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Clair leads the content and marketing teams at InVision, the leading design collaboration platform used by over 2 million people worldwide. To date, InVision has raised $135 million and is used by about 70% of Fortune 100 companies including design teams at Disney, IBM, Walmart, Apple, Verizon and General Motors.

Clair guides programs that unify creative strategy, brand impact, and demand generation. Recently, she managed the production and campaigning for the feature-length documentary DESIGN DISRUPTORS, currently being shown in over 100 cities around the world and generating nearly 100,000 leads. Her contributions have helped over 2M users become better designers, increased traffic to InVision-owned web properties by over 800% and boosted revenue by over 130% since she joined the company in 2014. Under Clair's leadership, InVision was named No. 1 on Hubspot's 2015 list for "Exceptional B2B Content Marketing", No. 1 on Forbes list of "25 Digital Design Blogs to Follow" and No. 1 on The Next Web's list of "Promising Digital Design Blogs to Follow."

You can follow Clair on Twitter at @theclairbyrd or InVision's blog at http://blog.invisionapp.com/author/clair-byrd

She will be live on September 6 starting at 930 AM for one and a half hours during which she will answer as many questions as possible.

  • HQ

    Hila Qu

    almost 3 years ago #

    Hi Clair,

    Such a stellar background in content marketing, and welcome to Growthhackers!

    I have 2 questions: one is more high level, the other is more tactic.

    1) As performance marketing and growth marketing become more popular, there is a big requirement of measuring every result and understanding ROI. Branding and content are super powerful, but they are a little bit indirect compared to other channels, how do you go about setting the goal for branding/content initiatives and evaluating the result?

    2) InVision has an amazing blog, can you share what are the key elements to create a successful blog, especially for companies that just get started, and what is the process your team use to maintain and improve the blog currently?

    Thank you for your insight!

    Hila

    • CB

      Clair Byrd

      almost 3 years ago #

      Hi Hila! Thanks for participating and sorry that this is going to be super long!

      1. I love that this is my first question. It has always been my #1 priority when building any content marketing program to be able to emphatically and with hard numbers prove the exact value and ROI for each program. For example, at InVision, we know exactly how many signups and revenue each piece of content is responsible for directly attributing. Our viewpoint on marketing is that brand and demand gen/performance marketing are not diametrically opposed, but intrinsically linked. We won’t release things that don’t represent our brand or things that don’t do hard work for us on the demand gen side.

      That said, we don’t actually look at “brand” metrics for our content plays, but hard demand generation numbers like net new contacts and product signups, enterprise leads, and ultimately, dollars produced from each piece of content.

      Because we apply growth/demand generation metrics to our content plays, it’s easy to set goals, because content rolls up to the same growth goals as our other marketing programs. We can tell if a specific content play, say, an ecourse on UI design is objectively better than another piece of content from the perspective of signups or revenue based on the baseline expectations we have for each content type. We can also show that content can be (and often is) better (for us) than some performance marketing plays from a signup and revenue perspective, which allows us to invest into bigger and better content programs.

      2. First, thanks so much for the compliment! The InVision blog is a community-wide effort and something we’re really proud of.

      Creating a successful blog is really about finding a resonant story and removing yourself from competition. For example, InVision’s blog runs very similarly to a magazine—the content is 95% contributed. We chose this direction because: A) we wanted the blog to be a true representation of the conversations happening in the design community at any given moment and B) because there are few major media that talk about design leadership and methodology without an agenda. We could separate ourselves from our competition, proactively engage our community, and tell a compelling story about design by implementing this strategy.

      If you are just getting started, getting contributors can be hard. When we were still small, we found that making contributors look really sexy was super helpful—we made our blog beautiful and we leveraged our existing assets (email list, press network, etc) to pump up the impact of each blog post.

      If I had to condense, here are a few things to consider when you’re starting out a contributed blog program:
      -Find a unique viewpoint and separate yourself from any competition
      -Leverage your existing company assets to increase the impact of your early content
      -Be service-oriented for your contributors. Make it easy for them. Nothing kills contribution sooner than too much clunky process.
      -Create a framework for acceptable content, rather than a prescriptive format. E.g. “We will publish works on the topics of design leadership and design thinking” rather than “We need you to write about Atomic design.”

      InVision keeps the quality of our content high by being incredibly service-oriented toward our contributors. We make the contribution about them, rather than us, and provide guidance, support, and editorial help (even so far as co-writing collaboratively with them) during the contribution process. It’s high touch, but worth it!

      • AA

        Anuj Adhiya

        almost 3 years ago #

        Pls don't be sorry about super long answers - we love those - keep them coming!
        Also - what a great way to kick off your AMA!:raised_hands:

      • HQ

        Hila Qu

        almost 3 years ago #

        Clair, such a wonderful answer! I admire Invision's approach of building a community without an agenda, it's hard but will definitely pay off in the long run!al

  • CB

    Clair Byrd

    almost 3 years ago #

    Hey everyone! I'm super excited to be joining today and answering all these excellent questions. I'll try to get to all of them, but if I can't get to yours in the time allotted, please feel free to tweet at me (@theclairbyrd) or you can email me (clair@invisionapp). It's great to meet all of you!

  • SE

    Sean Ellis

    almost 3 years ago #

    Hi Clair, thank you for doing this AMA with us. What is the hardest challenge marketing InVision and how have you overcome this challenge?

    • CB

      Clair Byrd

      almost 3 years ago #

      Hi Sean! Great question.

      The hardest part about marketing InVision is marketing to a customer pool who is used to being mistreated. Creatives are used to a lot of not awesome treatment professionally, and as such, they aren't trusting. Anything that smells like "marketing" to them will ultimately fail.

      We've overcome this by focusing first and foremost on the value the things we make create for our users. Craft (invisionapp.com/craft) is a great example of this—Craft is an incredibly valuable, useful toolset—that also happens to drop folks into the InVision marketing funnel. However, we've had no bad feedback due to the quality and usefulness of the original asset.

      7 Share
  • CB

    Clair Byrd

    almost 3 years ago #

    Hi everyone, thank you so much for all the incredibly thoughtful questions. I loved answering them! I'll be checking back in over the next few days to follow up and answer any new questions that might pop up.

    If you enjoyed this and/or just want to talk shop—I'm super easy to get ahold of. Tweet at me (@theclairbyrd) or email (clair@invisionapp)! Looking forward to hearing from you and thanks again for a super fun morning!

  • MN

    Mike Nelson

    almost 3 years ago #

    You have done an awesome job, Claire!

    When it comes to getting approvals from Clark and others in management, what is the biggest issue that you face? How hard was it to sell the Design Disruptors documentary to them?

    Also, how do you decide what you will spend your budget on when you have so many choices?

    • CB

      Clair Byrd

      almost 3 years ago #

      Thanks so much, Mike!

      1. Honestly, I have a charmed existence at InVision. I have very few issues getting content initiatives approved because Clark, et al believe deeply in content’s ability to do hard work for a growing company. Also, because a huge amount of our content is contributed, we keep our overhead super low and can invest in more diverse programs (like DESIGN DISRUPTORS) without affecting other programs.

      However, in the past, being able to tie content directly to dollars produced has always helped the “approvals and new initiatives” conversation.

      DD was an idea before I joined, and it came from Clark, so it wasn't a hard sell ;). The film was seeded during a conversation Clark hard with some really talented design leadership—he said “I wish we could just film all this and share it with the community!” The rest is history. My team’s role in the film was to take that sentiment and blow it up into something bigger than the sum of its parts. And make the actual film!

      2. Because much of our content in contributed, we can experiment with a million different themes with very minimal investment. We double down creating content internally on topics that we know will be performant based on the contributed content’s performance.

  • AA

    Aldin A

    almost 3 years ago #

    Hi Clair!

    Thanks for doing this AMA!

    1)There are a million things you could be working on growth at any one time. Can you talk about your process for
    figuring out the MOST important thing you have work on RIGHT for growth? How do you make and prioritize your growth road map?

    2)How do think about retaining users, if your user only need to use your app occasionally by nature (ex shopping app)?
    If your app isn't used frequently building up the habit is hard, which makes it even harder to retain the user.
    How do you go about trying to stay top of mind so when the user has a need that your app solves they think of you?

    3)Can you name some resource you use to learn from about growth? Books, podcasts, blogs, courses etc?

    Thanks!

    • CB

      Clair Byrd

      almost 3 years ago #

      Hi Aldin! Sorry for jumping out of order on your question—I wanted some time to think through it!

      1. This is not a deeply complex process, and I wish I had something more mind blowing to share here. :D We choose the things we work on based on their potential impact on our company goals (signup growth, conversion, and revenue) and their perceived level of effort. We prioritize the things we think have the highest likelihood of greatly impacting those goals with the most reasonable levels of effort. Beyond that, we encourage an environment of experimentation and testing—if we find a winner, we work it into the overall roadmap.

      2. If your app isn't in daily use by your user, I'd recommend thinking about your marketing as a product. This is something we do at InVision—our marketing *is* a product for a vast number of our users. Create something outside your product that solves a product-adjacent "daily" problem, inspires them, or educates them. And do this in places they already frequent instead of assuming they will come back to you. Use smart retargeting, social channels, forums and communities, etc.

      3. I find the best way to learn is by doing, but also by ripping apart the marketing strategies of companies you respect. I've found much more value in picking apart a particularly good ebook workflow more valuable than listening to any number of podcasts.

  • SA

    Shaker A

    almost 3 years ago #

    Hey Clair,

    Great to have you here at GH.

    1) How did you figure out what to use as benchmarks for things like retention, repeat purchase rate, avg cart size, etc. Where and how did you get the bench marking information to make sure that your core metrics were healthy compared to the industry and your competitors?

    2) After you've found a viable channel how do you think about scaling the acquisition channel? What changes for how you use a channel from when you first identify it's viability, to using the traffic channel at scale? What question do you ask yourself to make sure that the channels stays viable as you scale it up? What are the pitfalls to avoid as you scale a channel? How do you overcome said pitfalls?

    3)Can you talk about some of the challenges of scaling the business and how you've overcome them?

    • CB

      Clair Byrd

      almost 3 years ago #

      Hi Shaker! Really thoughtful questions!

      1. This is a tough question. Ultimately, we benchmark against ourself and have created our own industry baselines. I can't share a lot of this publicly, but if you want to follow up, you can email me: clair@invisionapp

      2. The first step of scaling any channel is to optimize for inefficiencies. There are always ways to make production for any channel better—reducing inefficiencies is critical at the beginning of any scale project.

      I don't have a perfect answer for the second part of question 2. I always try to maintain the original integrity of the channel as the program scales—to not do so fundamentally changes the character of the channel and doesn't speak user expectations from that specific channel. And honestly, not everything scales very well.

      Overall, making sure that all the things *around* the channel you are looking to scale will help. For instance, if you want to scale content, we all know that producing more content is hard. However, you can easily scale technology and process around the content—email, paid acq, SEO-optimized landing pages, etc.

      One big pitfall—not investing in your technology stack. Make sure you can handle the load of scaling big before you try. :)

      3. One of our biggest challenges has been growing internally with the same vigor that we have been from a userbase perspective. Hiring, staffing, internal process, cross team collaboration, systems and technology, etc. We are still overcoming some of these issues, but I think the most important part is being willing to accept that mistakes were made, walking back the process or system or feature that is the problem, and thoughtfully implementing a better solution to that problem. Staying unmarried to historical "darlings," be they features or internal processes, is critical to growing the business.

  • RB

    Ry B

    almost 3 years ago #

    Clair,
    Appreciate you doing this AMA.

    1)What are the most important lessons you've learned over your career?

    2)What are things startups should do/focus on to not only increase their survival rates, but thrive? Conversely What are the subtle (and not so obvious) things you see early stage companies screwing up on that they really can't afford to screw up, and how do they fix them?

    3)What attributes do you think a successful startup founder needs to be successful?

    4)Similar to #3, what attributes do you think an effective managers need?)How do you go about empowering employees? What does empowerment look like at Invision? How do you instill an ownership mentality in them?

    Looking forward to learning from you!

    • CB

      Clair Byrd

      almost 3 years ago #

      Hi! So glad you're here.

      1. There is no right way to do things and “best practices” are often garbage. Do your own due diligence, research, experimentation, and legwork—toss the rulebook.

      2. Thriving requires separating yourself from your and stepping away from competition. More startups need to focus deeply on themselves rather than on what other companies in their space are doing. Compete on your terms, instead of the industry's.

      Regarding subtle things that people really shouldn’t afford to screw up.. Design. Design is critical. It is no longer a nice-to-have or a “maybe later.” Hire the best design talent you can find and actually listen to them!

      3. Founders need to be fearlessly committed to their vision. Startups fail when they waver from their original intent—the impact they wanted to have on their target customer. Oh, and smart about hiring, because the startups success will be hugely impacted by the depth and breadth of talent on your team. HIRE SLOWLY!

      4. I personally find the best managers to be *interested*, but not overly involved in the day to day. Managers need to be able to guide programs and employees effectively, and you can't do that if you are in the weeds. Additionally, great managers are incredibly accessible and create a culture of accessibility.

      Empowerment is created by example. Owning up to successes and failures as a manager helps people to think about their own programs similarly. Instilling ownership also requires public handoffs by the employee's manager on initiatives the employee is owning. For example, at InVision, projects have individual stakeholders from each core part of the team represented at kickoffs/status meetings, instead of team leads. That way the employee, rather than the lead, is tasked with solving problems for that project and also gets the credit when the thing launches.

  • SN

    Simon Nung

    almost 3 years ago #

    Hi Clair,

    I have three questions, one in two parts.

    1) What did you do before marketing and was it hard getting to where you are? i.e. did you get mentors and etc?

    2) How do you come up with content that is amazing that you'll know will attract a lot of views? i.e. what kind of research do you do to know if that peice of content is going to do well and raise the brand profile.

    3) The technology today is coming thick and fast as there is a solution for everything (well, most!) to make marketers job much easier and freeing their time to retarget the ones that haven't bitten the bait yet, giving them much more control in terms of turning them into loyal customers but MY QUESTION to you is what problems are we still facing as marketers?

    Thanks for taking the time.

    Simon

    • CB

      Clair Byrd

      almost 3 years ago #

      Hi Simon! Great questions.

      1. I originally intended to be a chef. By age 19, I was working professionally in kitchens. In 2009, I moved to the Bay area to cook—I took a job as a private chef for an affluent family. Unfortunately, I had to take a “day” job doing operations to make ends meet in the Bay area. In that role, I slowly began taking on responsibilities outside of operations—things I could pull from my previous experience (I'd worked for a small ecommerce company previously), like how they positioned themselves in the market, using social media, writing web copy, etc. I found that I really enjoyed this work and decided to pursue it full time.

      My career switch was defined by quite a bit of “fake it til you make it,” entirely too much ambition, and pure hustle. The longer version of this story includes stacking several pro bono clients on top of my two jobs to make up vertically (project diversity) in the experience that my peers had in horizontal (time) experience. I committed to things I 100% did not know how to do and then figured it out, or sought out mentors who did. I took classes, read voraciously, and tested bad ideas until I started to feel like I actually knew what I was doing. I also take a lot of inspiration from the kitchen—it was there I learned the value of developing highly repeatable processes that lead to high-quality results every time.

      TLDR; take on pro bono work and learn by doing!

      2. Contributed content strategies are a beautiful thing for R&D for content. First, we know what our customers are interested in seeing/hearing about because they are the ones creating the content. Second, we can test themes quickly and cheaply because, again, the content in contributed. We can see based on performance what things work for us, and double down on those topics in different forms (video, long format content, etc).

      3. Quality! I personally find that the huge breadth of technology we have at our fingers lowers the overall quality of our marketing. I would do a happy dance if I saw more marketers putting “quality of deliverable” at the top of their requirements briefs.

      4 Share
  • SS

    Shaun Siddiqui

    almost 3 years ago #

    Hi Clair,

    Thanks for doing this AMA!

    I have a few questions:

    1) What are the essentials that go into building a content strategy and the execution of that strategy?

    2) As Head of Marketing, how do you choose what channels you should be focusing on? Do you have a systematic process to identify which channels are working from those that are not?

    3) What books, blogs or other content do you recommend for becoming a better marketer?

    Thanks

    Shaun.

    • CB

      Clair Byrd

      almost 3 years ago #

      Hey Shaun! Thanks for the questions.

      1. There is no one right way to do content. Sometimes things work for one audience that completely fail for another. The essentials are really that there are none—each content marketing strategy is unique to its audience and to itself.

      However, the foundation of any good content program is to find the intersection between things your customer wants, and things not being produced by anyone else.

      Separate yourself from competition with your content!

      2. All our marketing initiatives roll up into the same overarching growth metrics for the company. Because all things are measured equally, it becomes easy to identify and cut or alter under-performers. And vice versa, we can easily identify what programs to invest more deeply in.

      3. I'd recommend reverse engineering the strategies of companies you respect. Get into their funnels from all sides. Figure out how they are targeting you, how they are triggering content, how they are integrating their channels across experiences. And then remake components in your own campaigns.

  • PJ

    Pedro Junior

    almost 3 years ago #

    Hi Clair, thanks for taking the time to answer our questions.

    1) What would you say is the best way to start improving SEO without money or time spent on content?

    2) Where would you suggest someone focus SEO when the startup is B2B2C? What about B2B or B2C?

    3) What is the main difficulty with any (marketing) strategy focused on B2B?

    Thanks

    • CB

      Clair Byrd

      almost 3 years ago #

      Hi Pedro! Thanks for participating today.

      1. Honestly, I wouldn’t recommend trying to undertake any kind of SEO “hack,” because by and large I’ve found them to not work at best, and often, negatively affect your search rankings. SEO is deeply dependent on quality of content. However, if you don’t have time, interest, or budget to invest in content, you can always be mindful of how you are building your links. Example: invisionapp.com/invision-product-updates will rank better than invisionapp.com/product.

      2. This really depends deeply on your product, but think like your user. Any kind of search behavior requires specific intent. Figuring out the most logical strings of words to match your potential user’s intent is where the money is for SEO.

      3. Noise. There is a lot of content, ads, email, and other marketing in the world. The best way to break through the noise is to make the best, highest quality things you can.

  • ES

    Edward Stephens

    almost 3 years ago #

    Hi Clair,

    So good to have you on can't wait to hear your answers.

    1) How do you feel InVision has reshaped the remote workforce and the idea of team collaboration and how do you invision this collaboration developing in the future (whether it be through VR or AR etc)?

    2) What growth or retention issues have InVision faced since you joined and were these entirely unexpected? Further more with so many users, what does continued growth look like for Invision?

    3) Could you have ever predicted the success of Design Disruptors and what are the best means with which you've marketed it?

    I can't wait to hear your answers.

    Best wishes,

    Ed

    • CB

      Clair Byrd

      almost 3 years ago #

      Hi Ed!

      1. InVision simply gives people the ability to do their best work, wherever they want to. Offices are often not the best place for creative folks to work—so we created a tool that mimics that environment without actually having a physical space requirement.

      We incorporate this into our corporate structure as well—we’re 230 entirely remote employees.

      2. InVision has been very lucky to have achieved a very strong product-market fit that is very sticky with our userbase. However, our biggest challenge, like any SaaS company, is activation. We are tackling this problem by thinking about activation as an omnichannel experience instead of a solely in-product experience. But no, this was not entirely unexpected. :)

      3. I believed deeply in the potential of DESIGN DISRUPTORS from the start, but I was super shocked by how actively the design community wanted to be involved! The best channel for our release was the community screening program, which allows a community organizer, designer at a company, or educators to organize their own screenings. We’ve had well over 1000 inbound requests to do screenings, 200+ actual community events, and seen another 17k folks engage with the film.

  • LS

    Logan Stoneman

    almost 3 years ago #

    Hey Clair! For someone about to start in the field of content marketing, what would you suggest would be the best first step?

    • CB

      Clair Byrd

      almost 3 years ago #

      Rip apart the content marketing strategies of your favorite content-focused brands. It’s kind of like learning anatomy through dissection.

  • MM

    martín medina

    almost 3 years ago #

    Clair,

    Thanks for coming on here and doing this AMA!

    What do you see the role of both marketing and sales in a growth team? How do the teams cooperate and collaborate at InVision?

    What are some of the most exciting things you’ve seen in marketing and content? Are there any new platforms or types of content you are particularly excited for?

    Thanks!

    • CB

      Clair Byrd

      almost 3 years ago #

      Hi Martín! Happy to answer these questions.

      1. Marketing’s job is to clearly articulate why the product is awesome, in the terms and form that are best understood/accepted by the target customer, in a 1:many format. Sales’s job is the same, just in a more 1:1 format.

      At InVision, marketing is responsible for acquiring the potential customer, qualifying them, and then handing the best of the best prospects off to the sales team for a greater depth of attention.

      2. I think this really begs the question “what is content marketing?” I personally feel that many things that are not traditional content marketing, can be, under the right circumstances, content marketing. For example, physical spaces with content-driven programming. An unbranded media site that produces a periodical print magazine. Interactive business intelligence tools based on industry data. The list is really endless!

  • EM

    Emily Maginess

    almost 3 years ago #

    Hi Clair,

    I know you're a big fan of repeatable process, and I'm really interested in how marketing teams scale and manage the creation of content across large teams without losing quality.

    With this in mind, what practical processes/mechanisms have been most successful in helping you do this at InVision?

    Thx,
    Emily

    • CB

      Clair Byrd

      almost 3 years ago #

      Hey Emily! I love this question.

      For us, it’s all about the hiring and staffing appropriately. We hire people committed to excellence on a personal level—no matter what role they are in. This helps keep our quality of deliverable high across the board.

      From a staffing perspective, we are 100% cross-functional with dedicated design, engineering, and content staff on every project we produce. This diversity of stakeholder perspective on each project, from kickoff to launch, helps us create the best work we possibly can. It also helps us maintain consistency throughout the releases cycle, as every stakeholder is given a seat at the table.

      Beyond that, we create playbooks for releases that ensure that our release is as high quality and consistent as the content itself. A playbook documents of the entire lifecycle of a piece of content or a marketing release, plus when and where actions need to take place during that lifecycle.

  • AS

    Anthony Stylianou

    almost 3 years ago #

    Hi Clair, for start ups that are in their pre-launch phase, what advice would you give towards their Twitter strategy in 1) achieving awareness and 2) driving sign-ups?

    Content is key, but are there any lessons you've learnt in the past that you would recommend or even avoid?

    Regards,
    Anthony

    • CB

      Clair Byrd

      almost 3 years ago #

      Hi Anthony! Great to hear from you.

      1. Awareness: Twitter and any other social media is a megaphone. You still have to create things people want to have something to share on social media. So my recommendation would be to work on content first. :) Once you have something to share, use modest budgets (>$50 a day) to slowly increase the reach of your content. You want to become a consistent, regular part of someone’s Twitter feed, but not dominate it.

      Signups: Paid ads on Twitter are okay, but I’m more likely to use Twitter as a retargeting tool rather than a direct response tool. Focus on pulling people back to your brand properties and converting them onsite, where you can retarget and nurture them.

      2. Toss the rulebook and focus on quality. Creating 1 high-quality deliverable is better than creating 100 mildly okay deliverables. Your potential customers are people, and I feel that we forget that sometimes.

  • DH

    Dani Hart

    almost 3 years ago #

    Hi Clair - so awesome to have you here! Can't wait to read all of your responses.

    What's your process for building out content and how is it measured? Do you have a "content stack" that helps you bring everything together?

    Thanks!

    • CB

      Clair Byrd

      almost 3 years ago #

      Hi Dani! We measure content based on the same growth metrics that we measure all marketing initiatives on—net new contacts, leads, and product signups, plus overall revenue.

      We do have a content stack! I call it a "playbook." Happy to share more about this, just email me! clair@invisionapp

  • JD

    Julien DEVOIR

    almost 3 years ago #

    Hi Clair !

    What according to you are the best ways/channels to promote your content nowadays? (especially if you don't have a community yet to help you get the word out and go viral fast and easy)

    • CB

      Clair Byrd

      almost 3 years ago #

      There is no one-size-fits-all answer here. Your best bet is to figure out where your target customer naturally hangs out and invest in developing community there.

      Additionally, you can leverage other networks. Everyone wants more content, so I've found content syndication partnerships to be really useful—getting your content featured in other newsletters or shared and linked to by influencers. Additionally, versioning and republishing your content in places like Medium and Linkedin with built in syndication email flows for their users is a good place to start.

  • AL

    Arsene Lavaux

    almost 3 years ago #

    Bonjour Clair,

    What makes B2B content exceptional?

    Merci!

    • CB

      Clair Byrd

      almost 3 years ago #

      Quality! Quality, quality, quality, quality.

      Quality means: an excellent final deliverable that thoughtfully addresses a previously-unaddressed problem for you target customer.

  • AA

    Anuj Adhiya

    almost 3 years ago #

    Hey Clair - super to have you on!

    My questions relate to the DESIGN DISRUPTORS documentary.

    a. How did the idea to do this come about? Specifically what signal or trigger did you see that told the decision makers at Invision that putting the resource behind this would be worth the time/money/energy?

    b. What factors did the team weigh when considering the documentary vs any other initiative(s) that might have had a similar outcome in a similar timeframe for around the same investment?

    c. How was the documentary itself promoted? What were the most successful channels for you and why do you think those worked better than others?

    d. Overall, what do you think the biggest learning(s) from shepherding this initiative through was for you?

    • CB

      Clair Byrd

      almost 3 years ago #

      Hi Anuj! Thanks for all the great questions.

      A. The idea originally came from our CEO, Clark. He was onsite with some really talented, influential designers, and while they were talking, he simply stated “this is so powerful—I wish we could film this and release it for the design community.” From that simple statement, the idea for a film featuring the brightest design minds of our time and the impact of their contributions was born.

      B. Video is a super power. Very few companies can pull off a fully fledged video strategy and video is an area of differentiation for us. Beyond that, we saw a gap in the market and a place to step away from competition—there was no documentary on the digital design process, full stop, let alone a film produced by a design collaboration platform. We were uniquely placed to make a substantially impact by committing to the full-length film.

      C. We knew we wanted to go as big as possible without completely blowing our budget, which meant going digital and outsourcing quite a bit of the release. We also wanted to be true to the original intent of the film—which was to educate and inspire the design community, so we needed the film to be broadly accessible.

      The distribution strategy was driven by a question “how can we get this film into the hands of the most relevant people?” The foundation of this was data (who we approached, when, why, and how) and communication design (what we communicated, in what cadence, in what form, and at what critical moments).

      On the digital side, we leaned into the viral nature of the film. We invested deeply in creating a multitude of robust social experiences, like micro-video, disruptor profiles, competing for pre-access, allowing organization of community screenings, and lots and lots of built-in sharing functionality—the echo chamber effect was massive.

      On the events side, we focused deeply on creating an exceptionally awesome event experience coupled with a deeply targeted and curated audience. We used these InVision-produced events as case studies to engage partners like to create their own premiere events—again amplifying the film and the brand message through the echo chamber, a “look how sexy this is—you could be this sexy, too” experience.

      We were able to get nearly 5,000 excellent designers into five theaters around the world, and almost 18,000 people into 200+ community events—plus over 75k on a film-specific email list.

      I think the power of the DD release was actually in the deep integration of all channels in the campaign—one channel couldn't have stood alone without the others. They were all necessary to create the viral echo chamber effect which drove the campaign's success.

      D. Don't be afraid of the "moonshot" play.

  • JP

    Jan Pineau

    almost 3 years ago #

    Hello Clair,

    As a Head of marketing, what is the biggest decision that you have ever taken?

    As a super design based platform how do you cope up with the new changes?

  • MS

    Mark Savchuk

    almost 3 years ago #

    Hello Clair,

    Awesome to see you on Growthhackers :)

    I wanted to ask the following:

    How do you think content marketing has changed in the last 3-4 years and where do you think it's going in the next 203 years?

    Thank you.
    Mark

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