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Hello! I bet you are wondering- “What’s an IBMer like you doing in a place like this?”  That’s simple, I love data & analytics, I love product and marketing. I didn’t want to choose and with Growth Hacking, you can have it all. So here I am, part of a movement of Growth inside IBM and yes – it’s catching on. It’s not just for startups anymore!

Currently, I am the Chief Digital Officer for IBM Analytics where we focus on all sorts of cool things that help people leverage data from databases to information integration, data warehousing, data science, predictive analytics and statistical analysis (to name a few). My job is to make our offerings more accessible and consumable so more people can be data-driven and smarter.  

This isn’t an easy transformation for a 100+ year old company but let’s face it, to be around that long, you gotta evolve and change.   Developing a digital route to market alongside our more traditional routes to market is core to our growth strategy at IBM and it’s completely focused on the user experience.  

We now have a Growth Hacking in a few parts of the IBM company and the Growth Mindset continues to gain momentum. That’s pretty cool when I think about how just a few short years ago people looked at me sideways when I said “growth hacking”.  

In my years at IBM, I have been in Tech Sales, Marketing, Product, Lab and now Digital Product.  

I look forward to your questions !!

I will be live on June 5 starting at 930 AM PT for one and a half hours during which I will answer as many questions as possible.

  • AL

    Arsene Lavaux

    9 months ago #

    Hi Nancy- Thank you for doing this AMA.

    1) What are the opportunities and the potential challenges of adopting a growth hacking mindset in a larger size company vs. an early stage startup?

    2) Are there any growth automation software/AI that you could share with us being used at IBM?

    Merci beaucoup!

    • NH

      Nancy Hensley

      9 months ago #

      1) Thank you Arsene for your question!! There are a ton of challenges growth hacking in a large organization but the biggest one is a mindset and cultural change. Even though we embrace agile our size makes things a challenge. When we run squads, they are quite large and geographically disbursed so we usually can't get everyone face to face other than Zoom. One of the challenges I think we have done a good job is really tackling is shifting our focus to not just making great products but making great products people love to use. In the last 3-5 years and with the help of lots of great feedback from NPS and our clients- we have shifted a ton of effort into consumability and usability of our products. That's huge. Some of these products are pretty mature so we aren't starting from scratch like a start up with a blank slate, we have some history to deal with :and that makes it a bit more challenging.

      2) We just started to use Northstar and I think this will do two things for us- first it will help consolidate all the experimentation in one place and it gives all the cross functional teams a great way to contribute to the ideas. Now that everyone truly values experimentation all the way up to the Senior Leadership team, we needed to get more organized. I also think this will help to make everyone feel more empowered to participate and collaborate on growth.

      • AA

        Anuj Adhiya

        9 months ago #

        Can you talk more about the challenges of introducing growth experimentation within mature products/lines? Did you run into anything you didn't anticipate in those scenarios?

  • SE

    Sean Ellis

    9 months ago #

    Very excited for your AMA Nancy! I have a bunch of questions, but I've narrowed it down to two...

    1) Are there any other enterprises that you look to for inspiration around how to effectively execute growth hacking at IBM?
    2) What role do you think growth hacking will play in enterprises over the next five years? How does this compare at companies that are primarily digital versus those that have physical products like FMCGs?

    • NH

      Nancy Hensley

      9 months ago #

      Hey Sean- so excited to be here!!! Thanks to you and Dani for having me!
      1) Ahh good question! Well I have to say that when I met Thibault from Adobe a few years ago at Growth Hackers I was so excited. He was battling the same challenges and has managed to really get a good cadence of growth experiments going and focus in his org. Of course I have to also say Microsoft because they have had a culture of growth for many years now and I am impressed at the size and scale at which they have embraced it.

      2) I think Growth will only get bigger in enterprises because the old ways of making product and going to market just don't give you enough lift and reach. Sure if you are like us you have a large and sustaining base of clients but to get real growth in this market we have to think differently. I remember I used to hear people say "think like a start up" and I would laugh because we simply weren't ever going to be a start up. What we should say is "think like a growth organization" where cross functional teams come together as a highly effective squads focused on the product experience and growth. Now that makes sense, I know how to do that.

      On the digital question- we don't really draw the line between digital and growth because growth is a big part of our digital transformation. Now it is a very different market than FMCGs for sure which is low cost and fast moving. Our challenge is our products are best in class, enterprise grade and generally more expensive. Sales cycles are not short. Our goal is to lower the entry point so that we can create a B2B business even inside a B2C. That means making it easy for that guy in accounting to purchase Cognos with his credit card and not have to get a PO. That might not sound like a big deal but many clients want a more friction-less experience to get the solutions they want and that doesn't include an RFP, Purchasing Department etc. Turning an enterprise software business into a B2C focus is a big shift but we can already see it working. Having a highly consumable digital route to market is helping us reach clients we would not have before and that's how we get growing ! I can't imagine that other large enterprises aren't thinking the same. To me it comes down to creating the right experience and meeting the client where they want to be. For us, growth depended on us doing that.

      5 Share
      • AA

        Anuj Adhiya

        9 months ago #

        What kinds of tests can you run when you have complex products with long sales cycles? I'm having a hard time visualizing this.

  • AA

    Anuj Adhiya

    9 months ago #

    Hey Nancy - very cool to have you on!
    In a previous life, I was at a 50 year old company where its fair to say that "fiefdoms" existed. Non-sharing of information and hierarchies were common.
    How do you go about tackling entrenched legacy behavior like this and get everyone to understand that growth is a team sport?
    What are the first few things you do at a practical level to even initiate this conversation so that it gets taken seriously at all levels of the organization?

    • NH

      Nancy Hensley

      9 months ago #

      Hello Anuj! Thank you for the question! Oh yes fiefdoms do exist and I won't say that growth has been easy. In the early days when we had nothing to hang our hats on it was MUCH harder to convince people this could work. Once we got a few wins under our belt we never shut up about them. It made it real for many people. We had proof. The other thing we realized was to document a guidebook of the things we were doing so the product and dev teams had an idea what it was all about. It's hard to trust when you can't see what's coming so we have tried to over communicate and educate as much as possible. For example- when we were pushing the development teams to prioritize instrumentation we took the time to take them through why it's important. Let's face it, most dev teams are already under a ton of stress and juggling priorities. On the most practical level start with why it matters, use case studies that they can identify with. I used the Jaegerbomb story which got people's attention but in reality it was a story we could relate to for growing a mature product. Don't give up!

      3 Share
  • PH

    Pradyut Hande

    9 months ago #

    Hey Nancy,

    Glad to have you here! Growth hacking as a sustainable concept and mentality has been embraced by companies across industries, regardless of size, evolutionary stage, and operational scale. In this regard, I had a question for you -

    Embedding growth as part of a company's DNA is a lot about countering the existing culture and creating a new sub culture. How do you go about doing this at a behemoth such as IBM? Would love to hear your thoughts on the same!

    • NH

      Nancy Hensley

      9 months ago #

      Hello Pradyut! Great question. When I first starting talking about Growth Hacking in IBM people looked at me sideways but I persisted because I truly believed it was the mindset change we needed. I must have been annoying enough where some of our senior executive team started to listen. I took every opportunity to educate everyone I could on the concepts like product market fit, rapid experimentation. That meant a lot of presentations, podcasts, meetings. Whatever it took. I just kept talking about it. Now it's exciting to see pockets of growth popping up and people talking about it all over IBM. Even if it was by one believer at a time. Change always starts with a few persistent people even in a huge company like IBM. The one thing I have learned at IBM is no one ever stopped you from being different if you had a good idea. Most people don't think that is the case but they also don't test the theory out enough.

      6 Share
      • PH

        Pradyut Hande

        9 months ago #

        Thanks for sharing your insights and experience on fostering a growth hacking mentality at a large enterprise, @nancyhensley!

        I also imagine it must have been disheartening from time to time when you weren't getting the desired traction, initially. Kudos to you for persisting with the same until the entire mentality gradually began taking root!

  • DH

    Dani Hart

    9 months ago #

    Hi Nancy,

    So excited to finally have you on here for an AMA... there's so much to learn from you!

    1. What keeps you going? Transforming an enterprise like IBM is an uphill and ongoing battle... how do you stay positive and keep fighting the good fight?
    2. If you could tell everyone at IBM 3 things for why modern day growth is important, what would they be?
    3. What new tools have you used in the transformation and why?

    Looking forward to learning more from you!

    Cheers,
    Dani

    • NH

      Nancy Hensley

      9 months ago #

      Hey Dani- I am so excited to do my first AMA! Thank you for having me!
      1) So this isn't the first time I have been on the disruptive side of change at IBM and when I was in the field we had this quote we loved "It's kinda fun to do the impossible" by Walt Disney. For me it's the challenge of being on the front side of the change -that really energizes me. I guess it's similar to people who love to do start ups. I truly believe that IBM is important to the tech world and we have to keep evolving. I choose to be a part of that change. How do I stay positive? The results of the work keep me positive because it shows it's working . The energy I see in our team when they get it is totally contagious so I try to share our stories of success throughout IBM as much as I can. One of the product managers and I are turning into a side act with all the presentations and podcasts we have done!
      Bottom line is I like a good challenge and Growth in an enterprise is for sure that! It's not just a project, it's about a cultural shift- that's exciting to be in the middle of.

      2) Oh good question! First I would say that the world becoming more digital is forcing us to change how we create product and go to market and that means we have to look at things differently. We can no longer separate out the product from the experience we build around it. That's a big shift for us in a large organization where everything is a separate group- Marketing, Product, Support etc. Growth only comes from a really great product experience and while we have made some best in class products we weren't always the best at understanding the experience of using them. It's truly an outside in approach. Sometimes that is tough for a big brand like us but we know it's essential to growth. Second I would tell them Growth is a team sport. We need everyone to be all in and following the same north star. So we have been busy instrumenting both our pages and our products with Segment. That effort alone has unified product, marketing and development and has opened up a world of opportunity for tools and insight that has been transformational for us. We are getting a more meaningful funnel view, we can see what product features are used more than others, we understand if someone follows all the way through on a trial or where they dropped off. It's pretty awesome compared to where we were just a few years ago. It's hard to argue with that progress. Lastly I would say growth is a journey - it won't happen overnight. For us it's been a collection of things we did right and wrong over time to get growth. We are constantly learning and exploring and it never ends. Once you start a growth initiative, it just keeps going !
      SE

      3 Share
  • JI

    Juan Izquierdo

    9 months ago #

    I’m in shock that an IBMer is doing an AMA here.

    Im glad that IBM will continue to outlast and evolve through these times of exponential change.

    1) Completely out of curiousity... Do you guys have a prediction/opinion on when will the early majority of US population will start using Watson like AI for their daily activities?

    2) Are you looking for a smart marketer to join your team? ;) not joking!

    • NH

      Nancy Hensley

      9 months ago #

      Hi Juan- well first let me say I think it's awesome that you are shocked. You can't be a 100+ year old company without embracing change right?
      1) While I would love to predict the pervasiveness of Watson I am not sure I can. I can tell you this. Everything we do is about enabling AI. In my business unit which has some of our core products like Information Integration, database, data warehousing and Data Science tools - it all revolves around helping our clients embrace AI. It starts with the data. We say you can't do AI without IA (information architecture). Making AI and Data Science simple and more consumable is the reason we get out of bed every single day.

      2) We are always looking for great people !!!

  • DH

    David Hofstadler

    9 months ago #

    Hey Nancy,

    Thanks for sharing your knowledge with us!

    In your opinion, is there some form or aspect of digital marketing that will stay cost effective at least 5 years down the line?

    • NH

      Nancy Hensley

      9 months ago #

      Hi David! Thanks for your question! The very reason I discovered Growth Hacking was because I was about to launch a SaaS product and I didn't think there was enough Marketing budget to get me where I needed to be. I was in a panic. The best thing about growth is that it allows you to explore many lower cost tactics that lead to growth. That was a huge mindset shift for me. I remember thinking about- how the heck did all these small companies grow so huge- Facebook, Uber- the answer was they embraced growth hacking. I think this will be a core skill for digital marketers. I think they need to be very data driven in everything they do so analytics is also a key aspect. I am lucky enough to guest lecture at Northwestern University Medill. I tell those students that to be successful you really need to be data driven and have a growth mindset, understand some of the core aspects of growth like product market fit and the value of rapid experimentation.

  • SS

    Sangram Sabat

    9 months ago #

    Hey Nancy,

    Thanks for the AMA! :)

    It's understood that frameworks are far more important in the GH process than tools. A lot of pre-revenue tech-startups, however, try to find $0 Marketing Hacks to build their businesses to begin with. Is that, in your opinion, the effective way to go about it?

    What are some of the most interesting growth hacks and tools that you have implemented in your career?

    • NH

      Nancy Hensley

      9 months ago #

      Hi Sangram! Well I think any low cost tactics that incrementally get you growth are worth exploring. Growth Hacking a more mature enterprise business is very different than a start up. For example - we might get growth by changing a licensing model. We also get growth the way everyone else does too- experimenting with page layouts and CTAs. I think my most favorite will always be what we did with SPSS Statistics in the beginning because there were so many doubters that we could hack growth by changing the consumption model. Everyone believed to get growth you had to change the product or add features and functions. Proving out smaller changes that make the experience better leads to growth has helped many people believe!

  • NH

    Nancy Hensley

    9 months ago #

    Thanks for the awesome questions everyone !!!!!

  • TN

    Tri Nguyen

    9 months ago #

    Hi Nancy
    1. As part of your journey into all things growth with IBM, did you discover whether the company (or business unit(s)) had a North Star Metric or did you have to develop it? Can you share what it is?

    2. Similar to Anuj's question, for larger organizations that do not have a North Star Metric defined, how do you even start the process of convincing anyone that this might be essential and needed?

    • NH

      Nancy Hensley

      9 months ago #

      Hello Tri!

      1) So the North Star is going to be different by product but many of the product lean towards active usage. We want our products to be essential to the consumers so this was a good one for many of our products.

      2) Great question, it's not easy but here is another way to look at it. When you get different groups together, chances are they are measured very differently. Our Marketing, Dev and Product all have different measurements of success they are striving for as an individual and a team. So what happens when you are trying to run a squad across all these teams? Well everyone obviously can get concerned about their own measurements. This is why I think the north star is so important, it unifies the squad so all these cross functional people are moving in the same direction. We actually do a project charter now too.

  • MD

    Mark Anthony de Jesus

    9 months ago #

    Hey Nancy,
    Can you share a recent experiment that was a big win or led to a big insight for you?

    • NH

      Nancy Hensley

      9 months ago #

      HI Mark! Sure and this is a shout out to a growth team that works with us and tries to help IBM wide on growth, they are our partners in crime when it comes to growth and this was a particularly a hit and one that Jason Barbato from our growth team gets credit for :

      Here is the set up….
      We felt that visitors to the Pricing page within the SPSS Stats product journey had intent to buy. We also felt that the design of the page and table of options at the time wasn't intuitive to guiding users toward purchase, as the actual "Configure and Buy" button was below the fold and outside of the table.
      So, we tested replacing the single "Try" button within the table, above the fold, with the Buy button. Page engagement remained flat. Then, we tested stacking both a Try and a Buy button inside the table, above the fold and found overall CTR on the page increased around 6% for two test geographies, including a net new uptick in Try clicks.
      As a result the stacked Try and Buy buttons were standardized for SPSS across 138 geographies with the U.S., as the highest volume page, seeing an 8% increase in digital, touchless (self-service) revenue in the first 30 days.

      4 Share
  • GH

    Glen Harper

    9 months ago #

    Thank you for joining us today, Nancy.

    The tension between growth/marketing and product teams is real even in smaller companies. I can't even imagine what that might be like at a company of IBM's size.
    What has worked best for you to get these teams in sync, especially when it comes to decisions regarding product roadmap and potential changes based on experimental insights?

    • NH

      Nancy Hensley

      9 months ago #

      Hi Glen- yes this has been a challenge because the growth team ends up being an overlay of sorts across the organization. When people don't understand what you are up to, you are a threat and possibly in their way. This is a natural reaction and I can tell you we struggle with it. How do we deal? Well for one we need to over communicate, this is painful but so necessary in a big company. My advice is to communicate until it hurts. Educate, document your methods so people understand what is coming and what their role is. That's half the battle. Our team actually sits within the Offering Management team (what we call product management) so we are closely aligned with the strategy and the direction of the product. I think this works. We strive every day to make sure we are a good partner to our product managers and add value. The other thing I think that helps is when we kick off a squad we do a pretty good job of giving an overview of the work and what's expected from the different roles, we develop a project charter that everyone signs off and we get moving. For the insights, we actually have a call every Monday it's called "Metrics Monday " where the insights from all the work is shared across functional teams by the growth leads. I mean who doesn't love data???

  • JP

    John Phamvan

    9 months ago #

    Hi Nancy
    As you well know, unless the entire team is aligned and working towards moving your North Star Metric, its very heard to make any meaningful progress on growth.
    How do you ensure that there is sufficient visibility and transparency so that everyone is on the same page?
    What tools and processes have worked well for you so far to ensure that the team collaborates meaningfully and productively?

    • NH

      Nancy Hensley

      9 months ago #

      HI John- great question. Visibility is everything. We are very transparent. We have a dashboard and detailed plans that we keep on an internal Wiki for all to see. Those plans and results are updated daily and weekly and we send out a blog with highlights to hundreds of interested parties in growth. It's hard to be transparent because it opens you up to all sorts of feedback good and bad but it is important for people to see and understand what we are doing here. The benefits of being very open with our work far outweigh the risks. On the tool side, we are just starting to get better at this as we are just starting to use North Star and break our excel habit!

  • JF

    Javier Feldman

    9 months ago #

    Hola Nancy,
    What has been the most surprising part (good or bad) of you spearheading the growth mindset within IBM (or your organization)?

    • NH

      Nancy Hensley

      9 months ago #

      Hi Javier- that's a great question. On the good side there are several very senior executives at IBM that fully embrace growth even faster than others. They are thinking bigger, more long term. They totally get and and are excited by it. I thought they would be the toughest ones to convince but it was the opposite. On the bad side, breaking out of the intense revenue focus we have all been trained on is both tough and surprising. We are a public company so everyone could see we needed to do something different. Our return to growth was a lot of work and because many people believed we had to do things differently, re-invent ourselves. I believe our return to growth is because we are thinking differently, more people get it- thats progress!

      • AA

        Anuj Adhiya

        9 months ago #

        Just one more thing on the point of being a public company. Is there anything from the growth perspective that is absolutely not allowed or possible because of this?

  • DO

    Danielle Olivas

    9 months ago #

    Hi Nancy
    What tools have you been using for experimentation?
    I ask more because many larger companies that I've come across are extremely resistant to or take a long time to approve 3rd party vendors for internal use.
    So there is a lot of tension between the build vs buy philosophies.
    If you've also encountered similar situations of having to convince internal stakeholders that 3rd party tools are not evil, what has worked best to help you win that argument?

    • NH

      Nancy Hensley

      9 months ago #

      So I will tell you a more recent story about that. We have been taking some time to build better on-boarding experiences for our clients, This is critical for us in growth. We recently discovered a tool called Appcues that can help accelerate that process tremendously. I was very cautious about bringing this forward to our Dev and Design teams but we also need them to scale so anything we can do to optimize that would be great. Also, any tool that plugs into Segment give us better insight and so that's really important. It's things like that where you think you might get some resistance to looking at alternative but our teams were very open minded. We also work with our partners in the Digital Business Group (who are IBM wide focused on growth) to help us define the right growth stack. We use Optimizely, Hot Jar, Segment, Amplitude- many of the tools you would expect. I am always curious about what else is out there too like Appcues that can help us scale.

  • JD

    James Dunn

    9 months ago #

    HI Nancy,

    What would you say the biggest growth challenge for IBM Analytics is currently
    How are you tackling it?

    • NH

      Nancy Hensley

      9 months ago #

      Hi James- I think the biggest growth challenge is reaching new adopter in new ways. Since we have been around a long time, well people might have some pre defined opinions about our technology and not give it a chance. Once we reach someone we can usually show them just how cool our solutions are. New adopters are a big drive for us and many of the things we are doing in growth is focused on that.

      • AA

        Anuj Adhiya

        9 months ago #

        What channels or methods have worked best of late to reach new adopters?
        Are there any that you haven't tried yet that you're excited to test out?

  • AP

    Above Promotions

    9 months ago #

    Hi Nancy.

    Do you feel as though Growth Hacking is more about the tech used to cause an increase in revenue or more about focusing on improving the product and service to fulfill a greater need for your customers?

    • NH

      Nancy Hensley

      9 months ago #

      For us it's about the experience and really focusing more on making it awesome. some of our products are "mature" in fact one of the first ones we started with is turning 50 this year. There were small things and big things we could do to accelerate growth. Everything from making the trial easier to download, making the pricing more consumable, making the product easier to find. We believe if you create a great experience all around you will get growth. In the case of this product, it did yield us about a 40% uplift over time and the time to acquire every 100 new clients was reduced by over 70%- now that is a growth accelerator.

  • SK

    S Kodial

    9 months ago #

    Hi Nancy

    Do you foresee a day when IBM Analytics makes its way into the startup world as a must-use/go-to tool?
    If not, why not?
    If yes, what would need to happen for that future to be true?

    • NH

      Nancy Hensley

      9 months ago #

      Hmmm I think that in many ways we have. We fully embrace agile, use design thinking, have growth teams and run squads. We behave in many ways like a start up. On the product side, many of our products are essential to our clients already- they are the systems that run their business, the systems of insight. I think for the future we just need to stay steady on our mission which is helping our clients get ready to really leverage AI and Data Science. That's our mission we all follow. If we can make these products much more accessible and easy to use- that's how we build our future.

  • TO

    Tade Odunlami

    9 months ago #

    Hello Nancy, great to have you here.

    1. Have you ever considered any data useless in terms of growth hacking, and how would you classify such data?

    2. Has IBM developed or in process of developing any growth hacking tool?

    3. Which tools would you recommend?

    • NH

      Nancy Hensley

      9 months ago #

      HI Tade- I am not sure if there is such a thing as useless data because by itself it might be useless but along side other data - it might be very meaningful. I joke that when people talk about "impressions" that's useless data. What we are going after is anything that gives us a better view of what is going on in the funnel and where our clients might be running into challenges with the product.

  • PD

    Porus Daruvala

    9 months ago #

    Hi Nancy

    Going off of something you said in a response above "we don't really draw the line between digital and growth"
    Does that in effect make you the Chief Growth Officer for IBM Analytics? :)

    But in seriousness, I have seen some reports, where large companies like Coca Cola are not hiring CMOs but CGO's instead, which goes to show the importance of the concept. (https://www.marketingweek.com/2017/03/29/chief-growth-officer-coca-cola/).

    What would it take for IBM to embrace it at such a high level by designating a companywide CGO in your opinion?

    • NH

      Nancy Hensley

      9 months ago #

      Chief Growth, Chief Digital, whatever it takes - lol I do think IBM is embracing Growth at the highest levels. Don't let titles fool you our General Manager which is like a division president is a huge fan. Growth teams are popping up all over with very high level support.

  • NH

    Nancy Hensley

    9 months ago #

    here is a follow up from Anuj Adhiya- Can you talk more about the challenges of introducing growth experimentation within mature products/lines? Did you run into anything you didn't anticipate in those scenarios? Yes !! so growth hacking more mature products was a bit more challenging in a few ways. First, there is a bit of a paranoia that you will break something you are trying to grow or make a current client upset. In other words, there is a base to content with that needs to roll with the changes and that always makes people nervous. So, we have to sort out how to experiment without breaking anything (at least not too much). This is different in start ups where the product is growing and changing all the time and feels less riskier than a mature product. One of the things I didn't initially anticipate was the challenge to operationalize some of the changes we wanted to make. For example- we want a really great experience and constantly improve our marketplace pages but, we also do business in several countries so that experience has to be easily translated and scaled else growth would be limited. It's a challenge between rapid changes and having the ability to scale and localize.

    What kinds of tests can you run when you have complex products with long sales cycles? I'm having a hard time visualizing this.- well like other products it can be at any stage of the journey. Example- is our trial too difficult - what can we do to get better conversion on that? We experiment with the CTAs page layouts, we watch where drop offs are happening in the funnel and focus there.

  • NH

    Nancy Hensley

    9 months ago #

    Another follow up - What channels or methods have worked best of late to reach new adopters?
    Are there any that you haven't tried yet that you're excited to test out? Wow I wish I had all the answers on this one. For us it's sorting out a way to go find new adopters that might not come to our marketplace. We call it making fans and adopters, meaning we go search for them where we know they are- github, docker or other communities and then seed our trials there as well as our own marketplace. The other interesting thing is by offering subscription versions of our enterprise software we have been able to get a ton of new adopters. Hmm things we haven't tried. I am excited to do more in on-boarding and in product as opposed to email to communicate. I think that is where we will see a big lift. The idea of being able to better guide and nudge clients so they get more value out of the product is so cool.

  • NH

    Nancy Hensley

    9 months ago #

    another follow up from Anuj- Just one more thing on the point of being a public company. Is there anything from the growth perspective that is absolutely not allowed or possible because of this? Wow that's a good question. Well I can tell you that GDPR has slowed alot of things down but in addition to that we also have rules about how many times we can touch a client in a given period of time. As you can imagine with a huge portfolio - this can be a challenge and we dont' want to over run our client's email boxes !!

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