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Irina Barskiy is the Head of Growth & Acquisition at Nutrimom - a startup under the global behemoth known in the US as Dannon. Nutrimom is a nutrition and coaching program for expecting and new moms that combines nutritional products, as well as an app where you can speak with maternal and nutrition experts, get tailored content and meal plans, and use various trackers. Irina is responsible for acquisition and retention, with all the fun a/b testing and optimization in between. 

A big portion of her 10+ year marketing career has been in startups. She's so passionate about helping brands (big and small) grow, that in addition to her full-time roles, she works with clients through her own consulting firm. She's also won two Telly Awards for a TV campaign she worked on while at FlatRate Moving. 

Follow her on twitter @soBarskiy, or visit her site www.IrinaBarskiy.com

She will be live on Feb 7 starting at 930 AM PT for one and a half hours during which she will answer as many questions as possible.

  • SE

    Sean Ellis

    over 2 years ago #

    Hi Irina, thank you for doing this AMA with us! I'm very curious about Danone's decision making process for introducing a "head of growth" role for Nutrimom. Can you share with us how it happened? Also, do you think it will ever happen that FMCG companies like Danone apply a growth hacking approach to their broader organizations?

    • IB

      Irina Barskiy

      over 2 years ago #

      Thank you for having me! It's a pleasure to be here. Funny you should ask! Our CEO still laughs about HR's reaction when she told them she wanted to hire a 'Growth Hacker.' As a startup under a global company that's been around forever, a lot of thought was put into how to operate outside of the corporate work environment. We knew we needed to be more agile and scrappy. We had to do a lot with a limited budget, and that was the motivation of the growth hacking approach. We even rented out desks in a coworking space with other startups and balanced our week between working from there and from Dannon HQ.

      Being a new brand in a new market, the traditional 'brand manager' role wouldn't work. What Nutrimom is doing is so so different than anything Danone has ever done before. First, we're selling direct-to-consumer. Yes, Nutrimom products are still available in brick & mortar retailers, but it's the first time we're selling products on our own eCommerce platform. Also, it's the first time we're doing a subscription model, and the first time ever monetizing services (coaching). We had to do things differently and everyone globally is watching us to learn from what we're doing. We're sharing our learnings with our other brands and countries so that they can adapt in their local markets. I do think that more traditional brands need to apply a growth hacking approach if they want to continue to be innovative and compete in our fast-changing environment where barrier of entry to start new businesses is significantly lower. Also, with engagement shifting more each year to digital and the continued growth of eCommerce, brands need to adapt to these changes and seize opportunities more quickly than they ever have.

      9 Share
      • SE

        Sean Ellis

        over 2 years ago #

        This is so awesome! Thank you for sharing the details. Hopefully your pioneering efforts will show the way for many other enterprises that realize they need to become more agile to stay relevant in the future.

  • SK

    S Kodial

    over 2 years ago #

    Hi Irina
    Can you talk about an experiment that was either a very big win or provided some great insight - at Nutrimom or elsewhere?
    Thanks!

    • IB

      Irina Barskiy

      over 2 years ago #

      I think the biggest win was eliminating barriers to sign up. I agonized over how many people we were losing at each step of the checkout funnel on the Nutrimom site. We tested different check out flows both with shortening the steps one had to go through, and with less information being required. We then decided to remove requiring payment altogether. We gave a free trial period up front, since we wanted to give people a taste of what we offered before asking them to commit financially. We could spend millions on advertising, but people don't know what they don't know. We were convinced that if she tried our coaching, she could see the value we could bring her and how beneficial personalized support can be during such a critical time. It was a scary thing to do - but it did wonders! It also forced us to get creative and work that much harder to retain her when it came time to upgrade to the paid plan.

  • AM

    Ana Maria Dârstaru

    over 2 years ago #

    Hi Irina,

    What has been the biggest struggle you've encountered when it comes to acquisition and retention? It doesn't have to be necessarily for Nutrimom.

    • IB

      Irina Barskiy

      over 2 years ago #

      Hi Ana! Good question! I think one of the biggest challenges for me is attribution and following the entire customer journey between the stages (discovery, research, sign up, etc... and the where(mobile site traffic, desktop, in app). So, I'll know how many people came from a facebook campaign or search....but then once they become a member/subscriber/customer, what do they do? Are the people who came from one source more engaged in an app versus people from another source? Or does certain ad creative get someone interested in a certain product or feature more than another? Because of anonymity in ad analytics, it makes it somewhat difficult to create in-depth customer profiles, which could otherwise make retention much easier if you can trace it back to initial customer experiences. If anyone has a solve for this, please educate me!

      5 Share
  • JR

    Jeremiah Rizzo

    over 2 years ago #

    Hi Irina! Thanks for sharing your knowledge :)

    1. Do you use AARRR metrics to track/improve growth? What specific metrics do you measure at each stage?

    2. What are practical steps someone aspiring to work as "Head of Growth" can take to achieve that goal? e.g. What kinds of experiences / proven results are companies looking for? Any advice for anyone who's preformed the role unofficially at a startup to get a foot in the door?

    Thanks!

    • IB

      Irina Barskiy

      over 2 years ago #

      Hi Jeremiah!

      1. Certainly! So acquisition metrics are dependent upon if the experience started on our website or directly in app. If in app - metrics I'm looking at are how many people downloaded the app and then how many people actually created an account. If they started their journey on site, then I'm looking at sessions, pages visited in the session (how far they're getting in the funnel), and how many complete checkout and sign up. On the activation side, I look at how many people engaged with a coach and if they used certain features on the app (read an article, watched a video, used a tracker, etc).

      For retention, I look at if they came back into the app, how often, and how long it took between initial sign up to 2nd return. The revenue is a critical piece. We give all subscribers a free 21 day trial, requiring no credit card to sign up. This was a decision we made after noticing a huge drop off in the funnel from starting checkout to getting to the point where credit card information was required. Obviously, by removing that friction, we get a ton more subscribers. However, it makes it more challenging to get them to upgrade to a paid membership at the end of the trial, but that's where our CRM/email plan comes into heavy play. I track open rates of each email in the series, but also in-app messages and messages sent directly by the coaches.

      We have not really focused on the referral part yet. We believe that if we provide true value for moms and moms-to-be, they will naturally want to refer to their other friends. I'd love to do a loyalty/referral program at some point when we have more bandwidth, as we know from research that moms are so powerful at word-of-mouth sharing when they love or dislike products.

    • IB

      Irina Barskiy

      over 2 years ago #

      2. Good question... I think companies are looking for someone who loves data and is able to draw insights from it and take action. Not just that - but someone who is curious by nature, and self motivated. I say curious because oftentimes companies are not aware of problems. You have to actively look for them, come up with possible solutions, and then create a plan to test those solutions. Being proactive on not only the 'what' but the 'so what' is what people want to see. I think startups are the best environment to get a foot in the door. Resources are always limited, and people who are self-motivated thrive because you get to wear multiple hats each day. That's why I love startups so much - no two days are ever the same. And because you have the freedom to do so much, it makes you well-rounded IMHO. So if you're already at a startup, great! Be curious, do a ton of a/b testing (no test is too small, and even an incremental life in conversions, revenue, or whatever KPI you are measuring, is validation for your points), be comfortable with looking at different kinds of data and being able to tell a story with it, and most importantly, never stop being the end consumer. Sometimes we are so close to the marketing/product side of things, we forget to see it from the customer's point-of-view. I hope that answered your question?

      3 Share
  • GH

    Glen Harper

    over 2 years ago #

    Hi Irina, thanks for being on this AMA. Expanding on an earlier question, could you expand on the challenges of being in a "startup" inside a large corporation? Did you find other departments operated in "silos" that required strategy to work with? Or did Danone set this up with a clean slate? Any stories you could share about how Nutrimom has evolved organizationally over time would be very appreciated. Cheers!

  • AA

    Anuj Adhiya

    over 2 years ago #

    Hi Irina - stoked to have you on!

    How do you think about retention when its a given that after a certain point in time new moms will not be new moms any longer and no longer have need of the app?
    How do you keep such users engaged (if at all)?

    • IB

      Irina Barskiy

      over 2 years ago #

      It's great to be on here, Anuj! Very good question and one the team pondered a lot as well.

      I think acquisition plays a key role to the success of retention. The customer we are going after is a woman in her 1,000 day journey, from the first day of pregnancy until her baby is 2 years old. Getting her in as early as possible in this journey is key because the earlier we can get her into the app, the longer we can provide value to her. This is especially critical in the first trimester, when women are not yet revealing their pregnancy and don't have trusted sources to turn to for all of their questions.

      But to get back to your question, once a mom is out of that 1,000 day window, she is still important to us. First, if we succeeded in making a difference in her life and truly motivated behavioral change, we could only hope that she would be an ambassador of ours and recommend us to her friends when they become pregnant. I'll admit, we haven't yet tapped into the referral/loyalty part yet but is something I'm very keen on building out. In my past, customers who came as a referral of past customers tended to be the most loyal and engaged users.

      Second, we've heard from second-time moms that they needed Nutrimom more than ever, as their second pregnancies are so different from their first. Therefore, it's important for her to keep us top of mind when she gets back into the journey and we do this through multiple channels that follow her journey, from social media, to bloggers, to CRM. The key is to always provide value. Even though we don't coach past the 2 year birthday, we can still provide value through content beyond this time period.

      4 Share
  • JP

    John Phamvan

    over 2 years ago #

    Hi Irina,

    While you would want moms to pick the best plan for them, how do you balance that vs the need to monetize at the highest level possible (eg more users pick the premium or all-inclusive plans vs core)?

    • IB

      Irina Barskiy

      over 2 years ago #

      Great question. When we initially started out, we had just one coaching plan - the premium. We had a lot of women who would be active with coaching one month and schedule multiple calls with their coach, and not so active another month, and only would message occasional questions. It's understandable when you think about the different stages a woman goes through in pregnancy and post birth. There are times she's doing heavy research on next steps (like when preparing for birth or transitioning her baby to solid foods), and other moments when she's just trying to survive (after delivery). Therefore, we realized we needed to offer two different kind of plans that she can potentially switch between based on her needs. The other rationale was that many people don't know how important nutrition is in their 1,000 day journey (from first day of pregnancy until their baby is 2), and so if she is curious enough to try the core plan, she may likely want to upgrade to that more dedicated support where she can work on more specific goals that are more long-term. At the end of the day, it's all about what our costumer needs and values, and it's up to us to provide her the right experience at the right time.

  • AL

    Arsene Lavaux

    over 2 years ago #

    Bonjour Irina,

    Looking forward to your AMA.

    A couple of questions for you:

    1) What are the differences between leading growth at small startup structures vs. larger corporations?
    2) Do yoga and growth marketing have anything in common?

    Merci beaucoup!

    • IB

      Irina Barskiy

      over 2 years ago #

      Bonjour Arsene! Not having to wonder if you'll get a paycheck the following week! Haha kidding. Kind of.

      In my experience, startups are more open to change and trying new things, since you're starting with a relatively blank slate. With larger corporations, there is more hesitation and its harder to get buy-in from executives to try new things. When I was at FlatRate Moving, this was particularly challenging. It was a successful company that was around for over 25 years, but very old school when it came to marketing. I had to do a lot of convincing to be open to change and trying new things and was faced with a lot of skepticism.

      4 Share
    • IB

      Irina Barskiy

      over 2 years ago #

      2. I love this question! And yes....totally! Both require you to be open to change. More importantly, I think yoga carries over a lot into my professional life. It helps bring clarity and focus in the present moment, which is so important in growth marketing, where it can sometimes feel like you're swimming at super speeds and forget to come up for air. There's always so much to do and that's when my yoga kicks in and helps me take a much needed pause to assess things. What are the priorities? What is the most important thing I can do in this very moment? Am I using right now to the max potential? I find I sometimes get caught up in the little things that I almost have to stop and remember the high-level objectives.

  • DH

    Dani Hart

    over 2 years ago #

    Hi Irina,

    Thanks for joining us! Really excited to hear your perspective on growth.

    1. Are there any challenges that you face when it comes to acquisition and growth because of the fact that Nutrimom is part of a larger brand?
    2. How important is company culture at Nutrimom in achieving growth? Can you elaborate on any steps you've taken to embrace the growth mindset at a company owned by Dannon?
    3. How is your team structured? Do you use shared resources or are there dedicated resources for growth?

    Can't wait to read your answers!

    Cheers,
    Dani

    • IB

      Irina Barskiy

      over 2 years ago #

      2. So important! I was very pleasantly surprised when I joined the company. Danone is SO big on encouraging entrepreneurial mindsets, and is one of the key values they look for when hiring new candidates. Every employee (no matter what brand you're under) has to undergo training on a model we call CODE. It stands for Commited (to challenge the status quo, to inspire and be the vision), Open (develop authentic relationships through generous listening and value different opinions), Doer (experiment, speak up, make tough decisions, solve complex problems with smart, pragmatic solutions, set priorities, show resilience and tenacity) and Empowerd (engage and align teams, be passionate for people growth, demonstrate healthy ambition, seek feedback on oneself.). It's not just something fancy to put on employee booklets, but it really is a culture we live each day and allows us to work to our full potential. Growth is difficult when operating in silos...so collaboration is so important. Our CEO encourages us to be curious, ask questions, and challenge one another. We're also encouraged to not be afraid of failure, so long as we can fail quickly and learn from it. This kind of culture is soooo important because we work so much smarter when we're not afraid. We aren't afraid to ask each other questions or challenge each other's thoughts. I could be thinking something is a good idea, and then our Head of Operations will ask a question that would make me see it from a different angle. We have regular team meetings where all functions are present. Every single person is involved in marketing, whether you're in finance or in opps. We all touch the customer in one way or another, so it's important that we're working collaboratively and closely.

      4 Share
      • DH

        Dani Hart

        over 2 years ago #

        I love the CODE guidelines and couldn't agree more with your perspective. :) Thanks for sharing!

    • IB

      Irina Barskiy

      over 2 years ago #

      Hi there, Dani!

      1. I think the biggest challenge is on the legal side of things. Being a startup under a big company, every little thing needs legal approval. From ad copy, to emails, to every social media post...legal has got to look it over. It was definitely a new thing for me to deal with coming from smaller startups. It certainly slows down the process a bit, which is something a startup can't afford. By the time legal gets back with comments or edits, we're already working on something new so that definitely has its challenges.

    • IB

      Irina Barskiy

      over 2 years ago #

      We're pretty lean. The marketing team is currently 2 full-time people, including myself. The only shared resources we use with Danone is HR, legal, and finance. Outside of that, we rely a lot on agencies/partners including development, design, media.

  • ES

    Eduardo Bernabe Sacahui Diaz

    over 2 years ago #

    Hello,

    I am a robot software developer, and I would like to ask you what challenges have you encounter when dealing with developers or even with workforce? This is maybe related -but more specific -to Glen Harper's question.

    regards,

    • IB

      Irina Barskiy

      over 2 years ago #

      Hi Eduardo! I think there are always challenges for marketers when dealing with developers. You guys ALWAYS have your hands full. And we marketers always want to develop new initiatives that we need development help for a majority of the time. In most startups, resources are limited and developers usually have their plans for months or a year ahead, so squeezing things in between the never-ending list of priorities is tough!

  • JA

    Justin Adelson

    over 2 years ago #

    Hello, Irina - thank you for volunteering your time today!

    Nutrimom is a mom-niche product, but that doesn't mean it can be easy to reach your market and make conversions:

    1. What are some of the challenges you face when reaching your target audience?
    2. What marketing and growth strategies has worked the best during the early growth stages at Nutrimom?

    Thanks again!

  • JM

    Jason Meresman

    over 2 years ago #

    Hi Irina - Thanks for joining us on today's AMA!

    It looks like Nutrimom is focused on the first 1000 days of pregnancy and motherhood. Are there any programs in place to extend the lifetime value of a customer beyond 1000 days?

  • PH

    Paul Hopkins

    over 2 years ago #

    Hi Irina. What has been your best approach to target expecting mothers please? Thanks in advance.

  • MD

    Mark Anthony de Jesus

    over 2 years ago #

    Hi Irina,

    Thanks for doing this. Being a new dad that tries to keep mom active and eating right, this is something that hits close to home. Since all moms and babies are different, I'd be interested in hearing how you segmented your various cohorts and what type of mom responded to the various a/b tests. More specifically was it with the expecting moms or new moms?

    Also... are there plans for a Nutridad? :)

  • NA

    Nour Aoun

    over 2 years ago #

    Hello Irina,
    I'm curious to know more about the future you see for Nutrimom.
    First, what were the challenges you faced as a startup?
    - Do you think there's a lot of competition now?
    - Where do you see Nutrimom 5 to 10 years from now?
    - Would you consider targeting and focusing on other countries?

    • IB

      Irina Barskiy

      over 2 years ago #

      Hi Nour!

      1. Great question. As with any startup, there are so many challenges but I think the biggest was the need to educate our target audience. Many women don't realize how important nutrition is during pregnancy and after birth. It's surprising how many pregnant women think "oh well I'm going to gain weight anyway, so I may as well eat ice cream and anything that I want." In reality, what you do and eat in the first 1,000 days of a baby's life (from first day of pregnancy until they're two) actually influences their lifelong health. Genetics influence at most 20%, where as environment is almost 80%, so the power is in the mom's hands! So educating them on why nutrition is so important during this stage is absolutely critical. Otherwise, people don't know what they don't know and its so challenging to communicate all this on a small banner ad or even in a paragraph. We've had to get creative to tell our story.

      Another challenge was communication of our value proposition. We had such a complex offering. We have an app that provides coaching. We sell products. We had varying levels of subscriptions depending on whether you were doing just coaching or products as well, and which products, etc. I think providing too many choices overwhelms people...especially when it's their first interaction with a brand. It took us some time to get it right, but we had to strip it down to basics. For a while, we took the products off our site completely to make it simpler.

    • IB

      Irina Barskiy

      over 2 years ago #

      2. Competition? Oh yeah. Coaching in a digital environment is growing. You have the fitness coaching apps like Wello, Rise for eating right/weight loss, even an app that lets you speak to a therapist. We're in the era of not needing to leave our houses ever again if we didn't want to. We're also playing in so many verticals with our product line.

    • IB

      Irina Barskiy

      over 2 years ago #

      I'll combine 3 & 4 here.

      3. Nutrimom started out of the mission to make the next generation a healthier than this one, and if more women had one-on-one guidance during this critical time, we can truly make an impact. We are considering doing studies on if we can truly impact behavior change that leads to healthier outcomes in babies. We're also working with other companies to offer Nutrimom in their benefits packages and are hoping to one day have Nutrimom coaching covered by health insurance. If that happens, it would be a game changer.

      4. Definitely. Danone's Early Life Nutrition division is a leader in Europe and Asia. But that's in the traditional CPG space. They're all looking at our team here in the US to see what we do with this "digital business" The global teams are looking to us to pass along our learnings so they can adapt in their local markets.

  • KA

    karim Abd El Kader

    over 2 years ago #

    Hi Irina,

    Thanks for conducting this AMA!!

    I think the most important thing in tech health is establishing trust and credibility among your target audience. How did you achieve this credibility among your users especially through content marketing?

    Many thanks.
    K.

    • IB

      Irina Barskiy

      over 2 years ago #

      Hi Karim,
      You are absolutely right. Trust and credibility is everything and was certainly challenging as a new brand. We concentrated on two things, our heritage and the expertise of our coaches. I still think we have a lot of work to do on the first one. We have been around for over 100 years in the maternal and infant nutrition space (crazy, right?!) and are leaders in European and Asian markets. However, despite the success and established reputation we have overseas, we are a newcomer to the US and had to start from scratch. We put a lot of focus on highlighting our science-based resources and the expertise of our coaches. There's a lot of fluff out there on the internet...so much information (a lot of it conflicting) and you just don't know who to trust. All of our content and coaching is based on proven science. We partnered with Cornell University to create a special training in maternal and infant health that each of our coaches had to go through. All of them are Registered Dietitians and they're also moms so they can completely relate to what our moms/moms-to-be are going through. They can offer judgement-free advice because they've been there too. I think it's a big value proposition when you can offer advice she can trust, and cutting out all the noise in between. You can spend hours looking for answers between multiple sources, but knowing you have one source that can give you a personalized answer that you can rely on? It's such peace of mind.

  • JD

    James Dunn

    over 2 years ago #

    Hey Irina

    Is there something that you've learned from any of your consulting gigs that you've been able to apply to Nutrimom?
    What's been the highest impact thing you can think of that you could share with us?

    Thanks!

  • IB

    Ioana Budai

    over 2 years ago #

    Hy Irina, many thanks for being so generous.
    I was wondering which were the main struggles encountered by marketing teams you helped throughout your career.
    Which were the most pressing struggles in 2016 and what features would you expect to see from site audit tools that”d help marketing teams overcome said roadblocks?
    Also, what should marketing tools come up with to face 2017 and really innovate?

    Thanks in advance, looking forward to your response :)))

    • IB

      Irina Barskiy

      over 2 years ago #

      Hi Ioana! I think the main struggles I see among a lot of the teams I've worked with is attribution/tracking. It's shocking for me to see companies making millions of dollars and not understanding what to attribute it to. Without data, you're pretty much spending blindly and unable to make meaningful decisions.

      As for tools, I think there are so many great ones out there, however, not a single tool that encompasses it all. I rely on at least 4-5 different marketing tools on a daily basis that each have amazing benefits. It would be great if someone could take all these beautiful capabilities and wrap it up into one beautiful package! My ideal tool? One that can measure data from creative->source->sign up with all the steps in between, allow for a/b testing, as well as a full-suite communication offering (email, social, in-app, etc) that allows you to do some serious segmentation. There's a lot of tools which are great for each of these, but not one that combines all.

  • GP

    George Pitchkhadze

    over 2 years ago #

    Hey, Irina!

    My question is a little different. I'm a Russian citizen, and an English-language marketer. I'm kinda guessing, based on your name and surname, that you're from here too... How did you manage to get out? Any tips? :)

    Georgi

    • IB

      Irina Barskiy

      over 2 years ago #

      Hi Georgi! You guessed right :) I was actually born in Ukraine, but came to the US when I was just 4 years old...I have my parents to thank for that! That must be so interesting to market in a language different than the country's primary language!

  • KN

    Kevin Neary

    over 2 years ago #

    Hi Irina

    In your opinion how should DaaS companies approach growth hacking. Which techniques are most easily optimized for data services models.

    Kevin

  • MA

    Mélanie Almeida

    over 2 years ago #

    Hello Irina,
    Thanks for answering our questions.
    I work for a startups where our target is parent's teeangers.
    Have you struggled to attracts moms to your website or app ? What has been the best acquisition channel ?
    Do you have advice to connect with a non-techy audience for a tech product such as your website or app ?

    Thank you in advance for your advice.

  • SR

    Sam Reader

    over 2 years ago #

    Hi Irina,

    Great to have the opportunity to hear your key insights.

    When it comes to acquisition and retention of your customers, what is the one key metric that you prioritise above all else? Do you have a key metric that you know reflects the longevity of retaining customers?

    Thanks and good luck with everything.

  • JL

    Jeff LeBrun

    over 2 years ago #

    Hello Irina,

    Expecting mothers are considered to be one of the most attractive customer types out there by online retailers, and so there is a lot of competition for their awareness and attention. How have you pursued getting traffic in a cost-effective way?

    - Jeff

    • IB

      Irina Barskiy

      over 2 years ago #

      Hi Jeff,

      You're right - it's a highly sought after audience and there's a lot of competition for it out there! We know millenials are using social media more than ever, and it's even more true for expecting moms. The scale at which you can reach expecting moms and the targeting capabilities don't get better than with social platforms. It never fails to amaze me how niche you can get with your targeting parameters!

  • NS

    Natalie Sie

    over 2 years ago #

    Hi Irina, thanks for sharing! I am always interested in learning about great marketers successful stories....and failures! I think those last ones are an awesome learning tool. Can you share any failure story you have learned from?

  • TT

    Thomas Truong

    over 2 years ago #

    Hey Irina, how many buyer personas do you have?

  • IB

    Irina Barskiy

    over 2 years ago #

    My time here is up! This has been a ton of fun and I'm sorry I couldn't get to all the questions! I will try to go back and answer some, but please feel free to reach out to me on twitter (@sobarskiy) or LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/in/ibarskiy/). Thanks everyone for your great questions!

  • MA

    Mark Armstrong

    over 2 years ago #

    Darn missed that #BossLady!

  • HM

    Hunbbel Meer

    over 2 years ago #

    Hi Irina,

    Thanks for doing this! As a head of growth in a relatively narrowed niche, which was the biggest challenge you faced in terms of customer acquisition and making a dent in an already-crowded niche? And how did you solve that challenge?

    Thanks :)

  • AS

    Amandeep Singh

    over 2 years ago #

    Hi Irina,
    Mostly we read case studies and stories of campaigns of big companies or startups with huge money in their bank, but how does an early stage, bootstrapped startup make a buzz. We hear word-of-mouth is the way to go, but how exactly can a startup with a very low budget spread the awareness. It would be great if you could share 1 or 2 quick tactics that worked for you while you were working in some early stage startup.

  • MM

    Michael Makdah

    over 2 years ago #

    Hello Irina,
    Its not really a question just wanted to the direction your attention to your website that seems to have some issue on the bottom.

    http://irinamikheyeva.com/

    Warning: file() [function.file]: php_network_getaddresses: getaddrinfo failed: Name or service not known in /home/content/57/9046157/html/IrinaMikheyeva/wp-includes/template-loader.php on line 87

    Warning: file(http://www.sonao.fr/hacklinks/0926links.txt) [function.file]: failed to open stream: php_network_getaddresses: getaddrinfo failed: Name or service not known in /home/content/57/9046157/html/IrinaMikheyeva/wp-includes/template-loader.php on line 87

  • YG

    Yasang Guo

    about 2 years ago #

    Hello Irina,I have a little problem and I need your help.I live in China but I cannot get in to nutrimom.com. And I check nutrimom on twitter,but the last tweet was released in2016,so can you provide me any access to nutrimom? Many thanks~

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