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Tom is an award-winning growth marketer and DJ

He primarily works with the Forward Partners portfolio companies advising them on growth strategy and deployment, everything from PPC all the way to TV. 

Prior to this Tom gained experience heading up the marketing function at high growth daily deals site Wowcher, online gaming firm William Hill Online and the on-demand services app Bizzby.

He oversaw a period of hyper-growth at Wowcher with the acquisition of over 4.5m new subscribers in 18 months via a myriad of sources, whilst engaging them through 300m emails per month, ultimately leading to a PE buyout.

Recently he founded the online liquor discovery members club, Spirit Catcher.

Tom graduated from the University of Edinburgh with a degree in Chemistry.

You can follow him on Twitter: @TomMacTom

He will be live on June 30 starting 930 AM PT for one and a half hours during which he will answer as many questions as possible.

  • GA

    Greg Aubert

    almost 3 years ago #

    Hi,

    How do you deal with small sample sizes when testing out multiple channels to find at least one that can work?

    Being data-driven is great, but I'm guessing you face constraints as you strive for an answer ASAP and at the lowest cost.

    So do you compromise by:
    - spending a lot to get the requisite traffic faster
    - letting tests run for more time
    - allow lower significance levels for judging success
    - something else?!

    Would be great to hear the specifics of how you dealt with small sample sizes with one of your companies (or a hypothetical one if it's confidential)

    Cheers!

    • TM

      Thomas MacThomas

      almost 3 years ago #

      Hey Greg, how's tricks?

      First up just wanted to say thanks for GrowthHackers for having me, this is a such a great site and I'm honoured to be answering some q's. :raised_hands:

      • TM

        Thomas MacThomas

        almost 3 years ago #

        Really good question.

        So startups rarely have the cash to be able to drive enough traffic to do whatever they want to reach a statistically significant result.

        I preach that time is your worst enemy in this situation, not making incorrect decisions (we all do that). Decisions = best guesses anyway.

        So I’d say use the data you have to make an informed decision quickly - which will mean you rarely, if ever, get to a significance value that statisticians would be comfortable with. If you can allow non-critical tests to run for longer then fine (but I’d also ask why the hell are you spending time testing this).

        2 Share
      • AA

        Anuj Adhiya

        almost 3 years ago #

        Psyched to have you on! Lets do this!

      • AA

        Anuj Adhiya

        almost 3 years ago #

        @tommactom Even with low sample sizes/time constraints - do you lean towards a minimum # of data points or conversions before making a call?

    • TM

      Thomas MacThomas

      almost 3 years ago #

      @anujadhiya I'm not sure there is any hard and fast rule for this. It's really down to your own level of confidence. This can be swayed by other things than just the numerical results, the robustness of the test etc could influence this.

      With 1000 sessions I get a little more comfortable, but it's usually nowhere near significance.

  • NC

    Nge Chee Keen

    almost 3 years ago #

    Hi Tom, thanks for the AMA.

    I'm keen to know what are the first few things you look at while advising the Forward Partners portfolio companies growth?

    If you can explain the thought process behind it, or the kind of data that you'd look at or the questions you'd ask that'll be great, thanks!

    • TM

      Thomas MacThomas

      almost 3 years ago #

      Hey mate, thanks for tuning in!

      At Forward Partners we invest at what we call Idea Stage and also at the more well-known Seed Stage.

      When we invest at idea-stage we’re literally starting from nothing, so the first thing to get is traffic so you can find and assess the conversion rate of the site. Quite often this might be through SEM as it’s quick and fairly qualified (although recently we launched a site with door dropped flyers).

      Once you’ve got some data on how it converts you can work out your expected CPA for that channel.

      Then you’ve got to take a look at whether that CPA is anywhere near acceptable given the gross margin of the business. If not, then focus on conversion rate optimisation, if it’s ok then ramp up the marketing and begin to optimise.

      3 Share
      • TM

        Thomas MacThomas

        almost 3 years ago #

        Unit economics are usually the first thing to break an ecommerce startup so we spend a lot of time focussing on this. We need to see a path to improvement and (ultimately) profitability. We also need to see quick progress - usually 2-6 months in. It's kinda hectic.

  • GA

    Greg Aubert

    almost 3 years ago #

    Another one :p

    How do you deal with channels that take a lot of time to see results - e.g. content and SEO.

    They might be the best channels for a company, but how do you know unless you commit to a solid amount of work and playing the long game?

    Or do you just spend your time in channels with fast feedback loops, like FB ads and Adwords?

    • TM

      Thomas MacThomas

      almost 3 years ago #

      We meet again... :)

      Initially we don’t bother, we have to move way faster than any SEO play might allow us to. Not to say it’s not valuable, it obviously is, but we are trying to do 30% MoM revenue and IMO content & SEO cannot deliver that at the start. When the business has more budget it would make sense for them to dedicate an amount of time to SEO, but it depends on the business.

      2 Share
      • TM

        Thomas MacThomas

        almost 3 years ago #

        At Wowcher we never bothered with SEO. We ran TV campaigns, had 70% brand awareness (unprompted) in the UK (after a year) and had a high traffic volume - all of which, in our view, negated the need to spend cash on SEO. So it really depends on your circumstances.

  • AA

    Aldin A

    almost 3 years ago #

    Hi Thomas,

    Great to have you here! I noticed you previously worked on e commerce. Couple of questions for you in regards to e commerce.

    1) How do you retain your users, if users only use the app occasionally by it's very nature (ex fashion shopping site/app )? If the frequency of usage is infrequent it's harder to get them to build a habit of coming back to the site. What types of things would you do to make sure the site/app are top of mind when they do want to (for example a new jacket)?

    2)What are some of your favorite analytic apps in the eCommerce space, and why?

    3)What are some of the problems that you've seen when scaling an e commerce (outside of scaling inventory and logistics) and how have you solved them?

    4)How do you go about differentiating your ecommerce site/app if there are a myriad of competitors that serve the same space( ex. the fashion space)?

    Thanks

    • TM

      Thomas MacThomas

      almost 3 years ago #

      Hey Aldin,

      Good question, it’s the bane of many marketers lives. This is a great read: http://andrewchen.co/new-data-shows-why-losing-80-of-your-mobile-users-is-normal-and-that-the-best-apps-do-much-better/

    • TM

      Thomas MacThomas

      almost 3 years ago #

      1) One method, employed by many, is to just email the hell out of your customers. Lots of retail, esp fast fashion ones in the UK, do this. It keeps you front of mind. Not sure i’d recommend though (and I come from a company that was effectively sending >300m emails a month). Maybe an app isn’t the best product for such an infrequent purchase?

      For stuff like new jackets - maybe utilise weather data to make more timely communications (via any method) with your customers. I know Driftrock do this very effectively.

      2 Share
    • TM

      Thomas MacThomas

      almost 3 years ago #

      4) This is a fairly broad q. I think you can finde differentiation with anything, you just need to create it and market around it. I.e. Apple effectively sell the same hardware as a number of other electronics companies, but they turned it more into a lifestyle choice.

      Focus on a product type maybe? Stylect have done this to shoes with a novel approach.

    • TM

      Thomas MacThomas

      almost 3 years ago #

      2) I use and like GA. I also <3 Excel. I especially love the GA plugin to Google Sheets. I come from a web analytics background (omniture/unica/piwik) so GA is kinda in my blood. Not a massive fan of mixpanel tbh. The data it presents can sometimes be very misleading.

    • TM

      Thomas MacThomas

      almost 3 years ago #

      3) The biggest challenge with ecommerce is always unit economics. You typically need a tonne of free traffic returning to the site/app to make the unit economics of the business work. A terrible situation to be in is when you're paying for first time customers and then paying again and again to bring them back to site to transact more, you're just aggregating your CAC. (Less important with high value items).

      I keep coming back to it, but CAC & LTV being out of sync will sink companies time and time again. Long gone are the days of cost effective adwords campaign paying back on first order (caveat: maybe not in the luxury / high margin market).

      2 Share
  • SA

    Shaker A

    almost 3 years ago #

    Hi Thomas,

    Thanks for doing the AMA!

    1)What skills does a marketer need to learn to 'understand' and 'analyze' data? Ex learn stats, sql, R languange, etc.

    2)There are a million things you could be working on growth at any one time. Can you talk about your process for
    figuring out the MOST important thing you have work on RIGHT for growth? How do you MAKE and PRIORITIZE your growth road map?

    3)What is your process for figuring out what channels you should focus on for customer acquisition? How do you evaluate them? How do you come up with a plan of action to attack that marketing channel?

    4)How do you think about scaling traffic growth? What changes for how you use a channel from when you first identify it's viability,
    to using the traffic channel at scale? What question do you ask yourself to make sure that the channels stays viable as you scale it up?
    What are the pitfalls to avoid as you scale a channel and how have you overcome said pitfalls?

    Thanks

    • TM

      Thomas MacThomas

      almost 3 years ago #

      Hey Shaker!

      I guess you just have to be numerate. That’s more important than the languages you can write. I know SQL, I definitely don’t know R (way too niche). Thinking about learning python for fun, plus you can develop applications with it.

      (Obviously only learn SQL if you deal with relational DBs - it's useless if you go to a place that's got MongoDB deployed.)

      • TM

        Thomas MacThomas

        almost 3 years ago #

        Good question.

        Marginal CPA is the metric you should keep in sight.

        Once you scale you’ll hit a marginal CPA inflection point with every channel you use. This is when you’ve hit the channel’s top end, over-saturating it. Bring spend down below this point. More here: https://thepathforward.io/channel-testing/

      • TM

        Thomas MacThomas

        almost 3 years ago #

        Also, max out on Excel. With Excel you can solve basically anything ;)

      • TM

        Thomas MacThomas

        almost 3 years ago #

        Correct! Or more ;)

        Couple of things with this...

        Find areas of audience density (off or online) - you’ll get the best results when you do.

        Don’t be afraid to say something didn’t work. I reckon 2 in 3 won’t. Moving quickly onto the next is key.

        I use a customised version of the Bullseye Framework coupled with scorecards to identify channel testing priority

      • TM

        Thomas MacThomas

        almost 3 years ago #

        (3) I thiiiink I answered this in (2) - shout if not :)

  • LS

    Lauren Steenholdt

    almost 3 years ago #

    Hi Thomas,

    We met recently when I accosted you at the end of Mat Braddy's growth hack talk :-)

    My question would be in regards to 'soft launches' - do you recommend apps create soft launches, as a a way to gain user feedback and slowly grow a small user base before fully launching on the App Store? i.e. use TestFlight. (We are a food/grocery marketplace app, and do not wish to launch without testing a small area of London first with buyers and sellers.)

    If you do recommend this, what would be your tips for getting the most out of it i.e. timeframes, previous successes examples? And if not, why- are there downsides we should know about?

    Many thanks!

    Lauren

    • TM

      Thomas MacThomas

      almost 3 years ago #

      Hey Lauren!

      Sorry you met me in such a state, I was no doubt stressed and sweaty :/

      Hope you enjoyed the talk though :)

      I guess my question back to you is what is the harm in launching on the app store (quietly) to get some data on a live app? I’ve not come across people using test flight for soft launches (rather than testing).

      Transferring testflight users to the live app will have a % that drop-off

      • LS

        Lauren Steenholdt

        almost 3 years ago #

        Stressed and sweaty? Haha no, not at all! You we're very patient while I babbled on... :-)

        Ah...I see what you're saying about the drop-off. So could you launch on the app store quietly, and then do a proper launch later?

        I guess we're afraid, if the app isn't up to par, people will download it then simply delete it! No?

      • TM

        Thomas MacThomas

        almost 3 years ago #

        Yes launch quietly on the app store. Sounds like you're going to do a very controlled soft launch anyway? (You'd have to using testflight).

      • LS

        Lauren Steenholdt

        almost 3 years ago #

        Thanks for all your help Thomas.

        It's really a case of us not doing enough user testing while we built. Questions and a few test users just weren't enough. Expensive mistake to make. Will definitely be reading all your pearls of wisdom on this page and putting them to good use!

  • RB

    Ry B

    almost 3 years ago #

    Hi Thomas,

    Thanks for taking the time to be here!!

    1) How do you go about thinking about identifying your retention levers and increasing retention?

    2)As an e-commerce platform the core business is very transactional. How do you make the whole experience about
    more than just buying something?

    3)How do you determine industry bench marks for things like retention in ecommerce?

    4)What are some things that ecommerce startups should be doing to increase their chances of survival? What are somethings
    they're screwing up on that could prove very costly?

    Thanks

  • ES

    Edward Stephens

    almost 3 years ago #

    Hi Thomas,

    Great to have you on i've actually worked with Forward Partners before and can vouch for what a great outfit you are.

    A couple of questions from me:

    1) Which marketing channels currently interest you? Also what are the overlaps you see in B2C vs B2B marketing e.g. Instagram, Snapchat.

    2) How do you plan and build out a new marketing framework for each of the new companies Forward take on and how do you exploit cross company marketing opportunities amongst your portfolio?

    3) What do you see the next wave of start-ups in the UK being, especially in post referendum conditions?

    Can't wait to hear your answers and it would be great to connect in London at some point.

    • TM

      Thomas MacThomas

      almost 3 years ago #

      Hola Edward, thanks for coming to the AMA :)

      1) I'm determined to make beacons work for startups. Small mission of mine. Also DMPs should be more accessible - working on that too. B2B is B2C - we're all people. If you can target Mr. CEO on FB perfect :)

      2) We have a process called The Path Forward. It's a bit long to talk through here though. All online :) We're not great at x-promoting within portfolio, it's a fairly diverse bunch of businesses.

      3) Chatbots!

    • TM

      Thomas MacThomas

      almost 3 years ago #

      Thanks for the Forward Partners love too, it's really appreciated :)

      Drop me a linkedin msg when you're in LDN

  • AA

    Anuj Adhiya

    almost 3 years ago #

    Hey Tom - so great to have you on!

    How does one land the gig of Marketer-in-Residence at an investment outfit like FP?
    What's the biggest benefit of such a role and should (some kinds of) marketers be actively thinking about getting a role like this under their belt? Why or why not?

    • TM

      Thomas MacThomas

      almost 3 years ago #

      Hey Anuj, thank you for having me :)

      I get asked this quite a lot... and it's a fairly random story. Ultimately FP found me at the right time and they were the right place for me. I was put in touch through a friend (Becs - thank you!). I guess having had experience of being an early employee at a very fast growing startup made me attractive to FP. There aren't thaaaat many people in the UK who've been lucky enough to be in the right startup at the right time to get on that ride.

    • TM

      Thomas MacThomas

      almost 3 years ago #

      The benefits of the role are wide-ranging... I get to work with some really exciting founders with great ideas. Every business I work on, it's about 4 a year, has its own unique challenges, so you get to problem solve all the time (which I like).

      This isn't a role for the inexperienced, I'm literally calling on every bit of random knowledge I've accrued to do this well whilst at the same time having to think creatively about new ways to drive cheap fast growth. There also aren't many roles like this I don't think - although some of the incubator guys would disagree. Best way to get into it, start mentoring in some accelerators etc.

  • TS

    Terence Strong

    almost 3 years ago #

    Hi Tom:

    Thanks for doing this!

    What are good benchmarks for successful e-commerce companies in the following areas:

    Facebook CPC
    Email Optin Rate
    % of email list that makes a purchase
    Retention rate
    Referral rate
    Shopping cart abandonment rate

    -Terence

    • TM

      Thomas MacThomas

      almost 3 years ago #

      Hey Terence, thanks for the question :)

      Soooo, I’m not a big fan of benchmarks.

      They’re meaningless as all businesses are different. For example, a benchmark for shopping cart abandonment for a high end fashion company vs a low end one are going to be completely different.

      I think there is a bigger point here though.....

      The only metrics that (reeeeally) matter are CAC (customer acquisition cost) and LTV (lifetime value). Benchmarks become irrelevant once you know what these values are (and if you don’t know them you can model them). Once you have a handle on these you can figure out what your other metrics *need to be* to make your unit economics and, hence, the business work.

      If interested I wrote a guide to LTV, it’s here: https://thepathforward.io/authors/TomMacTom/

      2 Share
  • LS

    Logan Stoneman

    almost 3 years ago #

    Hey Tom! I'm really impressed with all that you've been able to do in your career. I'm also impressed with your ability to juggle multiple roles and hobbies. Do you think that your side work with being a DJ or starting Spirit Catcher has helped your work in the growth sector? How so?

    • TM

      Thomas MacThomas

      almost 3 years ago #

      I set Spirit Catcher up basically as a personal challenge to answer the question “Can I set up a cashflow-positive business which requires minimum time to run (maybe 8hrs / month)?”.

      Not sure I’m there yet, but the ball is rolling… :)

    • TM

      Thomas MacThomas

      almost 3 years ago #

      Hey Logan, thanks!

      To be honest I think marketing is a job where you have to keep multiple plates spinning at the same time - sometimes to an overwhelmingly exhausting degree!

      I’m someone who likes to keep active - a friend once told me he didn’t really view the difference between work and holiday, just activity and inactivity, I’m not sure I’m quite at that level (I do like some downtime) but I buy it to an extent.

      • AA

        Anuj Adhiya

        almost 3 years ago #

        "just activity and inactivity" - wow that's certainly a unique point of view :)

    • TM

      Thomas MacThomas

      almost 3 years ago #

      With DJing, I chose to DJ on 4-decks, which means you have to have in mind what 4 different tracks are doing simultaneously. You’ve also got to be able to differentiate the different sounds once in the mix too. In a way, i guess (loosely), it’s akin to spinning multiple plates!

  • GD

    Guerric de Ternay

    almost 3 years ago #

    Hi Thomas,

    It's very exciting to have you here.

    You help people go through the discovery phase, i.e. transform their ideas into businesses. How do you explain to entrepreneurs that they shouldn't scale but experiment with the idea first? And how do you help them to get the minimum traction that they need to experiment "scientifically" (channels, process...)?

    Cheers! :D

    • TM

      Thomas MacThomas

      almost 3 years ago #

      Hi Guerric, thanks for your questions :)

      Yep we do. It’s a really exciting time for us and the founders. My personal favourite part of the job is getting some initial traction. It means we’ve made a good investment decision and it’s just great to see a vision realised (there also tends to be a lot of smiling, fist pumps, chest bumps etc :p).

    • TM

      Thomas MacThomas

      almost 3 years ago #

      This is a good question - basically every founder we work with wants to get to building product and making sales immediately. We stop this happening as what we think happens is that you build a product nobody really wants. Our main initial focus is customer interviews. We ask really open ended questions, not about the product, but the area and then glean super useful globules of information about the things people really do care about. When you’ve got lots of those you’ll be in a much better place to build something that resonates. Talking to people really is key, we get much better results with higher volumes of customer interviews.

      Once you’ve built something, then you can also use the information you have to inform your choice of initial marketing channel(s). If you’ve got good personas then this should be reasonably straightforward - the key for me is finding high areas of potential customer density.

      3 Share
  • DY

    Dribble Yousif

    almost 3 years ago #

    Hi Tom,

    Would love to know what you're thoughts on the next "blue ocean" marketing platform / channel is?

    Thanks,

    Yousif

    • TM

      Thomas MacThomas

      almost 3 years ago #

      Hey Yousif,

      Good question and nice ref to “Blue Ocean”.

      The very nature of “Blue Ocean” means it’s next to impossible for me to say - however I think there are some opportunities that have yet to be exploited properly…

      • Tinder etc
      • Adbots within messaging platforms
      • Genuinely think there is a growing opportunity with some of the new beacon protocols too (eddystone etc)

      It all comes back to audience density… where your audience is hanging out / what are they using. Find a target and find a way to...er… take advantage of any opportunity/vulnerability.

  • BS

    Bobby Stemper

    almost 3 years ago #

    Hey Thomas, thanks for being here!

    Effective resource management is a constant tug-of-war for early stage companies. How do you justify advising early stage (pre-launch and early launch) companies to invest in things like content marketing (time-expensive) and PPC (expensive-expensive).

    Are there any startups in particular who have done this well?

    • TM

      Thomas MacThomas

      almost 3 years ago #

      Hi Bobby, a pleasure!

      It completely depends on the company, their situation and their short term goals. If they’ve got a budget and adwords works within their targets then fine. If not, then potentially they should go down the time route. Interns help with this of course ;)

      Out of our portfolio, I think www.Lexoo.co.uk have juggled paid with non-paid marketing pretty well.

  • AP

    Adam Paciorek

    almost 3 years ago #

    Hi Tom, thanks for doing this AMA and sharing your knowledge and experience!

    Couple of questions from me:

    1. What are the most controversial or unorthodox growth hacks you have seen working well for startups?

    2. Has anyone trained you in digital marketing? Who would you say is your biggest influence?

    3. What are the biggest mistakes and myths you see in digital marketing? What are the biggest wastes of time?

    4. What are your favourite books or resources on growth marketing and startups? If people had to teach themselves (quickly), what
    would you suggest they use?

    5. “If you were to launch a startup and aim to get first 1000 paying subscribers, what would your plan be? What if you had 8 weeks to achieve that?

    6. I noticed that Spiritcatcher has very little social media presence (I could only find a small FB page). Could you share a bit how you plan to drive traffic that converts to that site?

    Thanks!

    Adam

    • TM

      Thomas MacThomas

      almost 3 years ago #

      Hey Adam, how are you doing?

      1) Hmm, one company I heard of realised that a large proportion of their target market followed a certain youtube celebrity. So, they asked them to join their company as a non-exec director and gave them equity. The youtuber then pumped out the brand to their following. #neat

    • TM

      Thomas MacThomas

      almost 3 years ago #

      2) Nope. Avinash Kaushik - analytics. That’s where I started. Music: Luciano - he’s a tech-house god.

    • TM

      Thomas MacThomas

      almost 3 years ago #

      3) Gah, there are many! The silver bullet one is probably the most frustrating one to deal with. There aren’t any silver bullets. Period.

      They can all probably be summarised by the fact that your product-market fit (or lack of it) if in a constant state of flux. Hence, marketing never sleeps.

      Also - there isn’t any point doing social media if you don’t have an audience, build one first.

      Also - you need to work out what you’re trying to achieve. I see a lot of people just doing “stuff” without purpose.

      2 Share
    • TM

      Thomas MacThomas

      almost 3 years ago #

      I’m going to plug The Path Forward here: www.thepathforward.io - lots of super relevant startup content, which I write for.

      I read blogs for tips on certain channels, not sure you can teach yourself without doing, marketing is too dynamic and company specific.

    • TM

      Thomas MacThomas

      almost 3 years ago #

      5) Without any budget constraint this is quite a nebulous question… TV ads are fun! :p

      6) I leverage email and PR for Spirit Catcher at the moment. Email is the most ROI positive channel you will ever find - leverage it hard!

  • VG

    Vandana Guru

    almost 3 years ago #

    How do you manage to find time for both marketing and DJ-ing? I would really like to know how you straddle between the two worlds.

    • TM

      Thomas MacThomas

      almost 3 years ago #

      Hey Vandana :)

      With great difficulty! DJing typically has very anti-social hours attached to it and work is fairly full on at the moment. Day parties offer some respite!

  • MA

    MALIK AHMAD

    almost 3 years ago #

    Regarding idea stage ventures, what frameworks do you suggest are the best practices for early-stage startups to figure out who their early adopters are before engaging in social ads?

  • PD

    Pranav Divakar

    almost 3 years ago #

    Hi Thomas,

    Thanks for making time for the AMA!

    1. What are the first few marketing tips you give to a new portfolio company at Forward Partners ?

    2. What are the basic things that every startup must do to acquire users/customers?

    • TM

      Thomas MacThomas

      almost 3 years ago #

      Hey Pranav :)

      Running out of time here, so gonna be brief...

      1) Understand who your customer is by speaking to people about their problems

      2) Get their hands dirty. Traction doesn't come without blood, sweat and tears.

  • AA

    Anuj Adhiya

    almost 3 years ago #

    One more:
    So funnily enough, I graduated with a Chemistry degree as well.
    Do you find that having this background in the pure sciences influences your approach to growth/marketing? If yes, how (I have my own view on this but very interested in your take).

    • TM

      Thomas MacThomas

      almost 3 years ago #

      #weird

      Yes I think so. The marketing world when I started was still getting used to digital, so you had a lot of incumbent CMOs who were tbh crap at all the data stuff. It came naturally to me, because of my analytical background. I imagine if I was starting out now it would be a bit different. Being logical helps, a lot.

      With pure science you maybe miss out on some of the creative sides of it, however a brainstorm coupled with beers usually solves this :p

      Interested to know your take...

      • TM

        Thomas MacThomas

        almost 3 years ago #

        Haha for sure.

        Aim:
        Hypothesis:
        Method:
        Results:
        Conclusion:

        I still use this, err, framework... :p

      • AA

        Anuj Adhiya

        almost 3 years ago #

        Hah - yes beers or gin and tonics :)

        The biggest learning for me in how these two seemingly separate worlds intersect is in thinking about things holistically and as systems.

        Within systems, even minor changes can have big impact so just having it in the back of my mind that what I'm seeing/measuring may not just about what's immediately apparent but may have unexpected effects elsewhere/elsewhen always keeps me in a state of healthy paranoia :)

        The other very pleasant surprise was that running growth experiments is in concept no different from running experiments in a lab - the scientific method applies in both cases. My first growth experiment doc template was literally one repurposed from a high school lab!

  • PD

    Pranav Divakar

    almost 3 years ago #

    Thomas,

    On your LinkedIn Page it says you won an Award for Best Lead Generation Campaign -Performance Marketing Awards.

    Would love to know what you did & what worked ?:)

    • TM

      Thomas MacThomas

      almost 3 years ago #

      Sure thing...

      We have a lot of affiliate based email data in the UK, you could buy it on a cost-per-lead basis. I basically stitched together about 40 different suppliers of this data together (everyone else only used one for some unknown reason) to generate a monthly lead pool that was in the region of 100k - way bigger than others at the time. I think it was the scale of the operation that won it.

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