we can use to increase a conversion rate in an ecomm website?

    • BC

      Bob Cargill

      11 days ago #

      I would do whatever you can to get to know your customers and prospects better. I would be on Instagram every day doing stories. Same on Facebook. I would consider having regular live chats with your audience on social media or in your own private online community. The more you pay attention to what your customers want from you, the more likely they'll be to trust you and, ultimately, buy even more from you. I believe strongly in conversational copywriting, engaging with your constituents versus selling to them. Over time, my belief is that those tactics and strategies will yield better results.

  • BB

    Barbara Bonfim

    12 days ago #

    Hey Bob, thanks for sharing your insights with us!

    I have some questions on the content and business perspective. Look forward to hearing you out!

    1. How B2B companies can make good use of Twitter as a distribution channel?
    2. What are the management challenges you've encountered creating content at scale? What tools you couldn't live without?
    3. What should be expected of mentorship with you? What are the angles you like to approach?

    Thanks again!

    • BC

      Bob Cargill

      11 days ago #

      Hi Barbara! Great questions! Thanks for participating in this initiative…

      1. Twitter is my favorite social media channel. I believe strongly that most brands and businesses, as long as their audience is there, should have a presence on Twitter...especially B2B companies. I would share content on Twitter several times a day at least, while - at the same time - following those accounts that I could learn from as well as do business with. I would share some promotional content, sure, but I would share a lot more educational, informative, entertaining and engaging content. You don't want to come across as a sales person. You can't forget the social in social media. You want to show the human side of your brand. Twitter is a great distribution channel. You just have to make the time for it. You can't dabble here and there on it. You have to be committed to using it regularly. You have to immerse yourself in it in order to get something out of it as a business.

      2. Content marketing is definitely a marathon, not a sprint, so you do need to be prepared to create content on a frequent basis for a long, indefinite period of time. Quality writers and those who can create quality content are invaluable employees, if you ask me. No matter how good your tools are, your content is only as good as the people behind it. I rely on Feedly to provide me with a wealth of third-party content. I like Google Alerts, too. There are many good social media management tools. Hootsuite. Buffer. TweetDeck. The list is endless. My blog (thebobcargill.com) is on WordPress. Visual content is especially effective nowadays, so I would recommend taking many pictures and recording lots of video, then piecing together all of them into stories that you share online on a daily basis. Apps I like and use regularly include Canva, Picstitch, AutoCap, Videoshop, Podbean, etc.

      3. I enjoy sharing what I know with others. I love teaching but I am a lifelong learner, too. I encourage anyone who I am mentoring to experience all that both their professional and personal lives have to offer. Work-life balance is crucial. I believe in the importance of practicing what you preach, so it is not unusual for me to find myself in the weeds, if you will, doing whatever it takes to get the job done. I believe in hard work. I believe in always keeping an eye out for what’s coming down the pike. You have to be able to embrace change and not cling to the past in order to be a success today. Technology can be overwhelming, but it is important to understand it and be able to use it to your advantage. You can’t be afraid of experimentation, trial and error, early adoption, innovation, etc. Having passion for what you do and boundless energy certainly helps...that would be me.

      4 Share
  • AR

    Aymée Reis

    12 days ago #

    Do you think that if the majority of employees agree on a subject regarding change in the company, but the C-level doesn't, there's still room for a positive organizational change?

    • BC

      Bob Cargill

      11 days ago #

      That is an outstanding question, Aymee, regarding a situation I think a lot of employees have experienced, or will experience, in their careers. Of course, those in the C-suite make the final decisions, but those on the floor can certainly influence those decisions, especially in this day and age. I think senior management is much more inclined to listen to their employees nowadays than they were in the past. More and more organizations are constructing flat organizational hierarchies, which makes it possible to create positive change from all corners of the company. There is power in numbers, so I think it is always important to speak up on behalf of the greater good, although it certainly helps if you have the support of your C-level leaders.

      1 Share
  • AR

    Aymée Reis

    12 days ago #

    Do you think the copywriter role is being impacted by the start of the PQL era? And if so, how?

    • BC

      Bob Cargill

      11 days ago #

      I would imagine that there might be fewer opportunities for a copywriter to generate leads for an organization when a PQL program is involved, but unfortunately, I don't have any first-hand experience with one to say for sure.

  • AR

    Aymée Reis

    12 days ago #

    What are the skills needed to be a good public speaker?

    • BC

      Bob Cargill

      11 days ago #

      Oh, I could go on and on in answering that question! First of all - and it's more a quality, or an attribute, than a skill - you have to have the confidence to get up in front of an audience and express yourself freely. When I was young, I needed to work at that…over time. But once I overcame any fear I had of public speaking, I quickly learned how much I loved it. Practice helps people become better at public speaking. I got a lot of practice in Toastmasters, a public speaking group I joined around 1990 and was a member of for about 5 years or so. That is where I developed the skills I needed to go on the public speaking circuit when the opportunities began to present themselves. Public speakers need to be able to tell good stories. They need to be entertainers. Some speakers are very funny. Some speakers are very informative. Many salespeople are excellent public speakers. Those who have public speaking skills are often very successful wherever they go in both their personal and professional lives. Joining Toastmasters back in the day was one of the best decisions I’ve made in my life. Having strong public speaking skills has helped me in my career immensely. It pays to be an expert at something. But to be able to talk about what you do in front of an audience, that pays exponentially.

      2 Share
  • FC

    Felicia Campos

    12 days ago #

    Hi Bob! So excited to have you here! :)

    I am currently the Community Manager of a great group of content specialists, and I think you might help me A LOT with the following:

    1. what is the most precious asset for a content writer? What sort of content would you like your community to offer you as a junior and senior copywriter?

    2. what to prioritise when thinking about developing the content professionals' skills for the next years?

    3. where to find content professionals that are specialists in (very) specific niches?

    4. as far as I could grasp so far, the content market is not the same across the world. Different cultures have not only different terms for alike skills, but also the 'freelance' copywriting relation is also different across cultures. Could you tell us more about it from your experience? Any golden tips when dealing with content professionals (and clients seeking them) overseas?

    Thanks a lot!

    all the best :)

    Felícia

    • BC

      Bob Cargill

      11 days ago #

      1. I think some of the best content writers are very attentive to detail, deadline oriented, creative and convincing. In one way or another, they are able to connect with their audience and hold their attention.

      2. I think content professionals need to develop their storytelling skills and, also, learn how to create solid visual content, especially using video. Strategically, we need to be able to string together pieces of content that capture people’s attention from the get-go and, when all is said and done, earn their trust and win their business.

      3. I attend a great deal of networking events, which is where I meet a lot of partners and find a lot of resources. That is one thought. I also think LinkedIn could be a lot of help to you in addition to other social media channels such as Twitter and Facebook. Ask around publicly, both in-person and online. Use hashtags that are specific to the areas of specialty you require in your job candidates. Finally, try Google Alerts; let Google do the searching for you.

      4. I honestly have no experience working with clients or other content professionals overseas, but in my experience here in the United States, I feel strongly that the connections you have with people go a long way in helping to ensure your success. People do business with people. I get a lot of my business from referrals as well as through the many people I've gotten to know in-person during the course of my career so far. I put a lot of stock in networking and getting involved in industry organizations where you meet potential clients and other professionals like yourself. I have seen over the years more competition for business, especially more competition in terms of pricing, but at the same time, a growth in the number and types of opportunities. Technology has opened a lot of doors for a lot of people. It has made it possible to do business remotely with people we will probably never meet in person.

      1 Share
  • HS

    Hale Schneider

    12 days ago #

    Hi Bob! Can't wait to hear your answers to these great questions everyone has submitted.

    My question is this:

    What trends do you see in the way B2B SaaS companies do content marketing?
    What should companies be aware of going into 2020?

    Thanks!

    • BC

      Bob Cargill

      11 days ago #

      Hi Hale! Excellent question! I don't necessarily think these trends are exclusive to B2B SAS companies, but I can cite a few...

      Video marketing is only going to get bigger, so I encourage anyone in marketing to become an expert in that area. Podcasts are already huge, of course. I started one – on Podbean https://bobcargill.podbean.com/ – about two years ago, and it has done very, very well for me. I also believe strongly in real-time content, mainly using social media to share pictures, video and text live. Finally, going forward, a lot of our content is going to have to be geared towards voice search and smart devices such as phones (clearly) and speakers.

      1 Share
  • HO

    HENRIQUE OURO WEBER

    12 days ago #

    Hi Bob,

    Thank you for your time.

    I have been working with HR in the past years and recently Employer Branding is one of the hottest topics.
    Do you have any insights to share with me and my colleagues in how can we create great content to spread out companies messages?

    Best,
    Henrique

    • BC

      Bob Cargill

      11 days ago #

      This is a question right up my alley, as this is what I do a lot of for my clients...employer branding.

      Don’t be shy on social media…that would be my advice. Here’s a video I recorded to reinforce that point… https://youtu.be/XHj-MOOeyhk

      I would suggest sharing a lot of what goes on behind the scenes with your audience. Establish a strong, steady presence on social media and share content frequently, day in and day out.

      Employee profiles. Instagram stories. Videos on LinkedIn and YouTube.

      Put a face on your brand and a smile on your face…that's what I say often to anyone who will listen to me. You want to show that you have a positive, passionate employee base, people who love what they do on your company's behalf.

      Ideally, senior-level executives not only will buy into a program such as this, they will participate enthusiastically. Everybody in the company needs to be part of the conversation, within reason, in order to position your company as a great place to work.

      1 Share
  • GN

    Gustavo Nunes

    12 days ago #

    Hey, Bob!

    So awesome to have you here for an AMA and I have 2 questions for you.

    1) We live in an age where a lot of information is shared and people have less and less time to read 'long' contents. How to work with this duality to produce long content to build authority but at the same time, short enough so people can read on a daily basis.

    2) What kind of channels do you think that will grow next year? Videos, podcasts, instastories?

    Thank you.

    • BC

      Bob Cargill

      11 days ago #

      1. I think creating that long-form content is an excellent idea, but afterwards, I would break it up into smaller chunks that you share across social media. So it could be a lengthy video that you edit into excerpts, or a wordy blog post that you could whittle down into a bunch of tweets. Keep the larger piece of content on your main stage, your website, and share the smaller pieces of content on your satellite stages (see a video I recorded about satellite stages here… https://youtu.be/t5m_4Yj0sGs), which are your various social media properties, etc. That would be my advice.

      2. I think you answered your own question! I couldn't agree with you more! Video, audio and stories will grow wildly popular in the near future. TikTok is certainly a channel that people are betting on. I also like LinkedIn's chances of growing even more popular, as it has built up a resurgence of momentum in the last year or two. More and more professionals are using it like the other social media channels, sharing video there, even live video, and letting down their guard. The LinkedIn crowd is not as buttoned-up as it used to be in the past, which I think bodes well for the channel's future as corporate culture in general – concurrently – loosens up.

  • HV

    Hector Vangal

    10 days ago #

    Hi bob, thank you for sharing your ideas with us

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