Leave a comment
Get the GH Bookmarklet

AMAs

Pedro runs Growth at Typeform, a tool that helps you build beautiful online forms. Pedro joined Typeform in late 2013 and has helped the company grow from a free beta to a product admired and used across the web.

Today, Pedro leads a team spanning people from engineering, product and marketing focused on getting Typeform to as many people as possible and converting them to happy typeformers.

He ranks Andrew Chen and Brian Balfour as his top growth influencers, and Tomasz Tunguz for everything else startup-related.

Before Typeform, Pedro worked at Danone, a yogurt company, where he helped the marketing team launch a couponing platform to drive consumer loyalty. He also has a car advertising startup in Lisbon which connects drivers with brands.

In his spare time, Pedro likes to play soccer and tennis. He also used to play guitar in a punk rock band.

You can connect with him to talk Growth on LinkedIn or Twitter: https://linkedin.com/in/pedromagrico

@pedro_magrico

Ask Pedro about: hiring and scaling growth teams, product virality, channels, pricing, onboarding, data & analytics, and anything else you want!

He will be live on June 16 starting at 9:30 AM PT for one and a half hours during which he will answer as many questions as possible.

  • SE

    Sean Ellis

    almost 4 years ago #

    Hi Pedro, thanks for doing this AMA with us. I noticed that you participated in Andrew Chen and Brian Balfour's SVBR growth series last year. I have two questions related to it.
    1) What was the most valuable thing you learned there?
    2) How would you describe Typeform's growth model?

    • PM

      Pedro Magriço

      almost 4 years ago #

      Hi Sean, big thanks for having me. I’d absolutely recommend taking it for anyone doing growth.

      1)

      The most valuable thing I learned in SVBR (now http://www.reforge.co/) was that all sustainable growth models are based on product loops.

      Understanding how each new cohort of users ultimately generates another cohort of new users -- and modelling, quantifying, optimizing and shortening that loop -- should be the cornerstone of any growth strategy.

      It really helped me put things in perspective in everything we do at Typeform.

      2)

      We’re a viral product. People and businesses use Typeform to create and share typeforms (www.typeform.com/examples), which carry our ‘Powered by’ branding, which in turn generates more users:

      New user
      -> Creates typeform
      -> Shares typeform
      -> Respondents click (or see) our branding
      -> Respondents sign up
      -> New users

      This is the core of our growth engine. It’s awesome because it gets us a ton of free traffic and customer acquisition :)

  • TS

    Terence Strong

    almost 4 years ago #

    Hi Pedro:

    Thanks for doing this!

    The online form space is very competitive, how do you defend against competition?

    -Terence

    • PM

      Pedro Magriço

      almost 4 years ago #

      Hi Terence,

      It’s great to be here :)

      We invest a lot in the product. Filling in a typeform is a very different experience than going through a regular form or survey, especially on mobile. This has been hugely important. We live in an age where UX is the new competitive advantage and where switching costs are low.

      Then, forms are inherently viral, and we’ve worked hard in optimizing that virality and getting new users to that amazing product experience as quickly as possible (which in turn further fuels virality).

      So if people are coming to you to build stuff they’re going to share with others and the experience is GREAT, good things will happen :)

      I mean, check this out: https://twitter.com/typeform/timelines/574944095094841344

      So yeah, having a great product and great distribution have really worked on our favor.

      5 Share
      • AA

        Anuj Adhiya

        almost 4 years ago #

        That is a great wall of love!
        Quick q - how did you create that custom timeline?
        Was it throught Tweetdeck or some other way?

  • MM

    martín medina

    almost 4 years ago #

    Pedro,

    Thanks for doing this AMA it's great to see people working on growth all over the world, especially in Barcelona (one of my favorite cities).

    You transitioned from working at a large company (Danone) working on marketing consumer food products to working at a much smaller startup. Were you able to transfer anything over from your previous work and what do you think startups emphasize that larger, more traditional companies overlook?

    Also, along those lines you've been at Typeform since the beta stages to where we are today. How have growth and product challenges changed over the years and how have you scaled your team accordingly?

    Lastly, are there certain things you look look for when adding to your growth team and has that changed as the company has grown or do some things remain universal?

    Thanks again!

    Oh and one more for fun! What's your favorite soccer team? You live/work in Barcelona but your name and background suggest you're from Portugal.

    • PM

      Pedro Magriço

      almost 4 years ago #

      Heyi Martín,

      Barcelona is amazing, I’m really happy to be living and working here!

      Work at Danone wasn’t very hands-on. Big corporations like to outsource. My job was mostly liaising and coordinating with digital marketing agencies and doing a lot of powerpoints for management.

      Working at a startup is completely different. There’s a lot less bureaucracy. You’re free (and encouraged) to take risks. It’s very hands-on. You need to learn everything by yourself, especially when you join such at an early stage like I did. It’s challenging, but it can be very rewarding :)

      • PM

        Pedro Magriço

        almost 4 years ago #

        Scaling is hard. A few things come to mind: working with legacy code, staying focused (there’s always lots of great ideas and a million things to do), hiring well and fast (this is a big one), onboarding new people, team communications, keeping emails and meetings to a minimum. You need processes as you grow, and to be honest that’s something we still figuring out. But at the same time you don’t want to establish too many rules and rigidity.

        So in Growth we own new business MRR. So our job is to get the product out there, and get people to use (and pay for) Typeform. And that’s how we’ve structured our team: one part works on brand awareness and acquisition channels (content, PR, paid, social, etc) and the other part actually works on the product to improve conversions (through onboarding, pricing, etc.) to get new users to value as quickly as possible. We’re big fans of A/B testing.

        When hiring, we look for people that are passionate, smart and humble. In Growth, we also look for creative people who think big and are results-driven. That has remained unchanged.

        Yep, I’m from Lisbon! My favorite team is Sporting Clube de Portugal

        4 Share
      • AA

        Anuj Adhiya

        almost 4 years ago #

        I've had a similar career trajectory (ie bureaucracy to startup) and there is simply no question that getting in the weeds and actually doing things that have impact is way more fun than I've ever had - to the point where a lot of work doesn't feel like work

      • HQ

        Hila Qu

        almost 4 years ago #

        Growth team owns MRR, which makes sense. On the other hand, how do you collaborate with and separate duty with product & sales team (if any), which all contribute to the MRR?

  • TO

    Taslim OKUNOLA

    almost 4 years ago #

    Hi Pedro,

    Thank you for coming around.

    I just wanted to ask how you ensure that your hires keep improving themselves over the course of the jobs. Do you make use of third-party learning websites like Lynda or do you have a robust internal knowledge base?

    In either case, what is the process like? Do you draw a learning path for them to follow or just leave them to explore as they please?

    • PM

      Pedro Magriço

      almost 4 years ago #

      Hey Taslima, thanks for the question!

      Improving the knowledge of our team is hugely important, learning is what keeps us all motivated. Honestly, I don’t have any formal process set up. We have a really proactive team and they often set up shared learning sessions between them. For example, when someone reads a book that they think would be interesting to the rest of the team, they put together a short presentation to present the main takeaways.

      Something else we do is get together once a week to watch a webinar about a different topic. We then have a discussion about it afterwards. I guess what I’m saying is, we leverage our internal knowledge a lot—we have a lot of talented people here!

      4 Share
  • AA

    Aldin A

    almost 4 years ago #

    Hi Pedro,

    Thanks for being here!

    1) What resources do you use to learn and stay upto date with growth (books, podcasts, blogs)?

    2)What does your marketing stack consist of, and can you aslo explain your rationale for each of your choices?

    3)Can you talk about some of the challenges of scaling the business and how you've overcome them?

    4) What is your process for figuring out what channels you should focus on for customer acquisition? How do you evaluate them? How do you come up with a plan of action to attack that marketing channel?

    5)Can you talk about your process for hiring and scaling a growth team? For you, what does a growth team consist of? How do you go about empowering them and make it so that they aren't afraid to experiment and fail (on their way to success)!

    Thanks

    • PM

      Pedro Magriço

      almost 4 years ago #

      Hi Aldin,

      That’s a lot of questions! I’ll go through them one by one:

      1) I read a lot online. Growthhackers is a great starting point :) Then, Andrew Chen (http://andrewchen.co/) has published a few posts you can learn a ton from. Brian Balfour (ex-HubSpot) is also doing a new series of posts on growth which is really, really good: http://www.coelevate.com/growth-machine

      2) We use Segment to reduce vendor lock-in, speed up tracking implementation and make sure we have the same data in all the tools we use. The two most important for us are Amplitude (great with funnels & behavioral cohort analysis) and Intercom (for event-based messaging).

      3) See my answer to Martín’s question above

      4) We don’t have an established process. It’s a mix between gut feeling, existing expertise in the team, channel saturation, reach and cost. We’re investing big time now on content, because even though it’s saturated and costly, we’ve put together a great content team (check out our new blog! www.typeform.com/blog). It’s also perhaps the only channel you really have to establish your brand as a thought leader in your space.

      It depends on the channel, but I’d say you need to try and see what works, learn, iterate and try again. If you see you’re not making it work or you’re getting diminishing returns, move on to another channel.

      5) I don’t have an established process here either. It all happened naturally. We started to recruit developers internally as soon as we realized the product was really our growth engine. Now, as we’re trying more channels, we’ve hired people in each area, starting with paid acquisition and content: paid because you can measure really fast if it’s working or not and iterate (it’s a numbers game), and content because it’s key for the brand. In the midst of this, we’ve also ended up recruiting and scaling a data and analytics team that now moved out of growth to serve the entire company.

      As for empowering the team, you need to get everyone aligned towards the same objective, explain the goal / problem very well and make sure everyone takes part in coming up with projects and experiments to meet your objective. Also, celebrating wins is very, very important, as well as giving visibility to our work. We’ve recently implemented a process for everyone in the company to place bets on A/B test variants (using an internal virtual currency which you can trade for amazon vouchers). It was one of the best things we did to motivate the team. It gives a lot of visibility to our work internally, and it gets everyone in the company excited about our experiments.

  • HQ

    Hila Qu

    almost 4 years ago #

    Hi Pedro,

    In your Linkedin profile, I read that you "increased Typeform's viral coefficient by 5x and also launched Typeform's Referral Program" Very impressive! Is the viral loop designed as part of product? How is the referral program designed? Very curious to learn more from you because viral is critical to drive success but not every company can achieve that.

    My 2nd question is about the channels Typeform used to market the product. How does that evolve over time, at different stages of the company? Do you decide about which channel to explore and how do you know which to spend more effort/money on?

    Finally, how does your team run the growth process day to day?

    • PM

      Pedro Magriço

      almost 4 years ago #

      Hi Hila,

      Our viral coefficient is the # of users each cohort of new users brings through our powered-by loop (See my answer to Sean’s question above).

      Referral programs are usually incentive programs you set up to reward existing customers that refer you. We have a great product, so we figured people would be even more likely to spread the word if we gave them a gentle push. So some time ago we found saasquatch (http://www.referralsaasquatch.com/), a cool referral program tool that integrates with Stripe and does all the heavy lifting for us. We haven't measured our viral coefficient there since it's not the core of our growth engine, but it does generate a nice amount of new paying customers. When we launched it, it accounted for 10% of all of our new customers. It’s nowhere near PayPal’s referral program back in the day or Dropbox’s, but we’re not a mass-market product (I mean, everyone likes money and needs storage, right?) and it’s still a nice little boost :)

      2) Check out my answer to Aldin’s question. Hope it helps!

  • LS

    Logan Stoneman

    almost 4 years ago #

    Hey Pedro - really appreciate you coming on today!

    I have a question for you related to hiring with growth teams:

    Where do you prioritize roles to hire? Do you hire more team members who are well versed in a marketing channel you already know works, i.e. to double down on success. OR do you hire new team members who can bring in talent in marketing channels you have yet to leverage?

    Thanks man!

    • PM

      Pedro Magriço

      almost 4 years ago #

      Hey Logan, great question.

      I would say a bit of both. I hire people with a strong entrepreneurial drive. These are people who are naturally drawn to learning about new channels, increasing their own knowledge and then proposing ideas. They like to push things, and are very results-driven. They’re usually brought in as an expert for a particular channel, but they often end up contributing in some other way too.

      2 Share
  • PD

    Pranav Divakar

    almost 4 years ago #

    Pedro, I'm sure you have days when your growth experiments/hacks have failed or you failed to reach the growth targets, What do you do then ? What is that 1 marketing technique which you would fall back on ?

    • PM

      Pedro Magriço

      almost 4 years ago #

      Hi Pranav,

      Post-mortems and retrospectives are REALLY important. They are key to helping you learn and keep on improving.

      You shouldn’t need to change your focus if the fundamentals are there i.e. you have an objective, a plausible hypothesis, good data to back it up and your idea is easy & fast to validate. The faster you go through the idea -> execute -> measure -> learn -> idea loop, the better. Just make sure to document your cycles :)

      On a side note, you’ll need to be pragmatic if you want to move fast. From my experience, it’s usually not that straightforward to call that an experiment or a project is a fail, especially when you’ve worked so hard on it.

      I'm thinking for example when you’re doing an A/B test and you're seeing an inconclusive (happens all the time). You keep on giving your new onboarding flow or pricing page a ridiculous amount of time trying to get to statistical significance when it's not going anywhere anytime soon and you’re really just fighting for a marginal win. ("just one more day, just ONE more day..." And then you end up waiting another, and then another...)

      • PD

        Pranav Divakar

        almost 4 years ago #

        @Magunna This is a brilliant know-how into the way you think! Definitely helps! Thanks a ton for doing this AMA!

  • SK

    suneelkaw Kaw

    almost 4 years ago #

    Thank you for taking time out of your busy schedule for this AMA.

    I have a question about growth experiments. We are a small company in Advertisement Video On Demand space. We run multiple experiments that should have a strong benefit for our users and should increase engagement. However, when these experiments run, the metrics don’t move much. Can you please share thoughts from your work where an extremely strong hypothesis performed miserably in experiment?

    • PM

      Pedro Magriço

      almost 4 years ago #

      Running A/B tests can be extremely motivating or extremely demotivating. Probably the most frustrating result is an inconclusive one, as at least with a clear loser you’ve learned something. But that’s part of the game -- it’s very important to set expectations right with everyone. A/B testing can be very exciting, but can also create a lot of pressure.

      We recently did an experiment where we added an onboarding tutorial for new users using a typeform. We were pretty confident it would move the needle. Our hypothesis was that most users lacked context (after all, most of them are coming from filling in a typeform and so are highly unqualified) and that by using an actual typeform they’d be inspired. The result? Inconclusive.

      If you want to really move the needle, you need to test bigger changes: radical product changes that require a lot of investment and a completely new design approach to a friction point. More risk => more gain.

      But you need a balance. If 100% of your time is spent making small changes to one part of a page in a multi-step funnel, your ability to make a big impact is diminished. Likewise, if you spend all your time doing radical big tests, your ability to iterate and learn is diminished.

      Hope it helps!

      4 Share
  • SA

    Shaker A

    almost 4 years ago #

    Hey Pedro!

    Great to have you here!

    1)To become a data driven marketer is it enough to know the basics for statistics and sql?Would it be helpful to learn something like the R language or is it a unnecessary when you have a limited amount of time? If someone wants to learn how to 'understand and analyze' data, what would you recommend they learn?

    2)There are a million things you could be working on growth at any one time. Can you talk about your process for figuring out
    the MOST important thing you have work on RIGHT for growth? How do you make and prioritize your growth road map?

    3)Do you have singular hub where you gather all of your data (from all the different maketing tools) to analyze it, or are they segregated in each of the different marketing tools you use and you just analyze it within said tools?

    4)How do you go about thinking about and increasing retention?How do you go about thinking about and increasing engagement?

    5)I know Brian Balfour and Andrew Chen are your top growth influencers (I like them a lot too). Who else do you like for growth that writes amazing content?

    Thanks

    • PM

      Pedro Magriço

      almost 4 years ago #

      Hey Shaker, it's great to be here!

      1)

      I wouldn’t say you need to even learn SQL or any other programming language to be data-driven. Being able to understand statistics definitely helps, but it’s more important to have a data-driven mindset than skillset. I think there are more important things for marketers to spend time on than writing scripts. Nowadays there are many plug-and-play tools you can turn to to get 80% of the data with far less effort.

      I believe the best thing to do is to simply start testing and analyzing data using tools like Optimizely. It saves you time, money, and is more than enough to understand the basics of statistical significance, etc.

      On another note: understanding the data is important, but equally important is the ability to draw conclusions for what the data means so that over time you develop a stronger gut and a better eye for future hypotheses.

      2)

      Couldn’t agree more. Sometimes it’s really hard to stay focused.

      Your starting point needs to be your growth model. You need to try to find your growth loop i.e. a system through which you get new users to ultimately generate new users. Ours is virality. Another example is user-generated content (e.g. Quora, Wikipedia), where people find you on Google, sign up, write / generate more content, which gets picked up by Google, which in turn gets you more traffic and new users. It can also be paid acquisition i.e. buy ads -> people sign up -> % buys -> more money -> more ads (e-commerce websites excel at this).

      Try to model your loop and quantify each step of it. Then start prioritizing the steps that have bigger reach (optimizing sign up flow & onboarding is a classic), high estimated impact (this involves a lot of gut feeling) and low cost. You can build a simple model in a spreadsheet that weights each factor and score all of your ideas.

      From time to time, it’s also great to take a step back and ask yourself “if everything else in the business were to stay the same, what is the one thing that would have the most impact on our growth?”. Get together with your team once a quarter to answer this question. It helps you stay focused, and also helps you think of big, bold changes that are more likely to give you that 10x win you read about online.

      Finally, learn to say ‘no’. This is easier said than done (especially when it’s the higher-ups asking), but it’s really important if you want to keep your team focused and motivated.

      • PM

        Pedro Magriço

        almost 4 years ago #

        3)

        We use Segment, it has helped us centralize all of our tracking. But we still have our databases separated from that data, and a lot of times the tracking isn’t well implemented -- good product instrumentation is REALLY important, I wish I had learned about it when we started (tracking issues will cost you a fortune in the long-run).

        4)

        We focus on optimizing onboarding. It all starts there. Then, once you get new users to value, notifications are the best tool you have to drive them back to your product, especially when you can make them relevant, contextual and get the timing right. They work very well in amplifying existing behaviors and push users to repeat micro successes they have with your product (e.g. you just collected a new response, check it out). Think how you get a notification from your messaging app once someone sends you a new message (we love the little red icons on apps). You’re very likely to answer it, which in turn makes the other person more likely to reply back -- this fuels an engagement loop that really moves the needle in pushing your retention line higher.

        However, you can’t use notifications to drive repeated behavior of something they never did before. If you try them to drive new behavior, it’ll feel like spam. We do try to be more relevant through behavioral-based messaging (especially for inactive users that have showed some successful behavior in the past), but it’s very hard to make them work well.

        Final note: hacks like heavily pushing users to go yearly through discounting or not sending the invoice when the subscription renews are just artificial ways to increase retention. They should never be your primary focus.

        5)

        For content marketing and SEO, Brian Dean from http://backlinko.com/. Then Rand Fishkin from MOZ -- our marketing growth team rarely misses one of his Whiteboard Fridays: https://moz.com/blog/category/whiteboard-friday

  • ES

    Edward Stephens

    almost 4 years ago #

    Awesome to have you on i'm a massive fan of Typeform I pretty much mention it to everyone at all times......(minor exaggeration).

    A couple of questions:

    1) What made you want to attack onboarding forms as a company? I think it's genius but it's something that had seen so little innovation most people seemed to have just accepted the defacto standards. How much are you learning from the way users best engage with forms - any takeaway secrets?

    2) What are your thoughts (with companies like MeetQuinn and Angel.AI) on AI like/based onboarding and is this something that sits in the future pipeline for Typeform?

    3) What are the most profitable growth channels for typeform at the moment and why do you see some people sticking with traditional solutions over adopting your products (it seems strange there should be any resistance)?

    • PM

      Pedro Magriço

      almost 4 years ago #

      Edward, thanks for the kind words and thanks for spreading the word!

      1. There’s a great article by our co-founder David in Smashing Magazine talking about how they came across the idea, it’s a great read if you’re into UX: https://www.smashingmagazine.com/2014/09/sci-fi-frustrations-flash-and-forms-the-typeform-story/. Re. forms usage, to be honest we haven’t digged the data much, but it’s something we’ll start to do very soon, so stay tuned to our new blog :)

      2. Conversational interfaces is naturally something we’re interested in. Our product is all about being conversational, and it’s great to see how technology is becoming more and more ‘human’. We’ve brainstormed about using AI for a lot of things (both for creating and taking typeforms), but there’s nothing concrete in the pipeline just yet.

      3. Word of mouth via direct & branded traffic from search, as well as powered-by-Typeform traffic, are huge for us. As to why people stick with traditional tools, most of the times is because we don’t have a particular feature people need. Getting them to use Typeform is a challenge because often times we don’t even have the particular feature they need on the roadmap (having a clean product is a wonderful thing!). For these people, rather than shipping that feature, it’s often a matter of educating them on how design and UX is really a much more important thing to have good completion rates and quality answers / data, and that you can use other tools together with Typeform to do that other job you need (e.g. data analytics / reporting).

  • GD

    Guerric de Ternay

    almost 4 years ago #

    Hello Pedro,

    1. Typeform is based on a subscription model, which is justified is use the product regularly.

    How do you solve the growth challenge of people who have very punctual needs of forms?

    2. You recently launched a beautiful blog. How does it fit with your current acquisition strategy?

    Thanks for doing this AMA. ;)

    • PM

      Pedro Magriço

      almost 4 years ago #

      Hey Guerric,

      1) Great question, you’ve hit on one of our biggest challenges. A lot of people use us as a survey solution, which is a one-off need you have periodically. The thing is, you can create any kind of form or one-to-many interactions with Typeform: quizzes, job application forms, feedback forms, contact forms, payment forms, etc. And that’s the challenge -- to educate people on what else can be done. We've launched our template gallery exactly because of this, and we're always experimenting with other ways to educate and inspire them. It's a big challenge!

      2) Thanks for your kind words about the blog, we’re very proud of it :) We’re a design and UX-led company, so having a good-looking blog was a big thing for us. But more than that, we want it to be useful and inspiring. It’s not just about SEO and rankings. It’s about building our brand and establishing ourselves as a thought leader in each category you can use Typeform for.

  • JI

    Joaquin Ibanez

    almost 4 years ago #

    Several colleagues have asked about the ways you are able to stay updated about Growth Strategies, now I want to ask you about the method Typeform or your teams uses to archive all the knowledge and data all these experiments generate.

    Thanks in advance and Congratulations for your excellent work

    • PM

      Pedro Magriço

      almost 4 years ago #

      Hi Joaquin, Google sheets is your friend. The collaboration features just work.

      We try to keep all of our spreasheets organized in one big folder so we can have everything in one place :)

  • AL

    Arsene Lavaux

    almost 4 years ago #

    Hi Pedro,

    Great to see a fellow soccer player doing an AMA. Thanks for doing it!

    Which part of your soccer experience, if any, relates most to your growth marketing team leadership?

    • PM

      Pedro Magriço

      almost 4 years ago #

      Hey Arsene! Interesting question ;)

      In soccer the best teams are the ones that play really well together, and so is a good growth team -- well, any team actually. So instead of trying to find one growth hacker rockstar, I try getting the team to work together really well as a whole. Team spirit is really important. It’s what keeps them together after 10 inconclusive A/B tests, a really nasty bug that somehow ends up in production or a channel that seems to never really take off.

      Something else you can apply from soccer is learning to save your energy, pick your battles and make sure you remember what’s important. It doesn’t make sense to run all over the pitch in the first half if it renders you useless in the second half, right? :)

  • TT

    Tamas Torok

    almost 4 years ago #

    Hey Pedro,

    It's awesome having you here! I love using Typefrom, my favorite feature (among many) is page takover :D.

    My question: What have you tried in the early stages to get new users? (What were the best 3 and worst 3 experiments?)

    Thanks,
    Tamas

  • AA

    Anuj Adhiya

    almost 4 years ago #

    Hi Pedro - great to have you on!

    From the outside it felt like there was a tipping point of sorts and then suddenly everyone was using Typeform.
    Was there some intentional strategy there or just a culmination of events?
    If it was the former, could you elaborate on what went into it?

    • PM

      Pedro Magriço

      almost 4 years ago #

      Hey Anuj,

      Early on we realized that our big growth driver was the product itself. We saw some early traction from people who raved about what we had done up until that point, and that was really amazing to see. We thought if we could make it even better and make our branding more visible, more people would be going to talk.

      With that in mind, we focused everything on the product and very little on actual marketing. We’ve A/B tested extensively with our Powered-by branding and secured some big wins that brought some very nice inflection points. But overall I’d still say it was mostly the result of good, natural organic growth.

  • NK

    Namarita Kathait

    almost 4 years ago #

    Hi Pedro, I'm currently writing an article on Viral Loops and knew from the start Typeform would be the best example to put in. Could you give me an insight on whether Typeform's referral programs were part of the virality it achieved? What was the impact of your referral program in the sustainable growth?

  • AA

    Anuj Adhiya

    almost 4 years ago #

    One more..

    From a general use perspective, its not like there's anything particularly wrong with other form solutions.
    What do you believe Typeform provides that is so much more valuable that's lead to such great adoption of the product?

    • PM

      Pedro Magriço

      almost 4 years ago #

      Other form providers are functional, they serve their purpose. They just lack personality, a fun element.

      Typeform only asks you one question at a time using beautiful design and a big font. This helps you focus. And it feels more conversational.

      I think that’s what makes Typeform unique :)

  • PG

    Piyush Gupta

    almost 4 years ago #

    Hey Pedro, I hope you're doing good!

    What according to you is/are essential component(s) for a product to make viral in terms of buzz around it?

  • DR

    dimple ranpara

    almost 4 years ago #

    Hey Pedro,

    Appreciate you doing this. I have two questions:

    1. While creating a Viral product, how should the Growth Team avoid dilution of the product?
    2. Growth is perceived in terms of numbers. How can quality be maintained ?

    - Dimple (CollegeBol, India)

SHARE
60
60