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Dani Hart is a sustainable growth practitioner, currently traveling the world and learning as much as she can along the way.

 

Putting her degrees in Marketing and Environmental Studies to work,  Dani began her career testing new online strategies with international nonprofits to help increase donations and action. Managing a/b tests, campaign development, and email production for Defenders of Wildlife, WWF, Human Rights Campaign, and Save the Chimps.

After following her h(e)art and moving to California, Dani worked remote for a year before transitioning to Payoff, a fintech startup helping U.S. citizens pay off credit card debt and reach financial freedom. During this time she worked with Dr. Galen Buckwalter to begin using psychology and personality insights to enhance marketing segmentation and optimization.

Dani joined the GrowthHackers team and worked her way up to Head of Growth. Together, Dani and Sean Ellis produced the 2017 and 2018 GrowthHackers Conference agenda, along with all of the logistics of the event. She got her hands on anything and everything. Managing the marketing efforts for GrowthHackers’ software NorthStar, writing for the GrowthHackers Blog, learning from growth experts, and managing the growth process for the team were among her favorites.

In August 2018, Dani left her full-time role with GrowthHackers, began her own growth consultancy, Growth Gal and jumped into new learning goals around yoga, burnout, and applying psychometrics at scale with psyML. Dani is now traveling the world, 3 months at a time, currently residing in Greece.

If you have questions about sustainable growth (personal or company-wide), yoga, running, psychometrics, traveling, working remote, etc. Dani’s ready to answer them on March 7th at 9:30am PT / 6:30pm CET.

  • CS

    Claire Suellentrop

    8 months ago #

    Dani, super excited for your AMA!

    I'm guessing there will be lots of questions about lessons learned at Growthhackers -- so, taking a different track, I'm eager to hear what you're learning in your work with psyML so far. Any interesting "aha" moments at the intersection of personality insights & growth?

    • DH

      Dani Hart

      7 months ago #

      Hi Claire, awesome question to think about.

      Psychology and personality insights have been used in marketing for eons, but I think it’s not until recently that with the introduction of big data, it’s become accessible to such a wide audience.

      I think my biggest “aha” moment was when I realized how varied the applications of psychometrics are and how the incentives behind using the personality insight is typically tied to an organization’s user growth, without explicit thought on how that growth may impact society at large.

      Let’s see if I can unravel that a bit.

      We want more users, so we figure out how to attract more of them using personality insight. We want more engagement, so we show people who usually engage with a certain topic, more of that certain topic. Or we want more voters to vote for us, so we convince people to vote our way while suppressing the voters of the other candidate.

      When we have the personality insight of individuals or groups, we can understand what makes them tick (or not tick) and how to best communicate with them.

      But what happens when using psychometrics for organizations’ user growth works? When we have 1.5 billion users addicted to a platform that’s causing mental health problems and an overwhelming onset of irrational fear? When thought echo-chambers lead real people down a rabbit hole of conspiracy theories and even to commit suicide? https://twitter.com/gchaslot/status/1094359564559044610 When individuals give up their freedom to vote by unconsciously being persuaded by ads from the opposing party or oversea bots?

      Can we just roll-back to our previous release? Unfortunately, it’s not that easy. The effects of using psychometrics in this way are very difficult to track and have lasting influence on society.

      Psychometrics can be amazing for growth, but if we’re using personality insight to help grow something quickly, without transparency and a measured approach of how the growth may create unintended consequences, we can easily get ourselves into scary situations.

      While I’m glad that the Cambridge Analytica scandal brought light to what I call the “bad actors” of psychometrics, I think a better use of personality insight may be within the product itself and geared toward individual growth, not organizations’ user growth.

      I like to consider the questions that will hopefully move our society forward using psychometrics. How can we help people become more aware of their personality strengths and weaknesses to teach them how to build resiliency, manage fear, work with others, and have more meaningful connection with themselves and others? How can we provide transparency around what we will use their data for and provide explicit feedback on their situation. In a nutshell, how can we put the consumer in charge of their own growth instead of forcing them to be products of large machines?

      At psyML, we create specific use-case (explicit) assessments that come with feedback for both the end user and the administering party. We created one for physicians to better understand the personality of their patients, so that the physicians can better deliver intervention and treatment programs, and patients can work within their own strengths for improved health. We also created an assessment that helps high-performance coaches understand their team and use that insight to guide the coaching process. In both of these assessments, we give the individual feedback on everything that was assessed.

      I know the folks at The Predictive Index are using psychometrics to help teams build better teams, also giving feedback along the way.

      When we look at psychometrics as a way to build real value for individuals, put the individual in charge, and think through/monitor the impact it has on society, I think we will succeed.

      Thanks for asking such a thought provoking question! I’m sure my thoughts will evolve over time, but this is where my head is at currently.

      5 Share
    • AG

      Ashley Greene

      7 months ago #

      Great question!

  • PC

    Pedro Clivati

    8 months ago #

    Hey, Dani!

    Thank you so much for doing this. You and Sean have taken GH a long way, it's no easy job to keep up with such great work. My questions go around two different spheres:

    [GrowthHacking] In your opinion and experience, what are the biggest mistakes companies do when implementing a growth process in their organization - and how to avoid that?

    [Life] What impact did Yoga had in your personal and professional life?

    6 Share
    • DH

      Dani Hart

      7 months ago #

      Hi Pedro,

      Great questions. Thanks for asking.

      Here's my answer to #1 regarding Growth Hacking...

      There are a couple of mistakes companies make when implementing a growth process.

      One is not focusing on the foundations first. If you don’t know who your target customer is and how your product provides value to them, and have a clear way for that customer to get to the value, then what will you be growing? Companies that try growing without the foundations typically look at acquisition as their key to success. What I consider the “quick fix” mentality or looking for an easy win. News flash! Acquisition channels are crowded enough as it is, if you can’t clearly explain to your audience the value your product will give them, you will blow your money and have nothing to show for it. Focus on validating your idea, getting your first customers, and learning everything you can from them. Then, once you can replicate a successful customer, re-evaluate the market and what size company that may yield, as this may be different than your initial hypothesis. Then, put a growth process in place to find more customers like the successful ones you already have and learn along the way.

      Another mistake is implementing something they heard or read verbatim, considering it “done”, then months down the road saying the growth process didn’t work. I think every growth process should have a growth process. Meaning that a team might start with a suggested framework, but then it’s their duty to iterate on what works for learning about the growth of the business together. The growth leader should continue to prioritize the process, build a habit of testing, introduce customer and employee feedback loops, create a culture of experimentation and learning, and improve engagement, communication, and efficiency of the team.

      • DH

        Dani Hart

        7 months ago #

        Yoga. Where do I start? I practicing yoga regularly after I injured myself a few times playing soccer and running. I used to take out all of my stress through these activities. I’d train for marathons (which I wrote about how that relates to growth here: https://growthgal.com/running-a-marathon-isnt-easy-neither-is-growth/), chase the endorphin high, and block out anything stressful on my mind.

        Once I started practicing yoga outside weekly, it quickly became the glue holding me together. It was an hour where I unplugged, didn’t look at a screen, and I didn’t think about anything outside of myself. I focused on my breath (pranayama), how different poses (asanas) felt in my body, and finished class with meditation. Every class had a positive intention to bring our attention to and I’d bring my attention back to that intention throughout the week.

        This weekly class recharged my battery. Although I didn’t leave as tired as I would from running, my head was left much clearer.

        While I was going through my 200RYT training to become a yoga teacher, I began a daily yoga practice. It’s not always an hour long and some days it’s much more restorative and relaxing than others, but I make a point to come back to myself and search inward for my truth daily. Now I get the feeling of having a clear head, every day. It’s something I think I’d have a hard time living without now that I know what it’s like.

        Yoga is Sanskrit for “union” and is intended for you to realize your full potential connectedness with yourself, others, and nature. There are actually 8 limbs of yoga:

        Yamas & niyamas: 10 ethical precepts that allow us to be at peace with ourselves, our family, and community.

        Asanas: Poses that help keep the body strong, flexible, and relaxed.

        Pranayama: Breathing practices that help us develop constancy in the movement of life force (our breath)

        Pratyahara: Drawing our attention toward silence rather than towards things.

        Dharana: Focusing attention and cultivating inner perceptual awareness.

        Dhyana: Sustaining awareness under all conditions.

        Samadhi: Returning the mind into original silence.

        At first these sounded a little out there to me, but when I took time to study each limb, I began to realize that practice in each of these areas truly helps me live my best life. I feel much more at peace than I ever have in life, and joy comes much easier.

        In terms of professional life, I think it’s helped me zoom out to bigger picture and help me find confidence in my own path. I care less about what others think of me and make my own decisions. We all get one life and each one of us has it within us to set forward on our own journey. I also find it easier to manage stress and increase focus with a daily yoga practice.

        2 Share
  • MV

    Maja Voje

    7 months ago #

    Hey Dani, I am so inspired by you. You have always been a role model for this community and I am so happy that you are following your dreams and doing what is the best for you and the world. I'd be very interested in learning how do you work with non for profits. What are some metrics examples, do they build growth teams, is it very different than working for for-profit organisations? Keep on rocking and thanks for keep on shining your bright light to this community. Much love & if you ever visit Slovenia, I'll take you to the best places in the city. Much love and gratitude, Maja.

    • DH

      Dani Hart

      7 months ago #

      Hi Maja!

      So good to hear from you. What you said means a lot and let me just say the feeling is mutual!

      My experience with nonprofits has been on the online fundraising side, which is arguably the most fun given how quickly you get campaign and test results. I have been out of the nonprofit industry for over 5 years, so I’m not sure if they have explicit growth teams now, but at the time it was mostly online strategy teams that incorporated other representatives from the organization when necessary. Since a majority of the nonprofits I worked with supported the larger mission through online fundraising, it was just one of the channels they raised funds, but also the fastest growing channel. We planned and launched a lot of multi-channel campaigns that included social media leads, event leads, and sometimes the director of the organization.

      The metrics we followed closely were total donations, average donation, number of donors, total sustaining donations, average sustaining donations, number of sustaining donors, number of actions taken, number of social shares after action taken, and number of email subscribers. These were all leading indicators of how much impact the organization could make as all of the money and action tied to the programs the organization executed.

      In general, I didn’t find it too different than working in a for-profit organization. I was also technically working for a for-profit organization since I was working at an agency that served nonprofits specifically.

  • SE

    Sean Ellis

    7 months ago #

    Hi Dani, awesome to have you back to GH for an AMA. My question for you is: what is the most important thing you’ve learned about growth since leaving GH and how did you learn it?

    • DH

      Dani Hart

      6 months ago #

      Hey Sean!

      Glad to be here once again, yet on the other side. I think that means I made it, right? ;)

      I think the most important thing I've learned about growth since leaving GrowthHackers is that the methodology doesn't ONLY relate to growing companies. In fact, you can apply the growth methodology to personal growth, a relationship with a loved one, career growth, etc. I've been exploring the personal growth side for a while now and it's clear there's a pattern.

      I'll explain my personal growth methodology so you can see the stark similarities.

      It all starts with self discovery.
      Am I healthy (diet, sleep, exercise)? What are my core values? What are my personality strengths? Am I motivated by behavioral inhibition or activation (carrot or stick)? What are the learning goals I have for myself? Am I surrounded by the right people? Do I have negative thoughts, judgements, and limiting beliefs that race in my head? Do I know how to relax? Am I fulfilling the rest part of the stress + rest = growth equation? Do I have a North Star I aim towards in my own life? I wrote about my own North Star here in this answer: http://growthhackers.com/amas/dani-hart-founder-of-growth-gal-former-head-of-growth-at-growthhackers#comment-93259

      Next step is applying the growth process.
      Once I've started going through these questions and any others that help me turn inwards, it's time to find an area of opportunity to work on. Maybe I'm not getting good sleep, or I don't know how to relax. Maybe it's learning how to live within my core values. Then I'll turn to that area and apply the growth process. I come up with a bunch of ideas and start testing until I find something that works or until another area becomes more optimal to focus on.

      Then, it's regularly monitoring the North Star and reprioritizing.
      The idea of a personal North Star has been super helpful for me to ensure I'm living an intentional life. Once that will bring me long-term happiness or fulfillment. I check in with it regularly and look for areas of improvement that support it.

      Personal growth is an ongoing positive feedback loop.

      Now, how did I learn this? A combination of the experience in growth roles, conversations with my mentors including you, and LOTS of yoga. Yoga is Sanskrit for union and is a discipline to improve/develop one's inherent power in a balanced manner. It offers the means to attain complete self-realization. When I went through yoga teacher training after GrowthHackers, we were taught that every class should have a clear intention... a theme we guide the students through. I taught my first class with the intention of "growth" and as the words flowed through my mouth, I realized I was saying almost identical things as to what I'd say in conversations during my time at GrowthHackers. It was my "aha moment."

      Thanks for the thought-provoking question. Definitely got me thinking! :)

      Cheers!

  • JS

    Jarrod Stringer

    8 months ago #

    Hi Dani! I feel behind because I didn't even know what an AMA was. I'm like, "American Medical Association?" Oh well lol. I have a question about what drew you to Growth Hacking and if/how your move to Europe piqued other aspects of this passion. I.e., do you anticipate expanding your concept of growth in your exposure to different cultures and different modes of being/function/operation? Or maybe you're just hacking your own growth lol : ) I may have other questions later, but that's what's on my mind for now.

    4 Share
    • DH

      Dani Hart

      7 months ago #

      Hey Jarrod,

      When I first started at GrowthHackers, I didn’t know what an AMA was either, so you’re not alone!

      Let’s see. I think I’ve been more or less growth hacking since I entered the workforce after college. I started my career doing online fundraising for nonprofits. The international nonprofits I worked with were experimental and knew that if they tried changing an ask string or a button on a donation form, the results might vary dramatically. It’s kind of in a nonprofit's DNA to be scrappy and test new things. More money = more impact.

      I was running pretty complex A/B tests with large audiences and also helping to build larger experiments like launches of online adoption catalogs. This taught me a lot about how to test, which transferred into my following roles. Here’s an article I wrote on the industry blog about the importance of testing. https://www.dmaw.org/blog/mobile-first-mentality-testing-will-move-organization-forward-digital-marketing/ That was back in 2013. :P

      2 Share
      • DH

        Dani Hart

        7 months ago #

        As for the second question, you’re absolutely right! I think a big component of being good at growth is having the ability to zoom out, look at the big picture and identify the biggest area of opportunity and then zoom in to the identified area of opportunity to focus on. By moving to Europe, and traveling around to different cultures, I’m zooming out to understand more of the playing field.

        Europe as a civilization is much older, although not the oldest, and I think we have a lot to learn from its history. So, my goals while traveling are to understand the similarities and differences between cultures, learn more about history to better understand our current environment, meet people with diverse perspectives, and cut living costs where we can.

        Eventually, I’m sure I’ll have a “big opportunity” that will arise and I’ll zoom in to focus. Until then, I’ll be bouncing around learning along the way.

        On the personal side, I will say that my boyfriend and I have made our own growth process for traveling. We’re learning to live with each other, manage our emotions and fears, find ways to increase productivity and relaxation, and have some fun. We learn from what does and doesn't work and apply it moving forward. So yes, hacking our own growth indeed.

        3 Share
  • AF

    Alexandre Ferrari

    8 months ago #

    Hi, Dani!
    Looking at marketing segmentation based on the psychological aspect. There´re many ways to trigger specific moment/pain to bring targeted messages to personas. What the best ways (platforms, ads formats or others) you see from now to trigger by people thoughts and/or feelings?
    Thank you so much!

    • ES

      Eric S

      7 months ago #

      Awesome!

    • DH

      Dani Hart

      7 months ago #

      Hi Alexandre,

      It's nice to hear from you.

      I'm not sure I understand what you're asking here. Do you mind rephrasing?

      Thanks,
      Dani

      • DH

        Dani Hart

        6 months ago #

        Let's see how I can unpack this one.

        Psychometrics are objective measurements of psychology. Personality traits, cognitive function, emotional states, resilience, attitudes, personal values, abilities, skills and knowledge are all measurements that can be assessed and evaluated at scale.

        In general, I don't think psychometric-based advertising is limited to one channel or ad format, rather a way to best understand your audience and how they would like to be spoken to. Using psychometrics for advertising is only as impactful as your understanding as a marketer of personality, emotional states, sentiment, etc. of your audience. In essence, how strong is your empathy?

        I would recommend looking at it a different way and start not on advertising, but with providing value to your existing customers. How can you learn from your most engaged customers and provide them with value in a personalized way? Well, help them better understand themselves in context to what you provide.

        For example, at Payoff we offered a personalized loan to help people pay off their credit card debt. While we did plenty of advertising and direct marketing, a big value add for existing AND new prospects was our financial personality quiz. In less than 5 minutes, we could understand what type of personality (at the time we used the OCEAN model) they were strong in, and give them a feedback on how their personality impacts the way they save and spend. Our goal was to bring awareness to the end user. Help them better understand themselves so they can make better decisions. The Payoff team also grew to understand these personalities well. Our customer success team knew what their personality was and with training, could email and chat with them in their preferred style.

        I'm not sure where the financial personality quiz lives currently, but you can see a breakdown of the different personalities and their descriptions here: https://www.payoff.com/life/science/what-are-the-financial-personalities/.

        To your comment on AdWords and Google Search, I agree users are are actively looking for something. These are channels that tell you the person has high intent for what you provide.

        2 Share
      • AF

        Alexandre Ferrari

        7 months ago #

        Hi Dani,
        Sure!

        I'm looking at psychometric-based ad targeting and thinking what the experiences you can share about that. =) When we do campaigns addressing peoples pains/difficulties, we can use many channels or ad formats, there's some ad format or channel particularly good for that kind of targeting (psychometric-based)?

        As an example, normally people who come from AdWords at Google Search are actively looking for something. That's a good ad format and channel to capture this moment.

        Please, let me know if I did rephrase accordingly. =)
        Thank you so much,
        Ale

      • AF

        Alexandre Ferrari

        6 months ago #

        Hi, Dani! You did unpack flawlessly. =) Your point bringing the importance of empathy is gold. Many times is not see as a key as needed. Thank you so much! Ale

  • DH

    Dani Hart

    7 months ago #

    Hi everyone, this has been so much fun!

    I've run out of time for today, it's getting late here in Greece.

    I will come back over the next week to finish answering your questions, so feel free to leave one if you haven't already.

    Cheers & Namaste,
    Dani

  • JS

    Jarrod Stringer

    8 months ago #

    Oh yeah, I forgot my other question: What triggered your interest in burnout and how has this shaped your approach to your own work? Is there even a way out in a society that tells you your value is tied to your productivity?

    • DH

      Dani Hart

      7 months ago #

      Burnout is super interesting to me because we’re now at a point in time where it’s pretty close to impossible to fully unplug and disconnect. In the not so distant past, when people like my parents, left their jobs for the day, the only way to get ahold of them was to beep them. Vacations and weekends were taken without any contact with work. Then the phones came along, and then email, and now cell phones with email, Slack, Facebook, Twitter, etc.

      After 14 years of hard work, 10 of which I was working multiple jobs, I realized that I was having a hard time feeling like I was ready to start again on Monday mornings. I think the best way to explain the way I began feeling was apathy, which I’ve come to learn is a common symptom of burnout.

      At the same time, I was talking to my brother, who had been flying every week and working odd hours for work and was also experiencing his own version of burnout. Then I talked to an old boss who had shared about her recent story with burnout. It seemed to be all around me, yet I never really discussed it with anyone before. I became intrigued by the topic at that point and imagined personality had something to do with the way and to what extent we burn ourselves out and how we manage it.

      I decided it was best to take some down time to learn how to relax, learn more about myself, and begin building my resilience. In this time I've realized how many societal pressures I let influence my everyday. I “should” have a full-time desk job and I “should” make more money every year or I’m a failure, were a few of the many limiting beliefs I had to part ways with.

      I crafted my own core values and have used them as a guide for making decisions ever since. I no longer base my decisions on what society is telling me to do. I seek validation internally, which admittedly isn’t always easy. I’ve come to learn this way of thinking was something Socrates in Ancient Greece was eventually executed for… but we’ve come a long way since then.

      In general I think the inward validation that helps us move away from societal pressure is really just searching for and leading with our “why,” which according to Simon Sinek, is how a successful leader inspires action. https://www.ted.com/talks/simon_sinek_how_great_leaders_inspire_action?language=en

  • NV

    Nicolás Vargas

    8 months ago #

    Hi Dani, Thanks for doing this AMA

    I was wondering, 1) how did you develop and maintain your "what can I learn from this?" Mindset? - I'm working on a new project with college students and I think your experience and advice will help me a lot.

    Additionally, It would be great if you can share your thoughts on

    2)What are one to three books that have greatly influenced your life?
    3)What advice would you give to a smart, driven college student about to enter the “Growth” Industry? What advice should they ignore?

    Cheers

    • DH

      Dani Hart

      7 months ago #

      Hi! Thanks for the questions. :)

      The "what can I learn from this" mindset takes practice, and in the beginning, a lot of reminding myself to focus on the learning. To build my habit, I told myself… every time I’m frustrated, upset, or mad, I’m going to ask myself “what can I learn from this?” I answered that question in journals and in my head when I would go for walks or runs.

      The goal is to use any time your brain reacts emotionally to engage your rational brain and respond with something productive. If something fails, ask how? If something goes well, ask why? These questions will lead to some productive learning thoughts and conversations.

      I’ve also been looking at life as a series of tests for the last decade or so, which certainly helps. I’m guessing I get that from my parents as they’ve created an environment to take risks and fail, as long as I can learn from it.

      Some examples of life tests: If I quit coffee, how will my body respond? Can I do yoga every day? If I do yoga every day, how do I feel? Will going for a walk in the morning help me become a morning person? Etc.

      2 Share
      • DH

        Dani Hart

        7 months ago #

        Question 2...

        Just three books? That’s hard. :)

        I think I’ll go with the following:

        Power of Now - I read this right after college and it taught me how to live consciously in the present moment, reducing anxiety and regretful thoughts.

        The Secret History of the War on Cancer - opened my eyes to how deceptive the marketing industry can be and how I never want to contribute to corporations without a conscious.

        It Starts with Food - the book along with actually participating in the Whole30 taught me how much sugar, salt, and preservatives are added to our food and the health issues they lead to. I've looked at food differently ever since.

        3 Share
      • DH

        Dani Hart

        7 months ago #

        Question 3...

        My advice would be to find a mentor or multiple mentors and keep in regular contact with them. I believe my mentors combined with my willingness to learn and work hard are the reasons I am where I am today. My mentors have been my supporters, my sponsors, and my kick in the butt when I needed it.

        Also, no matter how uncomfortable it is to network, do it anyway. Network at events and online. If you’re nervous, go talk to the person standing by themselves, because they are just as nervous or maybe more nervous than you. Relationships help move you forward in your career.

        Contribute to communities as much as you ask from them, if not more. Volunteer to be a guest blogger, start writing, and welcome feedback. You probably won’t be good at it at first, but over time you will develop writing skills and speaking to a specific audience.

        Remember that everything is moving so quickly and you’ll need to constantly learn to stay relevant. Ask questions early to learn as much as you can about your customer, product, and competitive market. Continue your education (there are plenty of free resources online), stay humble and hungry.

        Learn how to rest and relax. Take vacations where you unplug and check in with yourself. Your health, both mental and physical comes first. If you’re unwell, how do you expect to serve others?

        Learn how to breathe. Seriously, learn how to take deep and controlled breaths that use your full lung capacity. They will be helpful when you get stressed, and when practiced regularly, will help you live a healthy life.

  • VK

    Vrushal kapadnis

    7 months ago #

    Hi Dani,
    What is your GH process ?
    Thanks in advance

  • PV

    Philip Verghese Ariel

    7 months ago #

    I noticed from the bio that you learned from the growth experts learning from fellow beings and growth experts are really a wonderful opportunity. But my question to you is before getting such an opportunity to get acquainted with growth experts how did you learn? or let me put it this way, I am sure before reaching this present level I am sure you might have tried to learn many things on self. My question is self-learning or independent learning helped you in any way to reach to the success level?
    Thanks
    Philip
    @pvariel

    • DH

      Dani Hart

      7 months ago #

      Hi Philip, thanks for the question.

      I think research, self-taught skills, hard work, and networking are all contributors that led me to the wonderful opportunity of working with amazing growth experts.

      In every role I’ve had, my first step is to ask as many questions as necessary to understand from the team around me what expectations are and what I need to do to fulfill them. This took trial and error, but over time I got better at it. Once I mastered one role, I’d ask for more responsibility and repeat the process.

      I learned in the roles I took on, read books, and did a lot of research on whatever projects I was working on to ensure I was completing my work in the best possible way. For example, I learned HTML and CSS during my time doing email production, I learned how to write proposals and contracts when I began bringing in new clients, I read books on project management when I entered a project management role, and I mastered Marketo after a few months of email production in the system by reading tons of documentation and blog posts.

      I predict that in the future it will be really difficult to stay relevant in any kind of growth or marketing role without doing independent study.

  • JQ

    Jason Quey

    7 months ago #

    Hey, glad to see you back here, Dani!

    A couple questions:
    1. A lot of people online give a bad rap about going to college and getting a degree. Do you feel your marketing degree was worth the time/money cost? If so, how have you seen that to be true? If not, what do you wish you did instead?

    2. How do you see your services different than other marketing or growth consultancies?

    3. A spin-off of Peter Thiel: What's something related to growth that you believe is true that you believe most would not agree with you about?

    • DH

      Dani Hart

      7 months ago #

      Hi Jason, thanks for all of the questions. Its fun to be on the other side of this AMA for once. :)

      Question 1:
      My Marketing and Environmental Studies degrees were worth the time and money at that point in time and for me personally.

      In my opinion, a college degree should lead to a job market that can support the graduate and their ability to pay off their debt. It should also allow them to pursue their own “why” or how they want to serve the world. Many people go to college because it’s what is expected and they miss the importance of understanding the debt that comes along with tuition, how long it will take to pay off, how much their degree is actually worth in entry-level salary, and if they would even be happy with the career on the other side. This should be thought through before, not after, time and money are invested.

      Also, I think results for degrees vary by person. I did a lot of extracurriculars to gain real-life experience and grow my network. I learned that I’m the type of person that needs to apply my learning. I wasn’t a high test scorer, but I excelled at the applied learning which included managing recruitment for Panhellenic, founding a Women in Leadership organization, an international business case competition, and multiple marketing competitions. These were the experiences that led directly to my first full-time role out of college. I placed gold in a marketing competition for the DMAW-EF that gave me the opportunity to participate in a “mentor for a day” program that turned into an internship and then a full-time role once I graduated.

      I know other people I went to college with didn't use their degree at all. So, I think it totally depends on the person and the current environment.

      • DH

        Dani Hart

        7 months ago #

        Question 3:
        Ah, stirring the pot. I love it.

        More recently I’ve seen people proclaim they are passionate about SaaS and I call bluff. I don’t think someone can be truly passionate about SaaS - Software as a Service. I think people can be passionate about the problem they’re serving using SaaS, or they haven’t discovered what they really are passionate about and are GOOD at growing SaaS adoption.

        SaaS is a means to an end, either to solve a problem, or to try to get rich off of some recurring revenue and have a success story under your belt.

      • DH

        Dani Hart

        7 months ago #

        Question 2:
        My services currently are working with the companies that I personally believe in and want to support. My clients are personal relationships I’ve maintained over the years and people I enjoy working with. So I guess my differentiator is really aligned vision.

  • SA

    Selin Akkoç

    7 months ago #

    Hi Dani!

    Your journey is very interesting in the sense that it shows what can be achieved if there is a strong will accompanying one's actions. Loved it!

    I have a communication background, working and developing in the growth / data-driven marketing domain for 2 years now. Every now and then I find myself facing the dilemma of data-driven marketing, especially in this post- Cambridge Analytica times. I feel like what is being asked from me is to manipulate people, trick them into buying something. I really want to know more about the ethical aspect of growth.

    I wonder if there are resources/books that you can recommend on this particular topic.

    Thanks for your time & good luck on your transformational journey!

    • DH

      Dani Hart

      6 months ago #

      Hi Selin,

      Thank you for your thoughtful question. I also thank you for not ignoring your conscious! I believe we need more woke people in business, striving for impact first and profit second. We're a ways off from this type of work, but we're starting to see movement in the right direction, which is good! Now, how can we create more movement?

      I think it starts by learning from the "early adopters" of using business for good. I recommend reading the books detailing Patagonia (Let My People Go Surfing) and Toms (Start Something that Matters). As you're reading, think about how these businesses were able to charge premiums, spend minimally on marketing, create solutions as they problems arose, and create a lasting global impact. These are businesses that started with their goal to create impact, not the other way around. They won't give us all of our answers, but they certainly give us hope there is a better way to do business and some ideas for how to get started.

      I also think us marketers can all learn a lot from other disciplines. I studied Environmental Studies in addition to Marketing, which gave me a broader perspective on how marketing can be used to solve some of the worlds challenges (there are a lot). One book that left an impact during my studies was "The Secret History of the War on Cancer" and yes it's about as brutal as it sounds. It goes into the detail the corruption behind corporations and the lengths they go through to suppress research on the long-term effects of their products. YIKES! Modern day capitalism isn't as simple as a free market when lobbying is involved.

      Then, to paint a picture of our newest challenges, I recommend picking up "Irresistible: The Rise of Addictive Technology." It will take you through plenty of examples of behavioral addiction and its effects. This gave me good perspective of what we're up against and some ideas on how to combat it. I've personally taken steps to become aware of my own addiction and have been testing new ideas to take back my brain to live a healthier life.

      Then it comes down to you and your "why". I took some time about a year ago to discover my own core values and this gave me guidelines for my decisions moving forward. I used this guide to help me: https://scottjeffrey.com/personal-core-values/. Then, I challenged myself to live within my own values, because I believe that will lead to a life well spent. If the decisions you must make, such as being asked to manipulate people, do not support your values, then figure out the changes you need to make. There is always more than one way forward.

      I think that's where I'd start. I'm sure I'll have more to add in the near future as this is a topic I'm diving into Q2. :)

      All the best!
      Dani

  • AA

    Anuj Adhiya

    7 months ago #

    Hey Da Hart Attack!
    I can picture you doing this AMA from a cafe overlooking the canal right now...

    1. Now that you've moved from being an in-house growth person to one that's more plug and play - what do you think the advantages and disadvantages of each situation are and whether you have thoughts on when a company should pick in-house vs consultant?

    2. What do you think is the most impactful growth lesson you took away from your time at GH?

    3. Has there been a situation yet where you held a strong belief about some growth concept that has been proven not work/work as well in whatever you're doing now? If yes, talk more about that.
    If not, talk about the opposite scenario, ie what belief has been strengthened even further as being critical?

    Cheers!

    • DH

      Dani Hart

      6 months ago #

      #2

      Most impactful growth lesson I took away from my time at GH was that growth requires you to zoom out and understand the full picture. Understanding the full picture (everything from capital structure, burn rate, cash flow, board expectations, product usage, etc.) helps to minimize your own biases and build empathy for other parts of your team.

      Seeking to understand the whole growth system is much more productive than doing whatever you can to improve your own silo while the company at large fails. By zooming out, you can identify the biggest opportunities for growth, or put different, fix the most broken part of the growth system. This will require individuals and teams to put their egos and individual incentives aside and rally around the customers' success.

      Now, will every team be able to actually zoom out and shift their efforts when necessary? Absolutely not. Growth is really hard and getting much harder. In MarTech alone we have over 7,000 companies... which is way up from 150 in 2012. Growth today looks different than it did last year, let alone 10 years ago. The landscape is much more fragmented, dominant players control the market, consumer preferences are changing quicker than they have in the past, and attention is becoming more scarce.

      The companies that can zoom out, adapt to change, learn quickly, employ new ideas to improve the customer experience, and prioritize the customer will have the best chances of growing.

    • DH

      Dani Hart

      6 months ago #

      #3

      No strong beliefs that have proven not to work well, yet. So, I'll say the one belief that has been strengthened is how critical it is to know your ideal customer. Who they are, where they live, what they like to do, where they spend their time, etc. They will give you invaluable (and sometimes disheartening) insight if you let them. Don't be afraid of this. Embrace the good, bad, and the ugly and let it propel the business forward.

    • DH

      Dani Hart

      6 months ago #

      Hey Anuj!

      I actually moved to Greece last month. So unfortunately, I'm not looking out over a canal as I write this, although you're still welcome to believe that. ;)

      Good questions! Let's start with #1

      Advantages of in-house are that the growth person is always on, absorbing everything through osmosis. You can grab someone and go for a walk to discuss a particular issue and overall build better rapport.

      Disadvantages of in-house are that payroll will be more expensive and if that person isn't performing, it will be more difficult to cut ties than it would be with a consultant.

      Advantages of consultant are the consultant's ability to bring a bigger picture to the table and help the team zoom out to better identify the biggest opportunities. Also, if the consultant has other clients, it's possible to share learnings between them and replicate strategies (depending on if the clients are in the same industry). Because the consultant might not have as much intel about the product, it's easy to play devil's advocate and help the team break down the product to something others that don't live and breathe the product will understand.

      Disadvantages of consultant are that the intuition for the product likely isn't as strong and constant questioning will be the norm for a good consultant. At times it can be rather tedious to have to re-explain shifts in planning.

      I think overall the best consultants and in-house growth people are aligned with the mission of the company. If they believe in the product, they're more likely to do whatever it takes to expand the value to more people.

  • AG

    Ashley Greene

    7 months ago #

    Hey Dani! So glad to see you here actually doing an AMA. Can't wait!

    What is the top lesson you've learned about driving sustainable growth for both: a) businesses; b) your personal life ?

    • DH

      Dani Hart

      6 months ago #

      Hi Ashley!

      Thanks for the great question. There are many nuances that go into sustainable growth, including a major one: nothing grows forever. Sure, fish grow until they die... but they do eventually die. Companies are no different. Nuances aside, I'm going to share what I think will be most important lesson for sustainable business growth in the 21st century.

      Sustainable business growth starts and ends with a "why" that's repeatable, ethical, and responsible. In an age where consumers have so much available education and purchasing power, companies not only need to focus on how to drive repeatable revenue to support the business, but they also need to ensure they're not producing negative social and environmental externalities, or phrased in business terms, long-term risks and future bad PR.

      Some companies do not have profits, people, and the planet embedded in their why OR business model and it's difficult to sustain growth when their customers become aware of business practices that don't have their current and future best interests at the core of the business, or when the business runs out of money because it didn't consider the one thing keeping its doors open.

    • DH

      Dani Hart

      6 months ago #

      The top lesson I learned about driving sustainable growth in my personal life is that growth REQUIRES rest and reflection. What I consider the inflection points of life... the taking one step back to make sure you're even on the right staircase to move forward.

      Sometimes when I mentor others, I ask about the last time the took time to relax and clear their head. Like REALLY clear their head. Most can't remember or share that they can't seem to "turn it off" and they feel guilty that they should be doing something else.

      We're now in an always on society and the art of relaxation takes work, but boy is it worth it. When we take some time to take a step back from the hustle, we can think clearly and get some much needed perspective on our why. A strong why will help us build resiliency when the times get tough. If we never take time to really understand this about ourselves, our growth will be short-sighted, burnout will be inevitable, and our lives will not be as fulfilling in the long-run.

  • PV

    Pascal van Steen

    7 months ago #

    Hey Dani,

    Excited that you're doing an AMA today! I got a couple of questions for you:

    What do you think was the toughest part of being head of growth at GrowthHackers?

    What made you decide to travel the world?

    Given your statements that you're now heavily focusing on personal development and well-being, where do you hope to be in 5 years? Do you want to leverage the skills you're developing now professionally as well?

    Hope to see you soon in Amsterdam 🚀

    • DH

      Dani Hart

      6 months ago #

      Hi Pascal! Thanks for the questions.

      Toughest part of being head of growth at GrowthHackers was figuring out the biggest area of opportunity within the business to focus on. With limited resources and infinite possibilities, we were constantly managing our FOMO. With the online community, annual conference, NorthStar software, blog, training courses, jobs board, Sean's book Hacking Growth, and at times consulting, every person coming to GrowthHackers had different expectations and needs to be met.

    • DH

      Dani Hart

      6 months ago #

      I decided I wanted to travel the world after I moved to California. About 2 years in, I said out loud to my boyfriend "Hey, let's quit our jobs and move to Europe." It was on a whim and totally not thought through, but then we took the next year and a half to begin mentally preparing for such an adventure.

      So, it was kind of on a whim, but as I started thinking more about it, I got excited to learn from other cultures and debunk what I've conceived in my mind as societal norms.

      My brother and have a joke that when one of us is feeling stressed, we ask "Societal pressures getting you down?" and the more that question came up, the more I questioned... why do I believe these pressures to be the norm and should I?

      Exploring other cultures is a way to see what other "societal pressures" do or do not look like so that I can help form the world I want to create for myself. Now that I've been in Greece for a few months studying the history, I've come to really resonate with Socrate's thinking.

      "True wisdom comes to each of us when we realize how little we understand about life, ourselves, and the world around us." -Socrates

    • DH

      Dani Hart

      6 months ago #

      In 5 years I see myself running or working within a business that's aligned with my values. While I'm using this time to travel, explore all possibilities, really understand my values, and discover my own "why" that will make me happy in the long-run, I also have a dream to one day open my own spa where I can help people learn how to relax. I could see it turning into a spa, yoga, co-working space. So all of my efforts more or less get me closer to this dream.

      Regardless of my plans, I absolutely plan to share what I learn along the way and help others (re)ignite their own paths of self-discovery and personal growth.

  • AG

    Ashley Greene

    7 months ago #

    Oh, and one more question. :)

    You’re obviously super successful Dani! And we can learn a lot from your successes, which we will with some of these great questions! But I find I learn a TON more when I screw something up rather than when I’m successful at it. Is there a story you can share about something you’ve failed at/screwed up/made a mistake on where you learned a big lesson?

    • DH

      Dani Hart

      6 months ago #

      Great question! Thanks for asking another :)

      Success doesn't come without LOTS of failure, that's for sure. Every failure is an opportunity to learn and put you on a path towards the things that do work.

      My favorite screw up was when I emailed a list of hundreds of thousands of people back in my nonprofit days with "Dear Sean" hardcoded in the greeting of an email. My boss' name at the time was Sean, ironically enough, and I had sent him tests of the email before we sent the donation campaign on behalf of the client.

      The client noticed when the email went out and I can still remember the gut-wrenching feeling in my stomach as I got the email in my inbox with "Dear Sean"

      Luckily, our team quickly brainstormed our options and we got approval to send out a follow-up email to the email recipients that read something like "While we like the name Sean, we know it's not for everyone. While we recognize our mistake and apologize deeply for the mixup, the matter at hand is more urgent than ever..." and asked for a donation.

      We got better results on that campaign than any previous campaign and luckily that eased the pain of messing up the email.

      Since then I've learned that I should always double check and triple check my work. And then have someone else check the work because I will probably still miss something. I also learned that mistakes happen, and as long as you can learn from them, everything will be okay. The world still spins and life goes on. :)

  • TW

    Troy Wendt

    7 months ago #

    Hi Dani!

    Very interested to hear your perspective on work-growth-life-yoga-running-travel balance! It can be so tricky to do meaningful and interesting work ... while practicing enough self care to keep a healthy and positive perspective.

    Looking forward!

    • DH

      Dani Hart

      6 months ago #

      Hi Troy,

      It's great to see a familiar face around the community. :)

      Working in growth has been awesome because it sort of forced me to adopt an always-learning mindset. For the past few years now, I've applied a growth process to my own life.

      Whenever starting growth, either for a company or yourself, discovery comes first. For company growth, this looks like understanding customers and the team, the two most important stakeholders in the business. It requires 1. understanding the value the product gives to customers (ie. North Star) and 2. how will the team continuously deliver and grow this value to customers.

      As for personal growth, self discovery forces us to turn inward, a task that many of us aren't taught. I did an exercise last year where I developed my own core values. This helped me understand my truths and created guidelines for my own decisions. I also studied my HEXACO results (a personality assessment) to understand what my strengths are and how I can best utilize them. For example, I'm a high on Sociability, which is a sub-dimension of the primary dimension Extraversion. Knowing this about myself I now ensure I have social activities scheduled on my calendar daily. I also now know that not everyone shares this trait, and that's okay. It's what makes me unique and how I thrive. That doesn't mean everyone else will thrive in the same way.

      After a lot of thought, my personal North Star is to live in balance. Balance with the earth and its resources, with my work-life, with my emotions, the right amount of stress and rest, and so on. Working towards balance, as unsexy as it may seem, makes me feel good and allows me to appreciate the ups and downs of life. While I love the stress of an exciting project, I know and appreciate rest, reflection and recovery that follows, allowing me to take the next, even more challenging, step in life. It's a goal I know I can work on for the rest of my life and is a mindset in itself. It won't be everyone's North Star, but it works for me.

      While self discovery is ongoing, applying a growth process to my life guides me in the right direction, towards my North Star. I constantly test new things in my life, create and replace habits that allow me to live more balanced, and learn what works for me.

      While self-help books can be great for learning new techniques, I've come to realize they are all really just teaching tools in a tool belt. I can acquire hundreds of tools that sit in my garage and never get around to building the house I want to live in. Building the house starts with knowing what I want, and using the tools to build my own foundation, walls, windows, etc. and repairing when necessary.

      Yoga, running, and travel are my "tools" that support balanced life. I create time for them because if I don't have my foundations, my house crumbles. With these I am my best self. I can serve my family, friends, community, and clients I work with even better when I create the space for myself first.

      At the end of the day, it's hard to help someone else if you haven't helped yourself first.

      Thanks for making me think about that one!

      Best,
      Dani

      3 Share
  • TC

    Tad Chef

    7 months ago #

    Hey Dani!

    Thank you for sharing your insights with us!

    I have two questions for you:

    how can we make the world a better place without starving while at it?

    Personally I have found it very hard. It seems you either end up working in business to grow profits or you work for non-profits and struggle while at it.

    Right now I found almost the perfect position to have both. I help people with self-controlled online publishing. It's more business than activism but it's empowering people speak out on their won terms.

    The second question is: why did you choose to focus on women or "gals" in your latest business venture?

    When I attended a gender studies seminar in the early nineties we were taught that there are basically two ways of dealing with gender. You can add gender to everything or subtract it from everything. I prefer the latter path.

    Do you think we need more focus on women in business? Are you really more a business gal that a business person?

    • DH

      Dani Hart

      6 months ago #

      Hey Tad!

      Great questions. Let's start with #1... how can we make the world a better place without starving while at it?

      I think it starts by breaking down limiting beliefs, shifting our mindset, and potentially our lifestyles.

      If we believe we can't find meaningful work and get paid while doing it, then we won't. However, if we take the time to look inward, figure out what's meaningful to ourselves, and then ask how can we use our talents for good, I think there's more opportunity now than ever. Specially for those frequenting this community. We all have knowledge and skills that mission-critical companies need help with.

      I also think it requires a mindset shift into what's necessary to live comfortably. In the past year I've cut my salary in half and feel more rich than I ever have. It required some lifestyle changes and letting go of previous spending habits.

      I spent the first 10 years of my career working my butt off, often working 2 jobs at once, in order to pay off my student debt, pay for my car, and a roof over my head. I also worked my butt off after I paid for those to have nice things. It wasn't until recently I realized the nice materialistic things I thought brought me happiness really mean little to my overall happiness. I'd rather exchange those "extras" for work I enjoy and other things in life I value.

      I value relationships, watching sunsets, being outside, running, doing yoga, reading, writing, cooking, and traveling. I spend less now on rent/flights living abroad in Europe than I did on rent in the states.

      I'm extremely fortunate to be where I am in life. I also believe it's possible for others to set out on their own paths of meaningful work. I think our future depends on it. You may also find this blog post I wrote interesting... it's got some recommendations at the bottom for how we can make the world a better place https://growthgal.com/hey-millennials-its-time-to-step-up/

    • DH

      Dani Hart

      6 months ago #

      2nd question...

      Funny enough, my LLC name is actually Galileo Growth. After my time at GrowthHackers I was doing a lot of reading and stumbled upon Galileo's perspective on scaling. Not only did Galileo push the limits of science during the scientific revolution, he also questioned why we have no giants in the world. He was the first person to think about such a question carefully. He developed a way of thinking about the sizes of objects in a systematic way that is called scaling. With my new endeavor, I wanted to systematically approach the way companies were scaling. Do they have the necessary inputs and foundations to make scaling possible? My perspective related deeply to Galileo's and so the name was born.

      Then when I was telling my mom about Galileo Growth, she had a hard time repeating back Galileo. My mom is a computer programmer and a well educated person, but this was hard for her. So, I realized getting everyone to spell Galileo would be a challenge and therefore decided to move away from using galileogrowth as a domain name.

      I've branded myself as Growth Gal because it's catchy and easy to spell. I'm not sure Growth Person would have the same ring. And yes, I am a woman in growth and proud of that.

      Now, I won't shy away from the gender part of the question, because I do think now is a really unique time in history for women, and I'm proud to be a part of it.

      I've been advocating for women to reach for their goals and dreams since University, when I started a campus Women in Leadership organization. Women have inherit struggles they need to overcome to be successful in leadership. We have mensuration, child-birth, occasional assault, and oppressive social norms that are really hard to understand until they're experienced. I'm extremely fortunate. I grew up with brothers that taught me early not to put up with bull $#!& and a badass working single mom that believed in me, supported me, and taught me my gender doesn't make a difference for what's possible.

      Unfortunately, not all women have that experience to draw from and need support to feel as confident as their male counterpart. We've come SO FAR from the times where women weren't allowed to vote or speak out of turn, but we still have work to do. We still need more women in leadership roles to think long-term and put empathy at the front and center of business. Studies show that women are more empathetic than men. I believe this empathy is needed now more than ever, as we develop AI and grow social networks that impact mass numbers of people. If these technologies are developed by a uniform team with no diversity in thought, culture, and experience, we will create tech that's made for those uniform groups.

      So, if we were in a place where all groups were diverse and well represented, then I agree that subtracting gender would be appropriate. Until we're there, my opinion is that we should add it, talk about it, and take action on making sure all genders are represented equally.

      Why diversity is important from business results perspective: https://www.mckinsey.com/business-functions/organization/our-insights/delivering-through-diversity

      1 Share
  • SF

    Sergio Fuentealba

    7 months ago #

    Hello Dany, here a convinced of sustainability growth (Theory U, Teal and Inbound Organizations).

    I would like to know your opinion about the application of growth hacking in consumer products, for example: detergents, cookies, water, etc.. Does it have the same impact and relevance as a digital product? if so, should the consumer product be remarkable? or not necessarily, leaving any option for exponential growth of the product in the hands of the growth methodology?

    Thank you very much for your time, Namaste!

    • DH

      Dani Hart

      6 months ago #

      Hi Sergio,

      Thanks for sharing those resources! Super interesting to compare them and see the common themes behind them all. I'll be taking Harvard's new Sustainable Business Strategy course next month and look forward to sharing what I learn. :)

      Great question. Growth Hacking was created for digital products because the feedback loop for experiments is so quick and we can get feedback almost instantly. With that being said, every consumer product had metrics and feedback that can be tracked and improved. For example, sales by distribution channel and by region can indicate pockets of success to "double down" on. There's also now ways to monitor social sentiment of the product across all social channels to understand how customers are responding to the product and potential improvements. Larger organizations that have hundreds of brands (think Unilever, Johnson & Johnson, etc) are constantly evolving their products to meet the demands of the customer. At the end of the day, the customer has more buying power now than ever and brands will have to keep up with those demands to remain relevant and successful.

      Hope this helps!

      Namaste,
      Dani

  • DE

    Despina Exad

    7 months ago #

    Hey Dan :)

    Being a growth practitioner myself I have a hard time balancing my personal growth with my professional one. Burnout is my second name the last year. How do you manage to balance the two? Considering the lessons learned after so many years of hands on growth practice?

  • JC

    Jon Chang

    7 months ago #

    Love how you've been able to engage with so many growth marketers during your career. Do you see any shared personality traits and characteristics that successful growth marketers all share?

    • DH

      Dani Hart

      about 2 months ago #

      Great question, Jon!

      I don't think there's necessarily one right answer, but having self-awareness of the strengths of dominant traits is certainly important in having empathy for one's self and for others (including team & customers).

      That being said, if I was forming a team, I'd be looking for people that are high in openness and high in conscientiousness. High openness because the person is more appreciative and interested in new concepts, ideas, etc. With how fast things change, this person can be a huge asset to testing new ideas and looking out for what's next...there's no such thing as a bad idea with this person. High conscientiousness is important when things just need to get done and get done well. Their attention to detail and persistence leads them to be reliable and carry ideas to completion.

      I could make a case for most personality types if they are self-aware, but these two are ones that stick out above the rest.

  • SE

    Sophia Eng

    6 months ago #

    Hi Dani!

    I'm so excited to have you host an AMA and we can ask you questions on here now. :)

    It's been incredible watching you grow in your career, and I love watching your growth in this next chapter post GH.

    I have a few questions for you:

    1) What is the one biggest takeaway from your time at GH? I can only imagine how many takeaways you must have had working alongside Sean and the team, but I'm curious to know what the biggest takeaway from your time there.

    2) I absolutely love your next focus on working with GrowthGals, how did you decide to work with us gals, and what would you like to see in the future?

    3) As a working woman in growth balancing work/life/family/community/personal growth, what is your best advice on trying to balance it all and to prevent burnout so that I can continue serving others?

    Thanks in advance! :)

    Cheers!
    Sophia

  • JS

    Joe Segal-Create

    7 months ago #

    Hello Dani, I have a startup that shares tools we call Happy Cards which are designed to increase and share happiness, inner peace and kindness. What's a low cost way (Growth Hack) to get our Happy Cards seen by non profits that cater to vulnerable populations of people and to corporate wellness program managers? By vulnerable populations this could include people in addiction recovery, victims of bullying, and just people experiencing high levels of stress. Thank you for your time and consideration of my question.

    Joseph Segal

  • SS

    Saurabh Saha

    7 months ago #

    What role do you see consumer sciences namely behavioural psychology playing inside the growth vertical for a startup trying to achieve growth?

  • XK

    Xenofon Kontouris

    6 months ago #

    Hi Dani!

    I work in cryptocurrency marketing. One of the big problems with working with coin ecosystems is not being able to track how marketing affects coin prices.

    There is no real way to measure ROI and in most cases people just start spreading proposterus partnership rumors and work with market makers - which is unhealthy for the whole ecosystem.

    How would you and the Growth Hackers team go about marketing such clients? Do you have any other suggestions for tracking marketing ROI for cryptocurrencies?

    Thank you!

  • SW

    Sophia Wilson

    6 months ago #

    Thanks alot for sharing valuable information

  • JN

    Josh Nicholson

    about 2 months ago #

    Hey Dani,

    I would like to know that how you manage your tasks/projects to put your nail growth hacking? AND also tell what thing you like the most about that task management tool.

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