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Anne Fleshman is the Director of Marketing at Autopilot, the visual marketing software that makes it easy (and fun!) to create automated and personalized customer journeys. Named one of the top 10 fastest growing SaaS companies, Autopilot serves over 2,500 customers globally, including Microsoft, Crunchbase, Atlassian, and Lyft, and has raised $20.5M to date. 

As a demand generation leader with a background in early-stage B2B marketing, Anne joined Autopilot in pre-beta days to take the company from startup to scale up and can be credited for driving top of funnel acquisition to maintain 21% month-over-month revenue growth. Anne has executed 100+ events and webinars, increased website traffic 1400%, grown a community of 80,000+ customer journey marketers, spent $1M+ in advertising and demand generation programs, and launched countless automated journeys and integrated marketing campaigns, making her a linchpin to Autopilot’s success. 

Want to take Autopilot for a test flight? Get started with a free 30 day trial. 

Anne will be live on Sep 19 at 930 AM PT for one and a half hours during which she will answer as many questions as possible.

  • JK

    Jes Kirkwood

    11 days ago #

    What marketing channels are most effective for driving top-of-funnel demand? How do you measure that success?

    • AF

      Anne Fleshman

      5 days ago #

      Great question, Jes (and one of my favorite marketing subjects)! Y'all are smart here and probably don’t need the disclaimer, but I’ll say it anyway: What works for Autopilot may not work for you. So do your diligence and test different channels to see which is most effective for your audience. Once a channel has proven to be effective, optimize it and mine that baby for all it’s worth!

      1/ We always leave room for new experimental channels, but here are the core channels that have delivered consistently month-over-month:

      Organic (SEO content, WOM)
      Search engine marketing (Adwords)
      Facebook & Instagram advertising (especially retargeting and lookalike audiences)
      Events & Webinars
      Email (customer journeys like lead nurturing, newsletters, etc.)
      Business review sites (G2 Crowd, Getapp)

      5 Share
      • AF

        Anne Fleshman

        5 days ago #

        2/ While every campaign has it’s own success metrics, we typically measure channel conversion rates from session to free trial, and free trial to paying customer. Our monthly KPIs include volume of leads acquired by channel, quality of those leads (using Infer’s predictive lead scoring), and ultimately, revenue attribution.

  • AF

    Anne Fleshman

    5 days ago #

    Hi GrowthHackers! As we’re kicking things off, I wanted to express my gratitude for the opportunity to participate in this AMA. I’ve learned a tremendous amount from many of the smart people who have been featured here, and am excited to do my part in giving back. I’m humbled to see the questions rolling in—Happy to be an honest, open book today and share some of what I’ve learned. Let’s get crackin’!

  • MG

    Marc G

    6 days ago #

    What is your marketing stack at Autopilot?

    • AF

      Anne Fleshman

      5 days ago #

      Hi Marc, have you heard we’re in a Stackapocalypse? (I heard it from Dan McGaw, CEO at Effin Amazing: https://resources.autopilothq.com/recording/best-marketing-tools/)

      In 2011 we had 150+ martech tools and today there are over 6,000+ different tools to choose from.

      Taking a best-of-breed approach is part of the Autopilot DNA so we’re constantly trying new tools, paying special attention to those that play nice with our existing stack. Most tools don’t talk to each other so it’s critical to choose tools based on integrability.

      Here’s what’s in our stack in no particular order (OK, of course I’m naming Autopilot first)…
      Marketing automation: Autopilot
      CRM: Salesforce
      Analytics: Google Analytics, Heap, Hotjar, Quantcast
      Event tracking: Segment
      Data piping: Zapier
      Landing pages: Instapage
      CMS: Wordpress
      CRO: Optimizely
      Design collaboration: InVision
      Web conferencing: GoToWebinar (don’t love it, probably moving to Zoom)
      Predictive scoring: Infer
      Attribution: Bizible
      Social media management: Buffer, Edgar, Grum
      Tag manager: Google Tag Manager
      Gifs & screenshots: CloudApp
      UTM builder: Effin Amazing
      SEO: SEMrush, Majestic, Screaming Frog
      Surveys: Typeform, Google, SurveyMonkey
      NPS: Delighted
      Team communication: Slack, G Suite
      Task management: JIRA, Trello

      9 Share
  • AL

    Arsene Lavaux

    6 days ago #

    Bonjour Anne,

    I think we crossed path at the growth marketing conference in Atlanta last week but didn't get a chance to speak.
    Hopefully soon!

    What is your north star metric at Autopilot?
    How did you go about defining it?

    Merci!

    • AF

      Anne Fleshman

      5 days ago #

      Bonjour Arsene! The show in Atlanta was great, wasn’t it?

      Our north star metric on the marketing team is simple. Each month we have a target number of free trial signups we need to hit to meet our board plan. This number rolls up to our revenue goal which is based off our average win rate and average sales price.

      As we scale our sales team, we’re focusing more on a QUALIFIED trial sign up goal, which we define using our Infer model—it’s basically any lead that isn’t scored as a “D” (D’s have the lowest probability of converting to a paying customer.)

      ** Shameless free trial plug >> https://autopilothq.com/free-trial.html **

      • AA

        Anuj Adhiya

        5 days ago #

        Can you talk more about your lead scoring model? What characteristics to high quality leads share?

  • BS

    Brian Sun

    9 days ago #

    What marketing tools do you use everyday and why are they helpful?

    • AF

      Anne Fleshman

      5 days ago #

      Hey Brian, see my answer to the question about Autopilot’s tool stack, but ones I use everyday include:
      Autopilot: create and optimize automated journeys, track journey performance
      Salesforce: measure progress to goal using reports and dashboards, create campaigns
      Google Analytics: analyze web traffic and behavior
      Slack: communicate and collaborate with my team
      G Suite: email, docs, spreadsheets, presos
      CloudApp: super handy for creating gifs and annotating screenshots. Obsessed!

  • EC

    Eva Cabral

    6 days ago #

    Hi Anne, thanks for doing this AMA! Here's my questions:

    Back in the days when Autopilot was in pre-beta, how did you set up priorities when you joined as a Director of Marketing? What would you say the main activities were on your first 90 days on the job? Would you have done anything differently if you were to start again?

    Thanks in advance!

    • AF

      Anne Fleshman

      5 days ago #

      Hi Eva, I actually joined Autopilot as Demand Generation Manager and worked up to a Director level. I call the pre-beta days the “glory days” because we didn’t have targets to hit and weren’t actively selling a product. My first 90 days was all about setting the foundation for a successful launch, sustainable growth, and going back to the basics of marketing: Product, Price, Promotion, Place. This included...

      Brand and website redesign exercise: We worked with Josephmark, a design ventures firm based in Australia, to crystallize our market positioning, identify our core values, target personas, and differentiated brand. Highly recommend being part of a process like this if you can. It was so much fun, like architecting my dream marketing product and brand!

      Defining a growth strategy: From the get-go, we understood there was a massive gap in the market for accessible and affordable marketing automation that was easy to try and buy without ever talking to a salesperson. Transparent pricing that scales with your contact database, paired with an intuitive, visual product and frictionless purchasing experience meant that we were betting on a high volume of customers being able to self-educate themselves and make a purchasing decision online.

      Original research: The first major content piece I worked on was a research report where we surveyed 505 companies to discover where marketers are investing, winning, and failing. At the time, only 4% of companies had adopted marketing automation. We learned that 60% of marketers feel like they could be doing a better job, the main reasons for not adopting marketing automation are budget and skills, and those who use marketing automation generate 2x the leads and are 2x as effective! With honey this sweet, we were able to catch media attention, and ride the wave of this research for months, repurposing it as a downloadable report, blog post, nurture content, infographic, press initiative and social media campaign. Check it out: https://blog.autopilothq.com/2015-marketing-automation-performance-report/ (Boy, our design has come a long way!)

      Viral launch campaign: We set up a simple opt-in on our homepage to capture those who wanted to be notified of our launch, then created a “Tweet for early access” campaign. We worked with a PR agency to position ourselves in the space and land coverage in mainstream business publications like Forbes and VentureBeat.

      Automated journeys: Before launch, we set up an automated nurture journey to educate contacts not yet ready to buy, as well as a free trial journey meant to help users reach their “aha!” moment faster by activating them based on usage. For our product, we learned the key events that drastically improve activation rates include 1. Publishing your first journey, 2. Adding the tracking code. To compare, 9% of trial signups convert into paying customers, 21% convert after publishing a journey, and 35% convert if they complete both activation events. That’s a 4x increase!

      Would I have done anything differently? Maybe take a longer vacation beforehand!

      5 Share
      • JF

        John Fox

        5 days ago #

        Just downloaded your 2015 report. Love how you repurposed the content.

        Curious to know: did you send surveys to your own house list, or was it a rented list?

  • HA

    hammad anwer

    6 days ago #

    Hey Ann

    Can you share what you consider to be the best growth marketing resources for anyone that wants to study this field in detail?
    Also are there any specific growth marketing techniques that you think apply more to B2B than B2C?

    • AF

      Anne Fleshman

      5 days ago #

      Hi Hammad, thanks for asking!

      1/ I’ve read a lot of marketing content, but there’s only so much you can learn from a book. The #1 resource you can have is mentor who has direct, relevant experience and is fully committed to your growth. The other way you learn is by doing. Don’t let fear of failure hold you back (trust me, I’ve got my fair share of “oops emails”) and push that publish button. Learn from your mistakes, own your wins, and challenge yourself to be better every time.

      That being said, here’s a recommended list of resources and places you can learn cutting edge marketing:
      *Attend meetups, conferences, marketing events and network like crazy. You’re off to a good start participating on forums like this one! You’ll be surprised—the more generous you are and the more value you’re willing to share, the more you’ll receive in return.
      *Not just because I work here, but we’ve got great educational resources on customer journey marketing on the newly redesigned Autopilot blog (https://blog.autopilothq.com/) and Flight School marketing courses (https://flightschool.autopilothq.com/)
      *For PPC and CRO: KlientBoost Academy (https://klientboost.com/academy/), ConversionXL (https://conversionxl.com/institute/)
      *Reforge growth series: https://www.reforge.com/growth-series/
      *Forget the Funnel workshops hosted by Claire Suellentrop and Georgiana Laudi: http://www.forgetthefunnel.com/workshops/

      There’s lots more!

      2 Share
      • AF

        Anne Fleshman

        5 days ago #

        2/ General principles are the same between B2B and B2C. The key is understanding the customer journey for your particular audience—when, where, and how you should engage. Because when you boil it down, it’s all human to human anyway. People get frustrated by generic, interruptive marketing. They are more than just what they do online, yet marketers today still treat people like spreadsheets. Today’s consumers care about building trusted, authentic relationships while being able to connect with their preferred brand at any time, from anywhere. Marketers need to ditch the cookie-cutter and make use of the personal data consumers are generously willing to give up to reward them with relevant, personalized experiences. Our CEO, Mike Sharkey, says it best, “The best kind of marketing is so tailored to each customer that it doesn’t feel like marketing at all.”

        B2C tends to have shorter sales cycles while B2B has longer sales cycles. B2B can also be more complex, but bring in higher value customers. B2B also lends itself well to high-touch channels like field marketing and events, but many of the same channels that work for B2B business will work for B2C, e.g. SEO, SEM, Facebook, affiliate and referral programs, etc. More differences here: https://blog.autopilothq.com/differences-between-b2b-and-b2c-marketers/

        3 Share
  • JF

    John Fox

    6 days ago #

    Looking forward to your AMA, Ann. Can you talk about pricing strategy as AP matured from beta to today? If you had to do it all over again, would you change anything about the beta pricing plans?

    I'm also curious, what's been your key success factor in working with the AP sales team?

    • AF

      Anne Fleshman

      5 days ago #

      Hi John, thanks for the two-parter.

      1/ We designed our pricing model around number of contacts, which scales depending on the size of your business. Atlassian and Microsoft have more contacts than a cleaning services company, but both have pricing plans that work for them. We started with a low friction cost-of-entry at $5/month for 500 contacts with the expectation that customers would “land and expand” quickly as they grew their contact database in the first three months of using the product. By offering a fully functioning 30 day free trial and monthly or annual subscription pricing that could be cancelled at any time, we saw huge growth in customer numbers in the first 9 months.

      The problem was our system wasn’t capitalized to be efficient for those customers. We had support constraints and were spending too many resources helping low paying customers which left higher paying customers without the help they needed to be successful.

      So we removed the $5 plan and introduced two plans—Base and Business—still priced based on the number contacts in your marketing database. The Business plan catered to more sophisticated users and gave access to more personalization features like API access, CRM integration, A/B testing, and in-app journey reviews.

      We over-communicated this change over the course of a month, sending weekly emails and Headsup messages. We also grandfathered pricing indefinitely. The month of our pricing change led to a huge revenue spike since anyone who was considering purchasing converted to lock in old pricing. Afterwards, we started seeing higher ASPs, more satisfied customers and less churn.

      3 Share
  • GH

    Glen Harper

    5 days ago #

    Thank you for joining us today, Anne.
    I'm curious as to why the demo for your product (a link for which is buried under the "Tour" menu) is not the primary CTA vs the free trial?
    Would the demo not get people to their aha moment quicker?
    And if its buried in that menu, why offer it at all?

    • AF

      Anne Fleshman

      5 days ago #

      Hi Glen,

      Thanks for the question. The reason the demo is “buried” is because we’ve embraced a try before you buy self-service model. Our goal is to create such a frictionless experience that a person can understand the value of the software, easily sign up for a trial, experience its value in our onboarding process, and become a paying customer all without ever talking to a salesperson.

      On a business-y note, offering one-on-one demos is expensive to operate and hard to scale because it requires more and more people. If you’re charging $20/mo for a plan but you have to pay for a sales rep to run the demos and you only have a lifetime value of $200, your business isn’t viable. To solve this problem, at Autopilot leads who cross a certain contact size threshold receive an invitation to a personal demo (one-to-one approach) and smaller accounts are invited to a group demo (one-to-many approach).

      The website menu isn’t the only way users access the demo. We send invitations to them at strategic times throughout the customer journey, like after a lead has engaged with our content. Our motto is “send the right message to the right person at the right time.” That way, you increase your chances that the lead will take action.

      TL’DR: Our primary call-to-action is Free Trial. We want people to get into the product as quickly as possible and self-learn the value, but do offer a Demo Request for those who prefer to work with a salesperson.

      2 Share
  • DH

    Dani Hart

    5 days ago #

    So excited to have you on, Anne!
    What is your biggest growth challenge right now and how are you tackling it?
    Is this challenge different from what it was last year?

  • AF

    Anne Fleshman

    5 days ago #

    Lots of questions are still left unanswered, but I've got to jet for now. Thank you all for all the incredibly thoughtful questions and fun morning! I'll try follow up with those that are hanging in the coming days.

    If you want to get in touch, feel free to email me at anne@autopilothq.com. Over and out!

    • AA

      Anuj Adhiya

      5 days ago #

      Really appreciate you spending this time with us Anne - you left a lot of gold for us here! 🙌

  • AS

    Ajit Singh

    6 days ago #

    Hey Anne,
    Thanks for doing this.

    Could you share some demand generation tips for an enterprise product trying to tap mid-market consumer businesses?

    Best

    • AF

      Anne Fleshman

      5 days ago #

      Hi Ajit,

      At Autopilot, we have the opportunity to address a large horizontal market. A lot of our of our audience has overlapping goals and are trying to solve the same problems regardless if they are a one person operation or a big multi-person marketing department.

      While we are very focused on empowering the SMB and develop content and materials to support those users specifically, the byproduct of a large horizontal market is access to larger potential customers who sign up. We’ve created what we call “swim lanes” to route larger companies with more complex use cases directly to a salesperson, while automating a low-touch sales process for the majority of the companies who sign up. Enterprises have more sophisticated needs. They have more moving parts, more people involved, and need dependability. Make sure you have a staff and scalable process to support them effectively.

      If you are an enterprise product trying to reach mid-market, I’d suggest creating content for each stage of the buying process specifically for that audience. Address the questions they are already asking throughout the customer journey (awareness, consideration, purchase, loyalty, advocacy), use their language, and publish case studies that demonstrate you have an answer to their needs.

      In terms of paid channels, LinkedIn released the capability to run account-based marketing campaigns if you have a target list of companies you want to convert. This is something I haven’t tried personally, but have heard good things from those who have. Good luck!

      2 Share
  • ND

    Nichole Elizabeth DeMeré

    6 days ago #

    Hi Anne! I'd love to know about the community that you've grown to have over 80,000+ customer journey marketers. What's the URL and how did you grow it? What are some of your future plans for it? Thank you!

    • AF

      Anne Fleshman

      5 days ago #

      Hi Nichole, our community is built up of like-minded people who take a journey-centric approach to their marketing and aren’t afraid of doing things creatively to grow fast. The 80k consists of those we’ve built relationships over past two and some years who are highly engaged with our content and want to be involved in events. There are various audiences included in this segment, like workshop and webinar attendees, product trialists, and subscribers.

      I have a vision to create an actual community site (like GrowthHackers), where participants can connect more frequently and socialize over the awesome journeys they’ve automated and are seeing results with. It’s probably a long way away, but a girl can dream!

      In the meantime, I send a monthly roundup to this list where I share the latest marketing trends, tactics, and upcoming events. We call it “Just Landed”—a little play on our aviation theme at Autopilot. If you’re interested in joining, here’s the URL to subscribe: http://www2.autopilothq.com/autopilot-community-subscribe

  • NL

    Neyson Lins de Jesus

    5 days ago #

    Hi, Anne.

    What is your secret to getting senior-level/VPs/CXO B2B leads of Enterprises? Which networks have you tried that were most beneficial for this target and how do you leverage it?

    Thanks,

  • AA

    Anuj Adhiya

    5 days ago #

    Hey Anne - so cool to finally have you on!

    I'd love to learn more about the events you'll put on beyond webinars.
    Are these meetups, workshops, conferences?
    Whatever the case, what are the top 3 things you've learned about increasing attendance to these events?
    If any of these events are paid, how have you managed to increase the amount of paying attendees and/or how much they pay (if applicable)?

  • JP

    John Phamvan

    5 days ago #

    Hi Anne,
    Someone has already asked about what is in your marketing stack.
    I'd like to extend that to what is in you experimentation & analytics right now?
    Where does your data live?
    Also, what has/have been the most recent one(s) you'll have added to your toolset - and why?

  • TN

    Tri Nguyen

    5 days ago #

    Hey Anne
    Can you talk more about why you'll have pricing the way you'll currently do (ie flexible based on contacts) vs fixed tiers?
    Any other tests/experiments around pricing you'll have tried that you're willing to share?

  • MD

    Mark Anthony de Jesus

    5 days ago #

    Hi Anne
    I'm only asking this Q because I noticed its absence on your site - that of a live chat widget of some sort.
    Why don't you'll have one?

    • AF

      Anne Fleshman

      5 days ago #

      Hi Mark,

      We do have one! We use our own tool, Headsup, to engage in unique ways with known and anonymous website visitors. Check it out: https://autopilothq.com/headsup.html

      Headsup was built for marketers who don’t the resources or staff to handle 24/7 live chat support. Not only is it a personalized, real-time engagement and lead gen channel, you can also:
      * Nudge users along their buying journey with a call to action -- for example, sign up for a webinar, request a demo, or view a technical support article
      *Enable visitors to subscribe, for example, to your blog, customer loyalty program, or newsletters
      *Ask consumers to reply back with feedback, allowing you to complete a quick, single question survey and start a conversation

      Headsup enables marketers to choose who sees each message and which pages to display the message on, which is why you may not see it on our site. For example, people who visit our blog are shown a prompt to subscribe for updates, while people who visit our pricing page are invited to start a conversation with a product specialist.

      Unlike most live chat tools, you don’t have to respond right away. Messages are either sent to your email or Slack - it’s your choice. Because notifications come from the lead's email address, you can continue the conversation simply by replying to their email. It’s a great way to connect with website visitors while capturing new leads.

      You can set it up it 10 minutes. Users who do see immediate impact. For example, Crunchbase saw lead volume increase 20%.

      • JF

        John Fox

        5 days ago #

        Wasn't aware of Headsup. Will check it out.

      • MD

        Mark Anthony de Jesus

        5 days ago #

        Nice - will check that out for sure.
        And I'll also elaborate on my Q.
        Why did I not see a Headsup widget on the site (or did I just miss it)?
        If its hidden in some way - under what conditions would it have shown up to me?

  • DO

    Danielle Olivas

    5 days ago #

    Hi Anne! So many Qs for you...

    a. Talk more about how the kinds of marketing you used to do in the pre-beta days changed as you strove to get to PM fit and then after (and I know this could be a long answer)

    b. You've experienced all the funding rounds so far - what have you learned about fundraising that you wish you knew before the company got involved in each of those rounds (you can answer in general or specifically about any round/s)

    c. How are you keeping your team aligned with what the north star metric/current marketing/growth objectives of the company are? What processes/tools have been most helpful?

  • RK

    Rohit krishnan

    9 days ago #

    Hey Anne, do you have a referral model set up for your product? If so, can you give an outline of how you went about planning and building it?

  • RB

    Rodrigo Borowski Greco

    6 days ago #

    Hello Anne, I'm implementing content marketing tests (blogging, newsletter with product tips and company announcements, and webinars).
    Since the company is in early stage and has weak SEO, not a lot of people know us. How can I measure my tests effectively if I can't reach out to a lot of people, or lets say I can only reach out to our current contacts, which is about 200 only? i.e. lets say I write 4 blogs, once a week for a 1 month test period. If I can't reach out to people, I will never know if this is a promising channel or not.

    Thank you!!!

    • AF

      Anne Fleshman

      5 days ago #

      Hi Rodrigo,

      One of the things we say around the office is that “content marketing is the long game.” This is because creating quality content takes time, effort, and resources, then you have to promote the content to the right people, and finally measure your efforts to see what worked and what didn’t. With that said, there’s still effective tests you can run early on.

      For your particular situation, make finding “content-market fit” (coined by Susan Su, formerly of 500 Startups and now Reforge) your overarching goal.

      Practically, start by defining the content topics you want to own and the reason *why* you want that topic would be valuable for your business. At Autopilot, the customer journey, lead nurturing, and multi-channel marketing are a few topics we’re going after because all of those directly relate to our product. People wanting to learn about those topics would gain value from our software.

      Second, do keyword research using SEMrush or KWfinder (for a cheaper option) to find the top five keywords around that topic. Use Clearscope to help you create algorithmically relevant content and partner with a subject matter expert to make sure the quality is top-notch.

      From there, create a five article series you can repurpose into an email course or downloadable ebook, then rapidly test whether this content brings in qualified leads by targeting the most probable buyers for your product using paid Facebook ads. You don’t have to spend a lot of money here. Dennis Yu, insists you only need $1 a day, the point is to use paid experiments to reach a wider audience and validate your assumptions.

      This process will help you gain some early traction, and more importantly, gain insight into whether you achieve content-market fit.

      One of my teammates recently did a workshop on content strategy that you may find valuable. Check it out: www.forgetthefunnel.com/workshops/content-biz-strategy-replay/

      2 Share
  • JF

    Javier Feldman

    5 days ago #

    Hola, Anne.
    You've been asked about pricing experiments already.
    Is there any other test that you can talk about (at Autopilot or elsewhere) that was either a big win or led to some big insights?

    • AF

      Anne Fleshman

      5 days ago #

      Hi Javier,

      Earlier this year, Facebook announced it would allow brands to create ads with GIFs—and we jumped at the opportunity.

      Autopilot is *visual* marketing software for automating your customer journeys. Our flexible and intuitive canvas makes creating remarkable customer experiences fun for the user. It's what sets us apart in the hyper-competitive marketing automation space. So why not give potential buyers a sneak peek at our winning user experience with a mesmerizing gif?

      Here’s the ad we ran with: https://cl.ly/1h1a2U0b3H1s

      Last quarter, not only did this ad drive the highest volume of free trial signups, it outperformed our average cost per lead by 37%.

      We’ve also run a number of newsletter experiments. We’ve detailed some of the results here: https://blog.autopilothq.com/newsletter-experiments/

      2 Share
  • VM

    Vijay Mandeep

    5 days ago #

    Hi Anne,

    Glad to be part of this Q & A session. Wanted to ask this question:

    Has marketing for SaaS companies seen a dead end in terms of organic ways?

    • AF

      Anne Fleshman

      5 days ago #

      Hi Vijay,

      Interesting question. In my experience, organic growth is alive and well for these reasons:

      1. People still search on Google to find SaaS solutions for their business.
      Not only that, they begin searching about the topic related to the SaaS product before ever looking for a solution. “What is marketing automation” and “marketing automation benefits” and “how to choose marketing automation software” are natural questions people ask on Google. Showing up for these search queries leads to organic growth for us as a marketing automation company

      2. People still refer their friends to great products.
      Net Promoter Score is the metric based on the question “How likely are you to recommend ________ to a friend?” (learn more here: https://blog.autopilothq.com/net-promoter-score/). One of the foundations of NPS is that there are “Promoters” who share products/services with their friends. In other words, if your SaaS product provides a great experience and gives companies a healthy ROI, referrals would be a natural output of your efforts—also known as organic growth.

      3. Co-marketing has worked for us.
      Over the past few years at Autopilot, we’ve partnered with companies like Segment, Instapage, and Slack to run co-marketing campaigns that have led to organic growth. The premise is that getting in front of a new audience grows your own audience. Simple.

      Organic growth isn’t dead. It’s just about about doing it right, and putting in the upfront work that’s too easy to run away from when you have money to throw at the problem! Resist the temptation and focus on ways you can 10x the returns of your organic growth strategy. Zapier is a classic example of a company who is nailing it. They created their Zapbook full of landing pages for every combination of app-to-app that you could possibly connect. With 800+ apps in their ecosystem, they’ve managed to rank highly for keywords like “shopify & slack” or “integrate pipedrive and autopilot” or “groove and JIRA.” It’s brilliant.

      Want more? Here’s how Weebly grew organically: https://blog.autopilothq.com/unlock-organic-growth/

      4 Share
      • VM

        Vijay Mandeep

        4 days ago #

        Thank You, Anne! These are some good reasons. However, I would like to explore on the organic marketing for SaaS companies on social channels. What do you think is the right way to organically grow your presence?

  • AS

    Abe Seksek

    5 days ago #

    Hey Anne,
    Love the software we start using it a couple of weeks ago and we are learning from it everyday!

    Could you share some tips for a traditional offline product trying to tap into consumer businesses?

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