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Hi, I'm Emily Kramer and I lead the marketing team at Asana.

For the past three-and-a-half years, I've helped build and scale Asana's marketing team and I'm continually inspired by Asana's approach to building a business. We are driven by a clear mission to improve how teams work together, and Asana's freemium "land and expand" business model presents many fun challenges and opportunities for driving growth. We take a consumer approach to B2B marketing--we create web-based content with an emphasis on both brand design and performance, instead of creating white papers, PDF case studies, or gated content. Most importantly, we are building a brand and product customers love, with rapid growth in free users at the top of the funnel and in Premium users and revenue down funnel.

Prior to Asana, I led digital and product marketing at Ticketfly, which was acquired by Pandora last year. I began my career at ad agencies—I was a media planner for Microsoft and a founding team member of Cadreon, which is IPG/MediaBrands' programmatic ad platform. I went to undergrad at Tufts University and went back to Boston for an MBA at Harvard Business School (and more cold winters). I currently live in SF, where I'm basically a local after nearly a decade in the city.

You can find me on Twitter @emilykramer or linkedin.com/in/emilykramer. (I'm also on Snapchat, but admittedly have no idea how that thing works!)

I will be live on August 30 starting 930 AM PT for one and a half hours during which I will answer as many questions as possible.

  • HQ

    Hila Qu

    about 1 year ago #

    Hi Emily, really excited for your AMA.

    In your bio, you mentioned that you helped start and build the marketing team at Asana. Exciting times!

    I wonder can you share a little bit more details about that journey? How did you go about choosing which area to focus early on when the team is just you? How did you then go about adding additional channels and hiring a team? As the marketing team grow, what's the biggest changes for you and how did you solve it?

    Another question is that how do you think about retention for Asana, and what does your team do to better retain users?

    • EK

      Emily Kramer

      about 1 year ago #

      Well, to be totally fair, it was never “just me.” From the start, I collaborated with a marketing designer and an analyst/web dev/growth hacker, and our COO. But, in terms of choosing what to focus on, I don’t really think this gets any easier as the team grows. Prioritization is always the number one challenge--throughout my 3+ years at Asana there have always been a seemingly infinite number of things we could do. I wish there was a magic formula for figuring out what the best thing you can be doing with the resources you have, that will help you hit short-term goals, while setting the business up for long-term growth.

      • EK

        Emily Kramer

        about 1 year ago #

        Here are some of the ways I think about prioritizing....
        -Balance scaling what you know works, and running experiments to figure out what you can add to the core activities. Example: We made SEM work, and started testing other paid channels one by one. We made lots of mistakes, but figured out what would work long-term.
        -Agencies and contractors are great for certain things and are a little lower risk than hiring a dedicated person at the beginning while you are figuring out what works. PR and SEM are on top of that list IMO, and we had these agencies in place before I started at Asana. In fact, we still have agencies for these things.
        -This is tough to explain without a whiteboard, but we were laser focused on one part of the funnel early on--driving top of funnel growth/sign ups through our homepage. Over time, we’ve expanded our focus up funnel and down funnel. We now have a robust brand ad and awareness strategy. We also create content and run campaigns focused on adoption, upgrades, expansion, retention, and reactivation.
        -We figured out what we wanted to be great at early on and knew that couldn’t be everything. Someday we will be true experts at SEO, paid acquisition, onboarding, retention, email marketing, platform marketing, brand awareness, content distribution, etc. etc, but it’s going to take a while.
        -We set clear targets and goals, had a clear mission, had marketing principles (guiding philosophies and values) in mind, and learned from our mistakes.

      • EK

        Emily Kramer

        about 1 year ago #

        Here are some ways I think about hiring...
        -I’m lucky that Asana thinks a lot about hiring and culture and really values taking time to find the right people who are passionate about the product, mission, and company.
        -I always think about complementing the skills the team already has and hire for people, not job descriptions. My experience (especially 3 years ago) was mostly in ads and lead gen, so we hired for content roles first. But, when there are so many things to do, I don’t think the order of the roles you hire for matter as much as finding great people.
        -Especially early on, we hired “full-stack” marketers. People who were comfortable doing everything from strategy to analysis and optimization themselves.

        Here's what's changed....
        The biggest change for me personally is how I spend my days, I spend less time heads down at my desk and more time interacting with others. We can take on much bigger projects and have larger goals. But, some things are the same, I spend a lot of time on hiring, think a lot about prioritizing, remain focused on quality and efficiency, and use Asana for everything.

        I’m gonna skip the retention part of your question, but I think I will cover it in other answers.

        7 Share
      • HQ

        Hila Qu

        about 1 year ago #

        Emily, incredible answers, thank you for sharing especially the thoughts on prioritizing!

  • LS

    Logan Stoneman

    about 1 year ago #

    Hey Emily! Truly a treat to have you on here!

    I hate to be blunt with my question, but - my team stopped using Asana two years ago as it was not providing enough value to our projects. It does seem like major improvements have happened since, so how do you (as a marketing team) recapture potential users like myself? (Users that are aware of the product and brand, but not educated on it's recent improvements).

    Thanks!

    • EK

      Emily Kramer

      about 1 year ago #

      A lot has changed, the biggest being that we launched a redesigned product last year. We think a lot about reactivation and one of the major advantages of a freemium product is that we have a lot of email addresses, since our signup process is so simple. So, email is our primary channel for reactivation and we do email blasts/newsletters ~1x/month to our entire inactive user base. We do this when we have product updates or new content that we think will add value for this audience (we intentionally do not send email blasts on a set cadence since we don’t want to force email content). We also have a re-activated user email drip, to try to increase engagement and adoption rates when users return.

      While email is our primary channel for reactivation, people do unsubscribe :) We also reach these users with our retargeting ads and promoted content. This is less measurable, but we also focus on existing user engagement and retention, knowing this is a great word of mouth driver that can help bring inactive users back. Nothing works better than a friend or colleague saying, “You need to try Asana again, they launched Dashboards and it’s been a game changer.”

      Reigan, our email marketer, talks more about our email strategy here: https://medium.com/email-marketing-interviews/lessons-learned-from-asana-s-email-specialist-447af359deb3.

      5 Share
  • AA

    Aldin A

    about 1 year ago #

    Hi Emily,

    Thanks for being here!

    1)Regarding ticketfly, how did you initially source and get the supply side on to the network when ticketfly was a nascent platform and didn't yet have the demand necessary to naturally attract the supply side? How did you build credibility with them and get them to give you a shot?

    2)How did you go about acquiring the supply side at scale? What was the process for identifying
    the kinds of you want on the platform to finally getting them on the platform? How did you scale this
    process?

    3)What are some of the challenges of scaling the the ticketfly marketplace and how did you overcome them?

    • EK

      Emily Kramer

      about 1 year ago #

      To answer your questions more specifically, the Ticketfly founders were lucky enough to have been in the ticketing game before, so they were able to get big names right from the start, having these references from the start made adding more venues and promoters (supply side) much easier. But, I'd recommend this regardless, focus on getting a customer that is willing to work with you while you develop your product, make sure they are willing to be a reference, and treat them like gold.

    • EK

      Emily Kramer

      about 1 year ago #

      Ticketfly questions, taking me back!

      1.) Venues and promoters (event sellers) sign exclusive contracts with a ticketing company like Ticketfly. These are for 1 or multiple years, so event sellers get locked in. Under these contracts the event sellers can only sell ~10% of their tickets through another seller (like fan club/artist direct tickets). This means competitors need to wait it out until these contracts expire. There are also often signing bonuses given when an event seller signs a contract, so you also need to have $$$ as a ticketing company. This makes it pretty hard for competitors just starting out (when time and money is not something you usually have).

      2.) Ticketfly was primarily focused on b2b marketing, while we wanted to help venues and promoters sell more tickets, we weren’t doing this through stickiness for consumers, we were doing this through stickiness/value of our platform for the venues and promoters. We did try to build a better consumer experience because Ticketfly does make money on a per ticket basis. But due to the exclusive contracts, consumers unfortunately don’t really have a choice when it comes to buying tickets in the primary market (not through resellers like Stubhub).

      3) Short answer: Ticketmaster/LiveNation! We tried to overcome this by building a better product that helps venues and promoters sell more tickets--and by trying to make it really clear the value they will get by choosing Ticketfly.

      • EK

        Emily Kramer

        about 1 year ago #

        This answer was intended for the other Ticketfly question from Ry B, but it applies well here too.

  • RB

    Ry B

    about 1 year ago #

    Emily,

    Great to have you here.

    1)What stops someone from recruiting the event sellers on ticketfly and creating a competing service? Similar to what we've seen with Uber and Lyft vying for the same drivers? How do they 'lock-in' their sellers? What is it that makes ticketfly a defensible product? I understand that they have competitors, but what allows them to hold on to their position in the industry?

    2)How do you retain your users, if your user only need to use your app occasionally by nature (ex users use ticketfly only when they want to find a concert)? If your app isn't used frequently, building up the habit is hard, which makes it even harder to retain the user. How do you go about trying to stay top of mind so when the user has a need that your app solves they think of you? How did ticketfly accomplish this?

    3)From your time at Ticketfly what are the most important lessons you've learned about marketplaces/networks?

    Thanks

    • EK

      Emily Kramer

      about 1 year ago #

      1.) Venues and promoters (event sellers) sign exclusive contracts with a ticketing company like Ticketfly. These are for 1 or multiple years, so event sellers get locked in. Under these contracts the event sellers can only sell ~10% of their tickets through another seller (like fan club/artist direct tickets). This means competitors need to wait it out until these contracts expire. There are also often signing bonuses given when an event seller signs a contract, so you also need to have $$$ as a ticketing company. This makes it pretty hard for competitors just starting out (when time and money is not something you usually have).

      2.) Ticketfly was primarily focused on b2b marketing, while we wanted to help venues and promoters sell more tickets, we weren’t doing this through stickiness for consumers, we were doing this through stickiness/value of our platform for the venues and promoters. We did try to build a better consumer experience because Ticketfly does make money on a per ticket basis. But due to the exclusive contracts, consumers unfortunately don’t really have a choice when it comes to buying tickets in the primary market (not through resellers like Stubhub).

      3) Short answer: Ticketmaster/LiveNation! We tried to overcome this by building a better product that helps venues and promoters sell more tickets--and by trying to make it really clear the value they will get by choosing Ticketfly.

  • SA

    Shaker A

    about 1 year ago #

    Hey Emily,

    Thanks for doing this AMA at GH!

    1)There are a million things you could be working on growth at any one time. Can you talk about your process for
    figuring out the MOST important thing you have work on RIGHT NOW for growth? How do you make and prioritize your growth roadmap?

    2)After you've found a channel that works for you how do you think about scaling that particular acquisition channel? What changes for how you used a channel from when you first identified it's viability, to using the channel to generate leads at scale? What question do you ask yourself to make sure that the channels stays viable as you scale it up? What are the pitfalls to avoid as you scale a channel? How do you overcome said pitfalls?

    3) In your opinion what are things early stage startups have to do to not only survive, but thrive? Conversely what do you see startups messing up that they can't afford to, and how do they fix them?

    4)What are the most valuable lessons you've learned in your career?

    Thanks

    • EK

      Emily Kramer

      about 1 year ago #

      2.) Once we find a viable acquisition channel we shift from “test and learn” mode to “scale and grow” mode. First we figure out that a channel works, and then we try to optimize and scale the channel without getting diminishing returns. Tactically, this means we put more focus on systematically testing our way through a broad range of creative and copy and audience targeting options, and rigorously measuring the impact of those optimizations.
      We set more formal and rigorous cost per acquisition goals for proven channels, and we compare current performance to these goals on a regular basis to make sure the channel remains viable as we scale. We also look at user quality on a regular basis to make sure the audience remains valuable.
      The biggest pitfall to watch out for is knowing when your current channel strategy has begun to see diminishing returns and it’s time to refresh your approach. This can sometimes be as easy as new copy and creative but as you start to max out channel volume it can require significant account restructuring to solve.

      6 Share
    • EK

      Emily Kramer

      about 1 year ago #

      1) I touched on this in some other answers. But more tactically, you can actually try to estimate the impact of your tests using historical performance and projected reach (a small conversion win with a high volume audience, might have a higher impact than a major conversion win with a really small audience). But, we try not to make ourselves too crazy here and also rely on intuition.
      We try test things that are high volume first and then roll out changes we know work to smaller audiences. Meaning we test sweeping landing page changes on our homepage first, and then apply these to segmented landing pages).

    • EK

      Emily Kramer

      about 1 year ago #

      3) Speaking specifically about marketing here...Hire well. Having a nimble team of full-stack marketers means you can react to changes quickly and effectively. A mistake I see is just getting people to fill roles and not waiting to get the right people.

      Also- sometimes people start with high-impact media and expensive marketing tactics, instead of focusing on the nuts and bolts like SEM and SEO which are easily measurable.

    • EK

      Emily Kramer

      about 1 year ago #

      4) Get comfortable delegating. You can't do everything yourself (I'm still learning this lesson on the daily).

  • SE

    Sean Ellis

    about 1 year ago #

    Hi Emily, Thanks for doing an AMA with us! My question is what is the hardest part of marketing Asana and what have you done to overcome this challenge?

    • EK

      Emily Kramer

      about 1 year ago #

      There are 2 hardest parts :)

      1.) Individuals sign up for Asana, and then try to get their team onboard. This means that the signed up user plays a big role in getting their team to adopt, so we need to make sure they have the right materials to help expand their team and company's use of Asana. When selling top down, a tool becomes the official tool much faster (but often the selling process is much longer). This challenge isn't unique to Asana, there are obviously many companies trying to navigate freemium enterprise software business models, but there's still a lot to figure out! To overcome this, we've put a huge emphasis on user education and arming the internal champion with the right content...for this reason we have an extremely robust, custom "support" site: https://asana.com/guide

      2.) Trying to explain what Asana is/positioning. Asana isn't really a replacement product, it's not an CD to a cassette tape (throwback!). So getting positioning and messaging right has been a challenge.

      4 Share
  • VS

    Vineet Shukla

    about 1 year ago #

    Hey Emily,

    Thanks for your AMA.

    I was wondering what are the best way to select a channel which works for a business and what ROI or metrics should one consider. How does Asana track , compare and manage Metrics of their cross-channel Digital Marketing spend. ?

    Thanks,
    Vineet Shukla

    • EK

      Emily Kramer

      about 1 year ago #

      We use a pretty standard measure to look at the success of marketing efforts: LTV/CAC = get as close to 3 as possible.
      Meaning the value we get from a customer should be 3x the all-in cost of getting a customer.

      The marketing team has a sign up goal at the top of the funnel, but to ensure we don’t get low quality sign ups that will never become successful users, we also have a quality threshold (which is just the adoption rate or conversion rate to the next stage of the funnel). We do not hit our goal if we go below our adoption rate benchmark. Checks and balances!

      We have found that there is no one tool that consolidates all of our marketing analytics given our business model (this is frustrating--does someone have a solution???) We use a mix of tools, and our stack includes Google Analytics, Salesforce, Looker, and in-house dashboards.

      6 Share
  • KS

    kuldeep sharma

    about 1 year ago #

    Hello Emily,

    Hope you are doing great !

    How does Asana manage their content marketing and what are the biggest challenges you are facing with this channel currently?
    Also would you be willing to share one (or some) SEO growth hacks you are currently using?

    Thank in advance

    Kuldeep

    • EK

      Emily Kramer

      about 1 year ago #

      We manage content marketing using Asana, it’s great for editorial calendars! (sorry, can't help myself, always marketing) https://asana.com/guide/examples/marketing/editorial-calendar

      The biggest challenges we face with content marketing typically revolve around attribution and measurement. Specifically, figuring out how to value a visitor has been a challenge. It’s hard to figure out how to prioritize promoting our content vs. promoting the product itself (especially since we have such a simple sign up flow).

      I don’t know if it counts as a “hack” but our SEO initiatives are driven primarily by strategic content creation. We’re lucky to have a pretty efficient content “machine” internally, and we put out several new pieces of content per week. Maintaining that cadence while incorporating target keywords, and then distributing that content online has helped us see early, solid results in SEO.

    • EK

      Emily Kramer

      about 1 year ago #

      Something we did wrong for quite a while with SEO was having too many images on our website, and not enough words. We are very design-centric and relied on images to tell the story of our product and company, but we've had to go back and text these pages up. Meaning, we now think more about balancing words and images to explain our product.

  • AL

    Arsene Lavaux

    about 1 year ago #

    Bonjour Emily,

    Big fan of Asana from the onset. I used your early solution a few years ago.

    1) Could you tell us how product-market fit was achieved with Asana?

    2) You mention in your bio that you look to create non-conventional B2B web content at Asana. This is great. Could you give us more color on what you specifically do differently to combine "brand design and performance" as you mentioned it?

    3) Do you see potential in AI-powered content curation and distribution? If so, have you used any solutions? Which ones?

    Merci beaucoup!

    • EK

      Emily Kramer

      about 1 year ago #

      1) Asana was created after our co-founders had success building a tool inside of Facebook that gained traction internally and became essential to Facebook’s workflow. This was great early signal on product/market fit.

      2) We try to always add value for our readers, our users, and potential users. This comes first. This often means we don’t follow the standard B2B content rules just because they exist. All of our content projects start by defining the concrete goals and audience of that content piece, and then we make decisions based on what will best achieve those goals.

      As for brand design and performance, we don’t just rely on test results to determine what version we are going to use. We put the customer experience first and remember that we are building a brand. After lots of testing a page can look a bit “Frankensteined” so we always make sure we are still conveying the right brand message.

      3) There are definitely AI-powered content solutions on the market that we’ve looked into. Platforms like Zemanta, Outbrain, and Taboola have great potential but it’s not anything we’ve moved forward with just yet. We still have a lot of open questions about how AI influences brand (kind of like the early days of display advertising, when controlling placement and what you ran along side of was a huge challenge--that’s gotten a bit better). So for now, we still put a lot of emphasis on organic content distribution and influencer outreach to build high-value placements and partnerships online.

  • CS

    Charity Stebbins

    about 1 year ago #

    Hey Emily, happy asana user here! I really like asana's playful brand voice -- particularly the personality that emerged after the redesign. (I feel like I'm playing Space Team when I open my asana tasks). Could you talk a little bit about how you guys developed your brand tone and identity?

  • EK

    Emily Kramer

    about 1 year ago #

    Thanks for your questions! The live AMA has ended, but I will come back and respond to additional questions over the next few days. Enjoy your Tuesday.

  • SN

    Simon Nung

    about 1 year ago #

    Hi Emily,

    Thanks for taking your time in doing this.

    How are you? I hope your doing super well.

    I checked out your linkedin and saw that you went to Harvard Business School, thats very impressive.

    What did you learn whilst you was studing in Harvard Business School?

    Did you know you wanted to work in marketing?

    How long did it take you to be Head of Marketing at Asana?

    What advice do you have for someone who wants to start a career in digital marketing?

    Sorry for all the question, this just means I'm very interested.

    Thank you for doing this.

    • EK

      Emily Kramer

      about 1 year ago #

      Sorry for the short response, but I've run out of time for the AMA.

      If you are just getting your feet wet in digital marketing, I'd recommend getting started at an agency or larger company, where you'll get lots of mentorship. Do the unglamorous stuff to learn the ins and outs, get comfortable with numbers, and do things that are measurable where you will get clear signal on what works and doesn't work. I started my career trafficking ads, this experience is incredibly valuable still.

      The biggest thing I learned at HBS was how to feel confident sharing your ideas in front of a large group of really smart people.

  • LT

    Lisa Toner

    about 1 year ago #

    Hi Emily.

    I'm curious what your thoughts are around a content-centric funnel versus using the free version of your product as the primary offer at the top of the funnel. You mentioned you lean more towards the latter -- have you experimented with gated offers as a driver of growth at the top of the funnel for a freemium business model? What were your findings? What is the primary driver of your free user growth?

    Appreciate you taking the time to share your experiences,
    Lisa

    • EK

      Emily Kramer

      about 1 year ago #

      With other business models, using gated content for lead gen is essential. With our model, our leads are our users and we’ve made signing up so simple that we don’t need another offer. We make (almost) all content available to everyone, which enables broader distribution, more engagement, and more sharing. We have tried using blog subscriptions (a pop-up on our thought-leadership blog, but not a true “gate”) as another “offer”, but getting someone to sign up for our product was more efficient and a better customer experience.

      But I would say our model is extremely content-centric too, it’s just different content. We rely on our web experience, new user experience, user education content, and blog content to acquire and retain customers. Our product is also an essential part of the selling and marketing process (a huge bonus/advantage over other models).

      Our primary, attributable growth driver is organic search, which is a result of our content efforts and word of mouth from happy customers :)

  • MM

    martín medina

    about 1 year ago #

    Emily,

    Thanks for coming on here and doing this AMA!

    What do you think is your biggest advantage in taking a consumer style approach to B2B marketing?

    What are you most excited about for the future of marketing?

    • EK

      Emily Kramer

      about 1 year ago #

      Traditional B2B marketing typically doesn’t put the customer-experience first. I don’t think I’ve ever actually read a white paper (except for the one I had to write a few years back). Web experiences that you can optimize and content that is available to everyone is more easily shared and gets broader reach. It creates a better experience for people from the start, so they start to build brand affinity earlier. This ultimately creates a word of mouth engine...and I think just makes choosing a product to use at work and reading about how to be a better teammate or leader, more enjoyable.

      The freemium approach also means that a lot of users come through the door just to try the product, since signing up is free and simple. But there’s value in those users too—we continue to market to them via email with the goal of eventually re-acquiring them. This gives us a huge opportunity to target users who already have some level of intent.

      As for the future, I’m just wondering when we are going to get “driverless” marketing (driverless everything seems to be all the rage right now). In seriousness, I’m excited to get better attribution and an even better sense of what works and what doesn’t work (I like data).

  • SI

    Sarosha Imtiaz

    about 1 year ago #

    Hey Emily, looking forwards to your AMA!

    I really love your content and social media marketing style, very effective! On Facebook, I see your ads all the time targeted to my news feed and it has consequently led me to becoming a customer. (P.S. Our team at Aiva Labs love using Asana and find it super helpful!)

    We're currently working finalizing our content marketing strategy and are aligned with having contests resulting in more followers, emails and users. What other strategies do you suggest for a SaaS company to effectively market on Facebook to get the optimal customer reach? What targeting techniques does Asana use to pinpoint the perfect demographic?

    Also, with the market becoming increasingly crowded with other products that help companies track their work, what unique marketing strategies does Asana implement to stand out from the competition?

    Thanks!

    • EK

      Emily Kramer

      about 1 year ago #

      -They key to running an effective Facebook marketing program is setting the right goals up front. Instead of running campaigns that simultaneously aim to get followers, email addresses, and users, try focusing on one key objective for each campaign and let Facebook optimize for it.
      -High engagement is critical to getting optimal reach on Facebook, and the best way to achieve high engagement is to test out a variety of post types across all your audiences to see which ones resonate. We’ve seen high engagement across our audiences with content and video posts, but we’re constantly testing new ads to see if there’s something better out there.
      -Our Facebook targeting strategy relies heavily on our first-party knowledge of our audience and Facebook’s lookalike audience tools. We layer demographic and interest targeting on top of algorithmically-created lists of Facebook users who are similar to our followers to hone in on the users most likely to engage with our).

    • EK

      Emily Kramer

      about 1 year ago #

      As for unique marketing strategies, I think our genuine focus on our mission--to make teamwork more effortless--comes through in our marketing and our brand. We aren't just selling a product, but we are promoting and thinking deeply about a new way of working.

  • MK

    Marc Kennedy

    about 1 year ago #

    Hi Emily,
    Thanks for being here. I'm curious how your team has responded to the rapid takeover of marketshare that Slack has achieved in the space that Asana got to first.

    • EK

      Emily Kramer

      about 1 year ago #

      We think companies need 3 types of collaboration tools: File storage and sharing, messaging and communication, and work tracking. We fall into the work tracking category, while slack falls into the messaging and comms category. More on this in this blog post: https://blog.asana.com/2016/03/asana-raising-50m-for-work-tracking/

      We use Slack at Asana for synchronous chat, and we have a very popular integration. We see the tools as quite complementary.

  • WP

    Wiebe Poelmann

    about 1 year ago #

    Hey Emily,

    Awesome that you're doing this AMA.
    Can you explain to us what approach you use to activate your users?
    With tools such as Asana people and businesses have to adjust their daily routines to fully benefit it. Can you tell me how you go about this?

    Thanks!

    • EK

      Emily Kramer

      about 1 year ago #

      A critical ingredient to activation is getting the right people in the door from the start. We have a pretty shallow conversion event/simple sign up flow. So, we have to think about the next steps, activation and adoption in all of our user acquisition efforts (meaning we track these events and optimize against them).

      There are two main touchpoints that we use to activate our users once people have signed up:
      1.) The Asana app - the first 5 minutes that a user spends in our product is really important for user activation and making Asana stick. We try to help them understand how they can get value from Asana by giving them an interactive product tour, and pointing out key features. When it comes to in-product help, we try to help users when they’re stuck (and leave them alone when they’re not), so our tour points out key features if a user doesn’t naturally interact with them.
      2.) Email - this is all about getting users to come back to Asana after their first visit. We send an onboarding drip series that highlight how using Asana to manage their workflows can help them get more done. In those emails, we teach users about how their current workflows translate to working in Asana, to make that transition easier. We’ve tested this series and found that it increases visits, collaboration, and product adoption.

      3 Share
  • KL

    Kari Litzmann

    about 1 year ago #

    How did you determine budget when starting the marketing function at Asana? Any tips for navigating that conversation with the founders of a SaaS platform? And then how to allocate when you starting from scratch?

  • JM

    James Mello

    about 1 year ago #

    Hi Emily,

    How would you suggest a content marketer go about getting his/her content the most traffic that will convert into leads. More specifically the content is directed towards other marketers.

    What sort of (social) platforms do you find are most useful for this?

  • SS

    Sai Sundhar

    about 1 year ago #

    Hi Emily,

    1. What is the strategy you adopted to get your first set of 100 customers?
    2. How do you think SaaS companies should scale their success?
    3. How do you tackle the problem of content distribution in the noisy environment that we are witnessing currently?

    Thanks
    Sai

  • DM

    Danny Maloney

    about 1 year ago #

    Hi Emily- I'm curious to hear your thoughts on how I, as a founder, can best support our Growth and Marketing team. Any anecdotes or insights into what to do (or not do)?

    • EK

      Emily Kramer

      about 1 year ago #

      I would recommend combining your growth and marketing teams or making sure they are very closely aligned. Make sure that they are collectively focusing on the entire customer experience, so there isn't an obvious gap or change in the user experience when users are engaging with marketing content vs. the product.

      Marketing and Growth teams are key drivers of the business and have lots of insights into your customers and what they need...involve these teams in product roadmapping, forecasting, etc.

  • LB

    lauren bonsell

    about 1 year ago #

    Hi Emily!

    What was the marketing strategy behind the celebrations (when checking off a task)? I LOVE it - it's become a weird obsession within our office. Will we be seeing more new characters in the future?

    Thanks!
    Lauren

    • EK

      Emily Kramer

      about 1 year ago #

      This started as a hack from a hackathon, we just had a unicorn at that time. People really loved it and it became an obsession for lots of people. We saw people on social sharing screenshots, making their own unicorn t-shirts, etc.

      When you have something that people latch onto like this, it makes sense to lean into it. So, we added a few more Celebration creatures earlier this year. We want people to feel a sense of achievement when they complete work, so in a very quirky way this does that!

      I guess the strategy is don't be afraid to get a little weird with your brand!

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