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Prabhjot is a serial entrepreneur with over 15 years of experience in executive management, marketing, sales, and operations. His particular area of expertise lies in mobile applications -as a former and deeply experienced app developer, Prabhjot is an expert on how to create apps that gain large amounts of traction, on the scale of millions of users. 

In 2013, Prabhjot co-founded Pyze, a mobile business intelligence platform that aims to help all app publishers become successful in developing healthy app businesses. The app market is currently dominated by a select few mobile app publishers who generate millions of dollars a day, while the vast majority make less than $500 a month. Pyze gives this majority, which spans across Fortune 1,000 companies and indie app developers, the same intelligence driven services they need to compete with the select few big players dominating the industry.

Previously, Prabhjot co-founded Pixatel Systems, a social enterprise that seeks to improve the quality of education in developing countries, with a focus on basic skills and literacy. Before that, he served as vice president of marketing for CA Technologies’ Application Performance Management (APM) business. 

Follow Prabhjot on Twitter @psinghSF or connect with him on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/psinghsf

He will be live on September 15 starting 930 AM PT for one and a half hours during which he will answer as many questions as possible.

  • LS

    Logan Stoneman

    6 months ago #

    Hey Prabhjot - I have been fascinated by the addicting quality of some gaming apps, Pokemon Go specifically. Many people have cited psychological theories such as Nir Eyal's "Hooked". Can you share any other theories on what get's users 'hooked', causing traction and scaling? Are there any other philosophies you build into your apps to give it a higher propensity for success?

    • PS

      Prabhjot Singh

      6 months ago #

      Logan, thanks for this great question. Given the amount of competition on the app store, this is interestingly a topic that doesn’t get nearly the amount of attention it deserves. At the core of any of the psychological theories being used in the most addictive games and social apps is: Sustained Motivation. Basically, what causes a person to repeat a behavior again and again? Whether it's facebook, Kim Kardashian, Pokemon or Candy Crush, there are deep psychological constructs at work that drive the urge to keep coming back.

      I am a big fan of Nir and his book Hooked. His discussion on Pavlovian conditioning and variable reward as it relates to the desire to put in more effort in the hopes of a greater reward is fascinating. Once you get a user into the loop of wanting to put in effort in anticipation of a reward, and appreciating there is more reward for putting in more effort again, you have them… hooked.

      There is lots of academic literature on intrinsic and extrinsic motivation (you need a mix of both). When we’re looking to build gamification into an app, there are basically three key aspects of motivation that we care about: Autonomy, Value and Competence. Check out this lifehacker article by Thorin Klosowski I have bookmarked for more details if you don’t want to read the more heavier journal articles on the topic. (https://lifehacker.com/the-psychology-of-gamification-can-apps-keep-you-motiv-1521754385)

      The best games tap into your intrinsic motivation while providing extrinsic rewards. Motivation also comes from friendly competition and lots of studies show that competition positively motivates some people. Depending on the app you’re trying to build, you’ll want to drill in deeper, whether its Incentive Theory for optimizing rewards in a game or Content Theory for a social app, it's really important to understand how your app is going to create an addictive effect. The big players in the app market are hiring psychologists and data scientists so it’s important to bake the right psychological level into your app for sustained motivation.

      I also suggest checking out the Ted Talk by Tom Chatfield on “7 ways video games engage the brain,” that is referenced in the Lifehacker article for a discussion on how these psychological theories have been successfully utilized in video games for a very long time. Definitely worth your time.

      • VW

        Vibhushan Waghamre

        6 months ago #

        Hi Prabhjot,

        Thanks for these amazing insights.

        Besides the motivation, I found that "achievability" is a very important factor for user-engagement. At every given moment in the game's journey, user should always feel that he can achieve the target. In the TED Talk by Tom, he talks about probability of reward. Especially for games like 2048, users are always made to feel that the elusive goal is just round the corner, which makes them keep playing on for hours together. I believe this is different from positive rewards at every regular intervals, and can be dug deeper into to drive engagement.

  • RB

    Ry B

    6 months ago #

    Hi Prabhjot,

    Thanks for being here!

    1)Can you talk about some of the challenges of scaling Pyze and how you overcame said issues?

    2)How do you look at hiring? Can you talk about some of the mistakes you've made hiring (and also seen others make)? What have you learned about hiring A+ talents?

    3)How do you look at balance in your professional and personal life? When it comes to work, how do you decide what you have to work on today (I'm sure you have a lot of fires to put out every day)?

    4)How do you look at competition, specifically when you're going up against bigger, and better-funded competitors? How does that affect your strategic plan, if it does at all? What is your mindset when you go to compete against the 800-pound gorillas of the business intelligence space?

    Thanks

    • PS

      Prabhjot Singh

      6 months ago #

      2) Hiring is the most important responsibility of any founder. One bad hire in the early days of a start-up can sink your company. The biggest mistakes I’ve made around hiring are on-boarding too quickly even when I wasn’t 100% sold because we were under the gun to get product shipped or get more traction, or whatever. Those hires almost never worked out. The mistake that I’ve seen others make often is not recognizing that they made a bad hire and confusing activity with progress. This is why it’s important to take your time hiring because it’s not fair to the person you hired either if you have inflated expectations beyond their capabilities.

      But generally, as the basics go, hire A+ players. People who think and know will be able to do the job better than you could. If it’s a domain area that you don’t know about, lets say its a Sales job and you have a product background, get someone with the relevant domain experience to interview. And don’t hire B players. That is the path to sunsetting your startup.

      3) It’s very hard to maintain balance in our start-up world. It is all consuming but I’m a big believer in trying to maintain balance, though my wife might argue that point. We sacrifice a lot to make our startups successful. The one thing that isn’t worth sacrificing is family life, whatever that looks like for you. So, yes. There are days or weeks when I am working non-stop morning to night but I’ll make sure I’ll take some time on the weekend to do a hike or BBQ. I recently even joined a gym and can definitely see the uptick in my productivity.

      As far as what I work on daily, it’s really a mixed bag. It might be working on a new product feature, prototyping functionality, raising money, dealing with an HR issue or writing a contract. I do manage by lists and I have my own prioritization system. When possible, I’ll try to group domain oriented tasks together as context switches are expensive. That helps.

      8 Share
      • PS

        Prabhjot Singh

        6 months ago #

        Anuj, that is a fair point. Convincing someone to give up a comfortable or well-paying position to join something unproven is quite the sales exercise. Sure, you can promise them lots of stock but the stock is fairly meaningless early on. The founders really have to believe and be able to convince your would-be employees that the journey is worth it, it will be transformative for them, and you will change the world, in a small or big way. Early employees have to drink the koolaid as much as the founders and be completely sold on the mission.

      • AA

        Anuj Adhiya

        6 months ago #

        re: hiring A+ players.
        This is clearly a challenge in the early days/being pre-revenue etc
        What strategies do you think work best to convince A+ players - who might already well-settled somewhere to leave all of that and come work for your startup and take on uncertainty over stability?

      • DM

        David Milberg

        6 months ago #

        "The mistake that I’ve seen others make often is not recognizing that they made a bad hire and confusing activity with progress." I love this. So true

    • PS

      Prabhjot Singh

      6 months ago #

      Ry, always great to think about these topics. I can tell by the questions that you’re a fellow entrepreneur!

      1) When we started Pyze three years ago, the gross majority of app publishers had poor visibility into their app’s user base and lacked the tools to engage with their users. Sadly, the world hasn’t changed too much since then. The app stores have even more competition today and the intelligence tools that the top 1% of app publishers use to target and retarget users are light years ahead of the basic mobile analytics tools out there.

      For us, the key focus from the beginning was on the product and being able to solve the customer problem. We wanted to build a solution that could be accessible to all app publishers, both from a cost and usability perspective, basically an app publisher wouldn’t need to spend thousands of dollars a month and wouldn’t need a PhD in Data Science. Building the Pyze Platform out took us about 2 years, including a solid Beta. We needed to be able to offer sophisticated intelligence and bake in mobile marketing automation like push and in-app messaging -- all for free. We went through lot of iterations on our technology stack to arrive at our current architecture so we could scale the business. As a result, we now have a very scalable platform that supports our business model. I do think building the platform alongside some real apps and doing an alpha and a beta that tested our assumptions, and incorporating the feedback from customers, was critical to us getting to where we are today.

    • PS

      Prabhjot Singh

      6 months ago #

      4) Competition doesn’t keep me up at night, making our product as good as it possibly can be does. We know what the strengths and the disadvantages of the 800 pound gorillas are. The only way we beat them is by continuously innovating, responding to customer feedback, and out executing them at every step. I am not worried about how their marketing message is changing or the new feature they are pre-announcing. We’re all about the Pepsi challenge. Bring it, all day and all night long.

      Thanks again for the questions and best of luck on your pursuits!

      • RB

        Ry B

        6 months ago #

        Thanks Prabhjot! Great stuff here. Best of luck to you on your journey with pyze!

  • PS

    Prabhjot Singh

    6 months ago #

    Hi All, our time is up but I will keep responding to the large number of great questions that were asked. So expect to see some more answers over the next day. If you have any questions tweet at me at @psinghSF

  • DH

    Dani Hart

    6 months ago #

    Hi Prabhjot,

    Thanks for spending your time here with us.

    Do you have any advice when it comes to merchandizing apps? Have you seen any trends in what works and what doesn't in terms of getting users to download and use the app? How much attention is paid to the acquisition of users during the development of the app itself?

    Looking forward to hearing what you have to say!

    Cheers,
    Dani

    • PS

      Prabhjot Singh

      6 months ago #

      Hi Dani,

      Thanks for joining me! I’m often surprised seeing new developers neglecting the basics - e.g. strong title, compelling description with the right keywords, screenshots and videos in the app store, clear and inviting icon, etc. Given the amount of apps out there, without basic blocking and tackling, its going to be difficult for apps to get noticed.

      65% of apps are discovered in the app store. Use app store optimization techniques and also keep up with the changes (for example, recently Apple changes the number of characters you can use in titles). The metadata that you define for apps as part of ASO is also used Search Ads. That also means 35% of apps are discovered by word of mouth, good old marketing and advertising.

      We blogged about new and existing ways to raise awareness here: https://blog.pyze.com/2016/06/18/search-ads-existing-ways-to-get-noticed-on-ios-app-store/

      I’ll also highlight that the new-user onboarding experience is *very* important, and at Pyze we’ve seen that developers who optimize the first 3-4 screens get better traction with new users. Uninstalls happen a lot faster than you think, especially in younger demographics. Onboarding Tours or custom engagement points via push and in-app to push behavior, and personalizing the user’s experience based on behavior/ profile will really help in getting users to build a relationship with the app.

      I am big believer in building in the right viral loop to get your users working for you on the acquisition front. This is not possible for every app but thinking through and designing ways to attract new users, whether it’s via contacts or friends or Pokemon type real world engagement, will go a long way to creating stickiness for existing users and reducing your user acquisition cost substantially.

      PokeMon Go has uniquely mastered the viral loop. We blogged about it here: https://blog.pyze.com/2016/07/29/4-ways-pokemon-go-masters-the-viral-loop/

  • AA

    Aldin A

    6 months ago #

    Prabjhot,

    Excited to have you here and learn from you!

    1)What, in your opinion, are the top qualities founders need to succeed?

    2)How do you go about empowering employees? What does empowerment look like at Pyze? How do you instill an ownership mentality in them?

    3)What do you think are the top skills/traits that a manager needs to have to bring out the best in their employees?

    4)Aside from growth hackers can you mention some of the resources you used to learn and stay up to date with growth, marketing, and business? Books, podcasts, blogs, courses etc?

    Thanks!

  • ES

    Edward Stephens

    6 months ago #

    Amazing background Prabhjot!

    Looking forward to this one - big time!

    1) What do you make of Apples iOS 10 update permitting apps to be built for iMessage? Do you think this is too little too late for them to compete with WhatsApp and Telegram? Do you think any of the major messenger platforms can recreate what WeChat have in China?

    2) Based on Pixatel Systems how quickly do you think smart phone can help make significant impact in developing countries and how have you seen this change already?

    3) Should entrepreneurs looking to bootstrap sometimes create mobile friendly sites/web apps in React.js instead of forking out for full mobile solutions?

    I can't wait to hear your answers!

    • PS

      Prabhjot Singh

      6 months ago #

      Thanks Edward. These are all deep questions and we’re running out of time so I will take a quick shot at answering them and we can continue the conversation later.

      1) Messaging as a platform has gained significant momentum. We talked about the messging platform, bots and apps line LINE, WeChat, WhatsApp and Messenger in http://pyze.com/articles/app-messaging-yesterday-vs-today-and-tomorrow.html

      Apple in particular is late into the game with iMessage Apps, but their large install base will let them catch up quickly. I’m always impressed with how much focus on great experience and attention to detail in put into their solutions. The introduction of iMessage App store, ability to create sticker packs without programming knowledge should be instrumental in growing the iMessage app market. We are seeing numerous developers are already implementing iMessage App extensions.

      2) Smartphones and Tablets are already creating substantial change in developing countries across critical sectors like Education, Healthcare, Commerce and Payments. There are lot of startups that are leveraging the mobile revolution to create sustainable change so children can learn at their own pace or farmers can understand which market will give them the best rate for their crops.
      The a key challenge in developing countries is that there isn’t too much opportunity for intergenerational mobility. As our work at Pixatel shows, giving children access to the same sophisticated software as is available western countries, we find children are learning better and this opens up a world of opportunity for them. Mobile has made the world much smaller and these same children can not only learn using mobile apps but in the future also create them and commercialize them to a market of billions. Stay tuned, the mobile revolution is just getting started.

      3) Javascript libraries like React.js and even gaming platforms like Unity make it easy for app publishers to quickly reuse their knowledge and bring an app to market on multiple platforms. However, sometimes it may not be the best solution because it provides a limited experience vs. native apps. So depending on your app, React may be fine. But keep in mind it is a large library, not as mature as angular and only supports views. Native apps always offer the best experiences and you can take advantage of latest environments. You have access to device sensors, Apple Pay, Camera, Bluetooth, etc and you control the end-to-end experience. For simple apps, react.js works well. In certain cases, app publishers start with a javascript framework, gather feedback and switch to a native app once they know exactly what they are building.

  • AL

    Arsene Lavaux

    7 months ago #

    Bonjour Prabhjot,

    Thank you for doing this AMA in the best growth hacking community on the planet :)

    A few questions for you:

    1) As an app developer, what is the one thing you need to do right to distribute your app in a sustainable way?

    2) Do you believe mobile growth core principles apply to improving education in the world? If so, which ones?

    3) Where do you see the future of mobile going?

    Merci!

    • PS

      Prabhjot Singh

      6 months ago #

      3) Mobile is already penetrating every aspect of our life. We’re already using mobile to order Pizza or a ride. Certainly, it’s going to continue to cannibalize a lot of industries from commerce to advertising to payments but it’s also going to become the primary channel for accessing a lot of web centric services today. There are a lot of enterprises still struggling to adapt to mobile and those that can’t are really not positioned well for success.

      We are already seeing Mobile fusing with Augmented Reality, IoT, and AI (in different ways of course) to create a brave new world. This is a much longer conversation point. I’ll say this, mobile is definitely a larger shift than Web was from the Client-Server days. And not only are we in early days, the technologies that are maturing alongside mobile are going to give rise to both amazing and scary prospects for the future.

    • PS

      Prabhjot Singh

      6 months ago #

      Hi Arsene, thanks for your questions.

      1) Sustainable distribution has a lot to do with the Addressable Market Size for your application. Most app publishers don’t take advantage of the true distribution power of the App Store or Google Play and are too “home” centric in their thinking. Fast-growing markets such as Japan, Brazil, India can make your app successful, even if it’s doing poorly at home.

      At Pyze we’ve heard from a number of developers after they start using us and are shocked to find out how many users are coming from India or Brazil. Just by localizing the app in the locales where it's getting traction, you can significantly increase usage and retention. Check out this blog on localization: https://blog.pyze.com/2016/06/08/china-and-india-surpasses-us-internet-users-what-it-means-for-app-publishers/

      There are also non-app store distribution channels, which I am happy to follow-up on offline and I have had a lot of success with OEM preloads in the past, but those aren’t going to be right for every app.

      The one caveat I’ll mention is don’t blow your addressable market before you achieve product-market fit. It’s critical to get users loving the app, just like you would for any product, before you start to scale distribution. Else, the end result won’t be pretty.

      2) I believe that improving education is almost exactly like growth principles. Not everyone learns the same, and in the exact same way not everyone uses an app in the same way. The people that excel in both fields should not get the same attention, either by the developer OR the teacher, and those that are lagging behind, be it in class or usage of the app, should get a little more attention - this could be in the form of personal tutoring by the teacher, or a push notification from the app to get the user coming back. At Pixatel, we’ve created an adaptive learning platform to help students of all learning levels achieve their full potential and also built in gamification into the platform to encourage friendly competition and the desire to excel. I’m a big believer that this is the future of education.

  • MM

    martín medina

    6 months ago #

    Prabhjot,

    Thanks for coming on here and doing this AMA.

    What are you most excited about regarding the future of mobile growth?

    What are some challenges you face when working in the mobile space?

    What are some categories of apps that you have seen that are most popular? What kinds of apps are your favorite to work with?

    • PS

      Prabhjot Singh

      6 months ago #

      Martin, thanks for the questions!

      1) Mobile is already having a significant impact in our lives today. Mobile will disrupt a lot of industries as I mentioned in response to Arsene’s question but what gets me most excited is the opportunity Mobile presents to globally enhance Education and tear down the digital divide.
      Advances in deep learning, artificial intelligence and conversational user interfaces are making our mobile devices much more accessible and user friendly than ever before.

      2) The biggest challenge in working on the mobile space is getting above the noise in the app store. Just because you build it and the app store has billions of users does not mean they will come. The app world is getting more and more competitive and the app store is getting more and more corporatized. In the early days, it was easy for any indie app developer to become successful. However, today, the big guys are running the Board. So, building and launching a new app has to be done methodically, leveraging core app design and app growth principles so you get to product-market fit quickly and start to scale the app.

      3) I don’t discriminate when it comes to apps. I have worked with apps across games, educational, social, m-commerce. Each app is unique in what it takes to make it successful and achieve product-market fit. I love that challenge.

  • SA

    Shaker A

    6 months ago #

    Hey Prabhjot,

    Great to have you here.

    1) How do you define short term and long term growth goals? How do you differentiate which growth goals should be long term vs. short term? Lastly, how do you balance your priorities between the two types of goals?

    2) What are the most valuable lessons you've learned in your career about growth and business in general?

    3) In your opinion what are things early stage startups have to do to not only survive, but thrive? Conversely what do you see startups messing up that they can't afford to, and how do they fix them?

    Thanks

    • PS

      Prabhjot Singh

      6 months ago #

      Shaker, great questions.

      1) Everyday matters in the life of a startup. In early days, its important to look at short term goals in the context of weeks and long term goals in the context of a quarter. This obviously shifts as your business starts to scale and mature. There is a clear hierarchy between long term and short term goals. The latter have to feed into the former. If you do that, the alignment of prioritization and balance starts to happen automatically. There are lots and lots of project management tools out there to help but basically tracking priority and status against deadlines is critical to ensure success.

      2) There are lots of lessons (good and bad) that I’ve learned along the way. The couple of key lessons I’ve learned are 1) there are no shortcuts for success and 2) working smart is infinitely more important than just working hard. Lots and lot of business books out there that speak to the value of these lessons. If you look at Founder stories (Founders at Work for example), you’ll see these themes reiterated again and again. I can go thru my own experiences in detail, maybe over a cup of coffee.

      3) I am believer in Lean. Startups have to ***follow***, not just say they are following Lean principles. That means working towards Product Market Fit in concert with customers so that you know you’re solving an actual pain point that someone, somewhere, sometime will pay you for. Without that, it's a recipe for disaster. Then of course building out the right commercialization model and go-to-market is critical for success. This is also an area that most startups don’t spend enough time on and exhaust runway for the iterations required for success.

      8 Share
  • VM

    vivek muralee

    6 months ago #

    Hi Prabhjot

    Nice of you to spare some time for this AMA.

    1)What has been your biggest lesson from co-founding Pixatel?
    2)According to you,what is the main mistake that most app developers make while trying to market their apps?
    3)What do you see as the most effective metric to measure marketing campaign success ?
    4)What is the one motto that you live your entrepreneurial life by?
    All the best Prabhjot

  • AA

    Anuj Adhiya

    6 months ago #

    Hey Prabhjot - great to have you on!

    A short while back I read this post: https://medium.com/@gabrielmachuret/blackhat-app-store-optimization-who-is-scared-of-the-big-bad-stupid-algorithm-c732d895acd6#.g1dguz8w0
    It spoke about the prevalence of Black Hat ASO and it being the primary route through which App store rankings etc were being achieved.
    What's your take on all of this?

    • PS

      Prabhjot Singh

      6 months ago #

      The conversation around black-hat and white-hat techniques is not a new one. There is a fine line between the approaches and depends on where you want to be in the spectrum: fully legal and compliant, to ethical, to using vulnerabilities of the App Store to promote your app or service. Regardless, black-hat techniques are generally very short-lived and have to continuously adapt, while white-hat techniques continue to benefit for extended periods of time.

      Growth hacking apps is part-art and part-science. The art being the need to try approaches to find out what works. It includes creativity and adopting a different kind of mindset based on frequent experimentation, testing, and data. The science being the insights, data-science and intelligence available to a Growth hacker, that firstly, provides confidence in every decision, strategy, campaign, experiment and approach undertaken, secondly reveals the success and lifespan of that hack and lastly, gives an indication on when to pull the plug on a growth hack that has outlived it’s lifespan or failed to deliver optimal user growth results.

      I’ll also add that ASO is not the holy grail anymore. The other thing to keep in mind is that app stores are more and more relying on usage and engagement metrics for discovery and these are also key factors in Search Ads. This is why Growth Hackers need Growth Intelligence to ensure their app is successul in the long run: http://pyze.com/articles/growth-hackers-need-growth-intelligence.html

  • RB

    Ry B

    6 months ago #

    Hi Prabhjot,

    You mentioned that you've worked on m-commerce apps before.

    -What did you find were the keys to making sure that the m-commerce apps you worked on were successful not only in terms of getting distribution, but also in it's revenue generating potential?

    Thanks

  • JD

    Jesse Dawson

    6 months ago #

    Hi Prabhjot, thanks for spending time with us today. Can you speak to personalization in apps. What type of personalization strategies do you recommend and what kind of a difference can they make in growing an app’s userbase?

    • PS

      Prabhjot Singh

      6 months ago #

      Personalization is critical for success in today’s hyper-competitive app world. This is one of the key things that separates the super successful apps from the rest of the pack. I look at personalization in two ways: 1) personalizing experience and 2) personalizing engagement. Personalization should be based on each individual user's’ behaviors, preferences, social graph data, locations and context. This effort has a significant impact on engagement, retention and satisfaction, and is the key differentiator between great and good apps.

      Re., experience, App Publishers and Marketers can personalize user interfaces, content feeds, user experiences, all communication messages, feature and product promotions, and In-App purchase promotions, uniquely to each user.

      For example, apps should offer individualized experiences to Experts vs. Novice Users, High Value vs. Dormant Users, etc. As another example, if I am either new to an app or have not used the app for an extended period of time, I can be shown a simpler wizard-like user interface, but If use the app every day, I may prefer an advanced spreadsheet-like interface.

      Re. engagement, it's critical for an app to develop a meaningful relationship with each user. The apps that I use often, regularly interact with me, without spamming me. So, it's important to personalize engagement with each user based on their lifecycle, milestones or behavior so you can drive desired actions. I recommend reading this blog on behavioral intelligence for context: https://blog.pyze.com/2016/09/06/behavioral-intelligence-for-marketers/

      7 Share
  • JF

    Javier Feldman

    6 months ago #

    Hi Prabhjot, it's great to have you here today!

    Can you talk about one growth experiment that was either a very big win or provided a critical insight?

    Thanks in advance!

  • BW

    Brand Winnie

    6 months ago #

    Hey Prabhjot,

    What metrics do you look at to consider a Pyze user activated? What strategies have you found to work best to increase your activation rate?

    Thanks!
    -Brand

  • DO

    Danielle Olivas

    6 months ago #

    Hi, Prabhjot!

    Can you point to a startup/company of whose mobile app growth you've been really impressed by? Why do you think they've been so successful? What are they doing that others are not (or aren't doing as well)?

    Thanks in advance!

    • PS

      Prabhjot Singh

      6 months ago #

      Hi Danielle, thanks for your question.

      The way PokeMon Go has combined augmented reality with gaming to offer personalized experiences is extremely impressive and spurred tremendous growth and revenue.

      See my answer to Dani Hart’s question above regarding PokeMon Go’s unique approach to virality. This app is going to become a good model for others are we move forward.

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