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Currently, I serve as the VP of Industry Relations at Placester, where I help build relationships to create large scale growth opportunities. Focusing on brand positioning and evangelism, new markets, strategic alliances, partnerships and business development. I travel the country evangelizing our company, culture, and platform.  

I’ve recently authored a new book, The Road to Recognition, An A-to-Z Guide to Personal Branding (with Barry Feldman), a hands-on primer about how everyone can jumpstart their professional success by leveraging their personal brand. 

I joined Placester as the first non-engineer to help bring our product to market. I focused on evangelizing a new way for real estate professionals to market themselves online and off.  My goal was to grow our customer base and learn more about our audience by teaching how to apply the why what and how of digital marketing in the complex world of residential real estate. 

As the #3 hire at Placester, I've have worn all of the go-to-market hats and helped the company build a 450,000 plus customer base in less than five years, through four rounds of venture funding, two acquisitions, and triple-digit revenue growth.

I designed, deployed and drove adoption of our Real Estate Marketing Academy which has evolved into of one of the most successful online education portals in the residential real estate industry and our most successful demand gen channel. I traveled extensively delivering Personal Branding and Marketing Strategy keynote speeches and workshops to the various industry conferences throughout the United States and Canada, including NAR, Inman, RE/MAX, C21, XPlode & Berkshire Hathaway conferences as well as countless association events. 

Relationship building and partnership creation have been instrumental to our accelerated growth. Beginning with our team, where 100% of the colleagues that I was responsible for hiring, have experienced career growth and moved into leadership positions within our company. 

Followed closely by our strategic partnerships, including, the National Association of REALTORS, the largest trade association in the world, Hearst Media and Keller Williams Realty International, the number 1 real estate franchises in the world by agent count.

Find out more about Seth at http://sethprice.net, the book at http://theroadtorecognition.com and Twitter @sethprice

He will be live on Oct 13 starting at 930 AM PT for one and a half hours during which he will answer as many questions as possible.

  • AA

    Aldin A

    4 months ago #

    Hey Seth,

    Great to have you here at GH!

    1)What, in your opinion, are the top qualities founders need to succeed?

    2)How do you go about empowering employees? What does empowerment look like at Placester? How do you instill an ownership mentality in them?

    3)What do you think are the top skills/traits that a manager needs to have to bring out the best in their employees?

    4)Can you name some of your favorite resources? (Books, courses, podcasts, blogs, etc)

    Thanks

    • SP

      Seth Price

      4 months ago #

      The best founders are...

      - Relentless in their drive
      - Thick skinned, meaning they've learned to take no without losing momentum.
      - They love the chess game and are thinking 3,4 and 5 moves ahead.
      - Master salesman saleswoman i.e. can inspire others to believe in them and follow them without proof or product which is where we all start. We are always selling without selling, to partners, investors, clients, and employees, friends and family.
      - Have the skill of compartmentalization, without this, the stress will cause health and performance issues
      - Are good at saying no, even to great ideas.
      - Able to confront and address performance issues immediately.
      - Skilled at choosing excellent talent and holding them accountable

      2 Share
  • SA

    Shaker A

    4 months ago #

    Hi Seth,

    Thanks for doing this ama!

    1) When you're doing biz dev how do compensate if you don't have a prior track record of success to show prospective partners? Ex If you are a young founder straight out of school, a lot of times you don't have a track record to show as a sign of your experience, since you don't have much exp to begin with at this stage. If I wanted to form partnerships with other businesses the only thing I know that I could sell them on are a solid value proposition and hope they overlook my lack of experience. If you didn't have the experience and the track record to show, how would you compensate for those things when trying to close a sale or partnership?

    2) What are the most valuable lessons you've learned in your career?

    3) In your opinion what are things early stage startups have to do to not only survive, but thrive? Conversely what do you see startups messing up that they can't afford to, and how do they fix them?

    Thanks

    • SP

      Seth Price

      4 months ago #

      The most valuable assets I have are grit and perseverance. I can almost guarantee that what I know today will not be enough, for me to succeed tomorrow. Often the difference between those that win and those that lose is the tenacity to continue.

      3 Share
    • SP

      Seth Price

      4 months ago #

      First, let me start by saying that experience is often over-rated. But let's begin with how you establish credibility. Having a strong personal brand puts you in the driver's seat when it comes to business development. Start with the following -

      Experts to Model - Who is crushing it in your niche or does the things you would like to do in the way you aspire to?

      Gatekeepers - Who are the decision makers for you to get to the decision makers?

      Micro Niche - If you could boil down your specialization to be distinct from others in your field, what would it be?

      Key Connection Channels - How do you best connect with the participants in this niche? Conferences, social media, events, blogs, email?

      Your Super Power - What are you exceptional at or aspire to be better at than anybody else in your field?

      Influencers - Who do you look up to and who does everyone else look up to in your field?

      Your Differentiation - What makes you different from others in your profession?

      Expertise - . What topics are you a “local expert” in—that is, not necessarily the best in the world, but better or more knowledgeable than those around you?

      Recurring Brand Building Activity - What authority creation activity can you do regularly to enhance and showcase your subject matter expertise? Authorship, Blogging, Podcasting, Public Speaking, Committee participation. Do this, rinse, repeat and don't stop.

      Existing Conversations - What books, Web sites, conferences or podcasts are leading the conversation about your niche?

      Educational Superpower - How can you help others in your field do things better or more efficiently?

      2 Share
  • MR

    Metro Roberts

    4 months ago #

    Hi, Seth! So great to talk with you. Thank you!

    Our question is about blogging. In a world where content is everywhere, how do you stand out? Sometimes blogging can feel like you're performing without an audience, and I'm just wondering if you have any tips on getting a blog off the ground. I know it's important to provide quality copy and a fresh perspective, but once it is written, what ways do you promote blog content to get the most impact? Any tips are appreciated! Thank you!!!

  • AH

    Agnes Haryuni

    5 months ago #

    Hey Seth,

    An "interview" question for you.
    If u have to sell tacos in Mexico, what do you do? How would you promote/differentiate your business?

    • SP

      Seth Price

      4 months ago #

      Branding is about differentiation, starting with asking some important questions.
      - What’s my special sauce or in this case, taco? Why are your taco's worth eating and how are they different than your competitors. craft, flavor, price, speed, scarcity, design, drama, story.
      - Make a list of at least five super successful taco establishments that you follow and respect. Spend some time examining them. How are they alike? How are they different? What about their character intrigues you? Often what we admire is what we aspire to be. This is about modeling, not copying.
      - Who is the most important audience that your taco brand needs to speak to? Everything that you create and everything you say in the public domain will be discoverable online. Word of mouth and word of mouse. By identifying and communicating with your most important audience, you'll know who you don't have to cook for and please..

      Lastly, make a taco worth remembering. You know the meal you dream about, and can't wait to get back to. I have those experiences in every city I travel to speak in . My favorite restaurant, coffee, taco, sushi. Make it memorable and make it an experience

      3 Share
      • AA

        Anuj Adhiya

        4 months ago #

        "Word of mouth and word of mouse" - now that's a phrase I haven't heard before - stealing it!

  • AL

    Arsene Lavaux

    4 months ago #

    Hi Seth,

    Thanks for doing this AMA.

    1) Do you see a big buyer pain point in the residential real estate market?

    2) Same question for the residential real estate agent.

    Merci!

    • SP

      Seth Price

      4 months ago #

      There's a huge pain point in residential real estate in that the digital experience hasn't caught up with digital expectations. The data is pay-walled, siloed and difficult for the consumer to parse through. Then add that to the fact that they need to collaborate with other professionals to help them get the highest and best value. From REALTORS and Title to mortgage and the sellers representative. The best real estate professionals today are migrating to platforms that help them create a seamless experience for the consumer, increase transparency, facilitate coordination and provide added insight for the consumer to make the best decisions possible from both a financial and quality of life perspective.

      • AA

        Anuj Adhiya

        4 months ago #

        Can you think of any other industry/vertical where the same applies ie., the digital experience hasn't caught up with digital expectations?

      • SP

        Seth Price

        4 months ago #

        Anuj, we are seeing the verticalization of solutions across the spectrum. Let's take CRM for example. We focus on the residential real estate which is a niche poorly served by the likes of Hubspot or Salesforce because they don't go deep enough into the exact data sets, workflows and personas in this industry. Some are verticals experiencing the same expectations gap, Medical, Dental, Home Contractors, Home Services (Plumbing, HVAC, Roofing, Lawncare) It's not that there aren't solutions out there, it's that they don't go deep enough. When we build software we often think it's for the DIY customer, but businesses today need DIFM, they don't have time to write custom emails for the automation, they don't have time to set up their website, no matter how easy you make it. That's where the blue ocean is, self-learning tools that are plug and play. Adapting to the consumer and the business owners. We all need an assistant. We see it in how Apple and Google are programmatically creating slideshows and movies. The tools were always great, but for the masses to actually use them, they have to do much of the heavy lifting without interference.

      • AA

        Anuj Adhiya

        4 months ago #

        @sethprice That is a super observation.
        I certainly see the trend of verticalization everywhere (heck, our own tool ,Projects is a more purpose-built system for managing growth that is currently shoe-horned into other horizontal tools by many).

        Loved the observation on DIY vs DIFM as well.

    • SP

      Seth Price

      4 months ago #

      Real Estate Professional are experiencing pain like countless other service professions in today's marketplace. Professionals have to wear more hats than ever before. Not only do they need to be good at their craft, they need to be a good businessperson and a better marketer. The competition today is for the attention of the consumer. We are all 2 clicks away from obscurity at any moment. Those that grasp this and invest in their marketing and service infrastructure are finding themselves in the top 20% of performance. You need marketing automation, smart websites, engaging and unique content. Social, paid and unpaid. Marketing today is a science with some art. And this needs to be done in a way that allows you, the professional to do what you do best, which is serve the customer, provide stewardship and counsel to help them buy and sell their homes.

  • RB

    Ry B

    4 months ago #

    Seth,

    Thanks for doing this AMA.

    1)Can you talk about some of the challenges of scaling Placester and how you overcame said issues?

    2)How do you look at hiring? Can you talk about some of the mistakes you've made hiring (and also seen others make)? What have you learned about hiring A+ talents?

    3)How do you look at balance in your professional and personal life? When it comes to work, how do you decide what you have to work on today (I'm sure you have a lot of fires to put out every day)?

    4)How do you look at competition, specifically when you're going up against bigger, and better-funded competitors? How does that affect your strategic plan, if it does at all? What is your mindset when you go to compete against the 800-pound gorillas of the business intelligence space?

    Thanks

    • SP

      Seth Price

      4 months ago #

      Ry, We've had plenty of challenges scaling Placester.
      In the first year, we had to figure out a way to get attention before we had a product with little to no marketing budget. (we spent zero on advertising in the first 2 years). We generally knew when we would launch our real estate website and CRM product but we needed to launch with a bang and that required and audience that at the time didn't know we existed. To accomplish that we did four things.

      - Cold called our target audience, focused primarily on influencers. The goal was to get as much insight as possible on the pain that we were attempting to solve and build relationship at the same time.
      - We strategically did validation sales to influencers identified in the influencer outreach. Building/coding their solution by hand since the SAAS product wasn't complete yet.
      - We launched an education portal (blog) with 60 pieces of content to help our audience succeed at marketing. http://placester.com/academy/ including interviews with many of the influencers from our initial outreach.
      - We poured excessive hours into the early sales at a loss to create advocates and raving fans.

      2 Share
    • SP

      Seth Price

      4 months ago #

      Work life balance is a very personal question of which the answer changes with the circumstances and opportunity.

      If you are not in a relationship, then all you need to do is stay healthy and sane until your business can survive without you.

      If you are in a relationship, you have to be honest with your mate. That is, if you value them as your partner.

      I made a deal with my wife that I would give everything to Placester for 5 years thought our series C, then I would ease up a bit. I believed in the opportunity and co-founders that much.

      My wife is a special woman and shouldered much of the burden of me being MIA with my work wives, the co-founders, Frederick Townes & Matt Barba.

      There was a time in the first 3 years where I would arrive at the office at 4:30AM and leave after 8PM. It was necessary at the time. Not sustainable forever, but valuable when what you have to fill the gaps is human effort.

      The last thing I would say is even if you aren't home a lot, figure out ways to be present when you are, be giving, nurturing and open to listen. I cooked every meal when I was home. I set a calendar event to buy flowers for my wife every week and called her twice a day. A breakup during a startup can be a non-starter. Wasting everthing you've worked to create.

      2 Share
      • AA

        Anuj Adhiya

        4 months ago #

        THIS!
        Everyone who wants to become a startup founder or play an integral part in getting a startup off the ground should read this imo.

  • JP

    John Phamvan

    4 months ago #

    Hi Seth,

    Thanks for doing this AMA!

    Having worn so many marketing hats, which one has been the most challenging and why? What do you wish you knew earlier before stepping into that role?

    Thanks,
    John

    • SP

      Seth Price

      4 months ago #

      John, The most challenging part of a startup is choosing the right partners with the right market. You can't do this alone and when you are responsible for go-to-market, you need to trust that your co-founders have your back. Mostly because you're selling ahead of the company's ability to deliver. Your communication has to be honest, direct and constant because many of the decisions you make in the early days to pursue opportunity can make or break you in the future. Now conversely, they (your partners or founders) need to trust you because things are going too fast to micromanage, you don't have the processes in place, nor do you have the time or market insight yet to create them

      It is the most common mistake we make is to choose an opportunity or partner out of convenience. You have to be very critical up front when you decide to join a startup. You are signing up for a marriage without any of the fringe benefits, so it better be worth it.

      2 Share
  • TN

    Tri Nguyen

    4 months ago #

    What advice would you have for newer startups about developing strategic partnerships with bigger companies? What's the biggest mistake you think most startups make?

    • SP

      Seth Price

      4 months ago #

      Tri, You need to think about strategic partnerships like a pyramid. At the bottom are the small partnerships you need to form to gain credibility with the partnerships at the top. This is what I call influencer sales and influencer marketing.

      - Start by making a list of partnerships that you aspire to establish.
      - Identify the influencers and decision makers
      - What are the key Connection Channels - How do you best connect with the participants in this niche? Conferences, social media, events, blogs, email?
      - Influencers - Who does the decision makers of your desired partnerships respect?
      - What lower level partnership could you knock out of the part to use as a case study and testimonial to influence your next target.

      The biggest mistake most startups make in establishing strategic partnerships is swinging for the fences and betting their future on the big deal. Partnerships take time, and the bigger ones take even more time. Balance the risk by creating a steady stream of smaller partnerships while slowly chipping away at the bigger ones. This is a chess game. Use a mind map to create your playing field.

      You can speed the process with Influencer marketing. Co-creating content with the influencers in your niche. The content needs to compelling to the creators, because otherwise, why on earth would they be inspired to do their best work? This is something that many fail to grasp. Creators need motivation to do great work, you need to find out what that is and make sure it’s taken into account when choosing a topic. Next, the content itself needs to be of high value to the target audience. Remember: You + brand + influencer co-creator + audience = success. You need to consider everyones “why.” Why would they participate? What do they have to gain? Why should they care?

      If you want to read more, I interviewed Lee Odden of Top Rank Marketing on the subject http://craftofmarketing.com/lee-odden/

      2 Share
  • JF

    Javier Feldman

    4 months ago #

    Hi Seth! Thanks for being here today! Here's my question for you:

    What was the trigger for your writing this book? Why do you think that what you cover in the book is important at this point in time?

    Cheers!

    • SP

      Seth Price

      4 months ago #

      Javier, The Road to Recognition is the personal branding guide I wish I had a decade ago. But it’s more than that. It’s a modern day toolkit, one that I’ve used to navigate the digital world, build my career, and build four multi-million dollar businesses from scratch. Personal branding has been instrumental to my survival.

      But this book isn’t about my story. It’s about achieving success in the age we live in.
      There is no singular path anymore, no great idea that doesn’t require promoting, no guaranteed career, no diploma that will ensure success.

      The concepts here are not new. In fact, many can be found in blog posts littered all over the web. You may have even utilized some of these ideas during your journey to where you are today.

      What is new is the focus on creating a roadmap to follow, a coach whispering in your ear, the things you need to do to set yourself up for success as you choose your own adventure.

      This isn’t personal branding theory for marketing geeks. This is an actual roadmap for everybody else: the makers and doers of the world.

      When it comes to building your brand, it's a jungle out there. Between blogging, social media, networking, websites, content marketing, landing pages, email and PR, there's so much to manage in today's always-on, always-connected universe.

      Whether you’re an entrepreneur, young student, consultant, artist, yoga teacher, designer, chef, photographer or retiree, you are a brand with a reputation to be recognized and there is no reason to leave that up to others to control.

      This book was created to help you cut through the noise and guide you to your personal success with organized tips and tactics, clearly outlined in every chapter.

      Thanks for asking, If you want to learn more, here's an infographic we just finished. http://theroadtorecognition.com/graphic

  • DH

    Dani Hart

    4 months ago #

    Hi Seth,

    Great to have you here. Thanks for joining!

    Considering you've been with the company since it was 3 people big, how has the culture shifted as the company has grown? How much attention is given to the culture now vs. when the company was first launching?

    Also, any lessons learned you'd like to share from launching a book?

    Can't wait to hear what you have to say!

    Cheers,
    Dani

    • SP

      Seth Price

      4 months ago #

      Dani, Thank you. Culture has always been a priority, yet when you are in the early stages, you don't get to spend much time planning it, it just comes as a result of your actions. That works only until you are about 50 folks. After that, you may not get to interview and spend time with every new hire. You have to start thinking about process, activities, attributes of employee behavior that contribute to a great culture and those you want to avoid, no matter how talented the potential hire. We've gone through our share or rocky points where we weren't communicating as much as we could have.

      We're in a really great place now, we have a fantastic people ops VP, Tammi Pirri. She's been instrumental in creating the infrastructure and setting the stage for people to grow. Also, our co-founders are very hands on and are good people. That is really the foundation of culture. Caring.

      The book launch is just beginning. We focused on making the book easy to read and beautiful to look at, simplifying complicated concepts to remove the fluff and jargon that often gets in the way of an idea being truly actionable and useful. And collaboration is built right into the book.

      The infographic will be published on a bunch of friendly blogs starting tomorrow
      http://theroadtorecognition.com/graphic

      Our guest blogging and podcast guest machine start in earnest in the next few weeks.

      The press page is up, and we've created a bunch of assets for our collaborators
      http://theroadtorecognition.com/media

      We've also starting to create a bunch of content around the launch to get the word out. http://craftofmarketing.com/personal-branding-quotes/

      It's a work in progress, much like a product launch

  • ES

    Edward Stephens

    4 months ago #

    Hi Seth,

    Amazing to have you on and thank you so much for joining. It's fascinating to hear your take on personal brand and non technical growth.

    A couple of questions from me:

    1) How should one find authentic growth as a personal brand and how can you reposition yourself (for instance if you have Instagram recognition but want to mature). What has been the most successful way you've developed your own personal brand?

    2) What tools should people use when developing and measuring their effectiveness as a personal brand?

    I look forward to hearing from you shortly.

    Best wishes,

    Ed

    • SP

      Seth Price

      4 months ago #

      Edward, today we live in an environment where online reputation can be your strongest asset or your biggest liability.. Where marketing and sales are better executed by employees with strong personal brands than by the brands themselves.

      Sales reps who use social media as part of their sales techniques consistently outsell their peers.

      On average, employees have 10x more followers than their company's social media accounts.

      Sales reps who use social media as part of their sales techniques outsell 78 percent of their peers.

      Ninety-two percent of people trust recommendations from individuals (even if they don’t know them) over brands.

      Tesla has Elon; Basecamp has Jason, Amazon has Jeff, Zappos has Tony and, Barbara Corcoran is still the most recognizable part of The Corcoran Group even though she hasn't been there in years. Look in your industry and think about the most influential people there. They have strong personal brands. That brand reputation comes from the work they do and the activities they perform to share their ideas (content as in publish or perish in any medium that matters to you and your audience).

      An effective personal brand wields influence. Once you understand how to develop one, it can lead to

      A steady stream of ideal clients
      Rewarding partnerships
      Leadership opportunities
      Greater mindshare
      Association with a niche
      Greater credibility
      Higher perceived value
      Recognition and prestige

      For me, creating content and public speaking have been the most successful activities I've used. But that's only if force me to give you a simple answer. That doesn't take into account the 1000's of hours I've gone out of my way to build relationship by helping others without any clear ROI. I like the book, Go-Giver, it's a mentality I live by, inspired by my grandparents. Who always gave more than they took.

      As far as tools for measuring. That's very personal. Are you achieving your goals at the quality level and velocity that you desire? Only you know that.

      I can tell you that I have never been hired because of my resume or pedigree. I've been hired because of my reputation, cross-referenced though the people I've worked with and the content I've created. Is there a gauge to measure that if I'm satisfied with the results? Sorry I don't have a magic bullet for this one.

  • GH

    Glen Harper

    4 months ago #

    Hi Seth, thanks so much for being on the AMA. Does Placester have a formal growth team? If yes, when was the need for it felt and how is it structured organizationally? If not, why, not? Thanks in advance, Glen

    • SP

      Seth Price

      4 months ago #

      Glen, we don't have a formal growth team but we are founded by growth-minded individuals. Frederick Townes, co-founder of Placester was part of Mashable's founding team and their CTO, he also built W3-Cache, the #2 downloaded WordPress plugin. Matt Barba, was an engineer with a finance background. Numbers driven and analytical. And when I joined, I came on as sales driven marketer, incentivised by the success of the company above all else, not on individual sales. So I wasn't personally concerned about cannibalizing commission and how I would be paid on our growth. That is often a big challenge when thinking about growth. Inadvertently incentivizing the wrong things and creating growth aversion.

      We've leveraged that collective mentality to build a culture of iteration, testing and tinkering to add velocity. A growth team alone does not make a successful business. You need a growth minded organization, cross functionally.

  • AW

    Abraham Walker

    4 months ago #

    What are 3 examples of real estate agents killing it through blogging?

    Killing it = making money :dollar:

    Why do you think they are successful?

    • SP

      Seth Price

      4 months ago #

      Abraham,

      I am referring to content marketing which is markedly different from blogging. Content marketing is the act of creating relevant and useful content for a defined audience to drive a measurable business outcome.

      Content can take many forms: written, whitepaper, photo video, slideshow, infographic, games, web app, white paper, podcast and live video, etc...

      The average American spend 70% of their waking hours consuming digital media, not to mention the billions (182 Billion at last count) of emails that hit our inboxes every day, it’s enough to make your head spin.

      If you or any business is not creating valuable content to inform, connect and motivate your audience today, it will have an increasingly difficult time getting the consumer's attention tomorrow. Content may be one of the few remaining vehicles left that allow you to build a relationship at scale. Read my post on the subject http://craftofmarketing.com/joe-pulizzi/

      Here are a few real estate content marketing examples:

      Ben Bacal, www.benbecal.com - 400 million in sales last year, video rockstar, leverages the medium to promote each one of his sales to get the next one.

      Shay Hata, www.shayhata.com - from zero to 30 Million in sales in less than three years. Has written a post to answer every question her customers ask. The Parrot Technique, If a client asks you a question more than once, you create a post for it and use it in your follow-up communication in all the channels that matter to your audience.

      Judy Weiniger, a two agent team, 20 Million in sales in 2015. Leverages video to generate 45,000 views on YouTube and establishing herself as a pillar of her community.

      The reason they are successful is that they are asking the right questions

      Who are your ideal customers?

      What’s important to them?

      What do they like, don’t like?

      How old are they?

      Where do they congregate?

      These are just a few of the questions that can help you identify who exactly is in your target audience, where to build your tribe, and more importantly how to communicate with them so that you make a connection.

      The answers to these questions will not only help with your content strategy and any content you create, they will also help you with understanding what products to build, how to better target your ad spend and how to enable your sales team with the tools to sell to the modern consumer, social selling style.

      The only thing you need to remember is that personas are not etched in stone, they evolve just like all relationships evolve. Not only do you learn more about your individual personas (customer examples), they’re growing non-stop and for you to be in tune with them you’ll want to pay attention.

      Then you have to set goals.

      If you’re not sure what business outcome you’d like to achieve with your content efforts, start by building an audience and subscribers. You know, folks that give you permission to communicate with them regularly. But remember this is a privilege that won't last forever. It's easier than ever to unsubscribe or ignore emails.

      This is a blue ocean for real estate professionals at the moment, but the ocean with quickly turn to red-waters if you don't jump on the opportunity to be consistent, innovative and dedicated to serving your customers online. The alternative is to continue interrupting with cold-calls and banner ads. That ship is listing. Hope this helps.

      • SP

        Seth Price

        4 months ago #

        Forgot to add on of my favorite content creators:
        Melanie Piche, The Brel Team in Canada. 60Million in sales last year. They have one of the most comprehensive blogs that I've seen in the real estate space. Focusing on both domestic and international clients.

  • AA

    Anuj Adhiya

    4 months ago #

    So stoked to have you on Seth!

    I'm curious to learn more about your experience as a non-engineer helping bring a product to market. Beyond what you summarized about what you did, could you talk more about learnings as to what worked and what didn't and whether any of that applied to how the product was marketed moving forward?

    Also, what lessons do you think non-technical founders can take away about how to market their own products/services?

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