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Ward van Gasteren is one of the first certified growth hackers in Europe and a former TEDx speaker. He has hands-on experience as a freelance Growth Hacking Consultant working for 70+ clients, from the fastest growing scale-ups (TikTok, Catawiki & StartupBootcamp) to the biggest Fortune 500 corporates (Cisco, Miele & KPMG).

You might also know him from his blog, GrowWithWard.com, one of the biggest growth hacking blogs with more than 10k readers every month. Soon he’ll also launch his first book for upcoming growth hacking consultants called ‘Growing Happy Clients’.

Last month, he also launched his Full Beginners Course to Growth Hacking here at GrowthHackers University. Why is he the perfect instructor for this course? He is focused on making growth hacking understandable for everybody, has hosted 100+ workshops and is nowadays focused on coaching growth hackers get better on-the-job, which makes him the perfect teacher to host our Ultimate Beginners Course to Growth Hacking, in collaboration with GrowthHackers University.

During this AMA, you can ask him anything about:

  • Working as a freelance growth hacker / growth consultant
  • Long-term growth strategies
  • How he built his blog GrowWithWard.com
  • Learning the latest growth hacking tactics
  • His new growth hacking course on how to become a Growth Hacker

You can connect with him on his LinkedIn

  • GC

    Gianluca Cinquepalmi

    16 days ago #

    What are some best practices to identify the NSM

    • WV

      Ward van Gasteren

      6 days ago #

      Hi Gianluca, great to see you here! 👋

      Some options are:
      1. Ask users what their most joyful moment was when using the product ---> That's the purpose of your business and thus you should create more of those. Think of Quora's NSM of 'Number of Questions Answered', which shows people's moment of happiness.

      1 Share
    • WV

      Ward van Gasteren

      6 days ago #

      2. Ask people before they start using, what they're trying to achieve with the product. This way they can tell you what their overall goal is, and it's your purpose to fulfill that need. Think of Amazon's NSM 'Number of Purchases', which isn't very pretty, but does show that that's what people came to do.

    • WV

      Ward van Gasteren

      6 days ago #

      3. Discuss with your founding team or look back at when you started, to see what the motivation was for you to start the business. Very often it's the itch that you tried to solve for people, that will stay your company's North Star for a longer period of time. Think of AirBnB's NSM of 'Number of Nights Booked', which shows the itch of not being able to find a place to sleep when traveling.

    • WV

      Ward van Gasteren

      6 days ago #

      4. Lastly, if consumption of content is the most important or when you’re running a platform and people’s goals can be completely different from each other, your most ideal NSM is probably Daily/Weekly/Monthly Active Users (DAU/WAU/MAU), like Facebook, LinkedIn and Slack have.

  • FL

    Fay Lo

    6 days ago #

    Hi Ward!

    First of all a big congrats on the release of your book Growing Happy Clients! Two questions regarding the book:
    1. Can you highlight some of the biggest learnings that are mentioned in the book?
    2. Do you have an example of a project or situation that made you question your work as a growth consultant, and which chapter of the book you would've like to give yourself then to have handled the situation differently?

    • WV

      Ward van Gasteren

      6 days ago #

      Hi Fay - 🎉 Yes, the book is launched today indeed & it's so exciting to see this many people enthusiastic! For those who are interested: https://www.amazon.com/Growing-Happy-Clients-experiences-corporates/dp/B08NF36GG5/ 🎉

      3 Share
    • WV

      Ward van Gasteren

      6 days ago #

      1. Most interesting insights from the book: If I look at what topics come up the most when I’m talking to other growth hackers, I think that the most interesting chapters will be about managing the interaction with clients. In the book, Daphne and I have translated common personality colors into client colors. Ever since we made that translation, I notice it all the time with clients, and it helps me so much to have the answer on paper on what I should and shouldn’t do with a client.

      1 Share
    • WV

      Ward van Gasteren

      6 days ago #

      We even took it a step further and create some worksheets and cheatsheets to make the book actionable, so we even created some worksheets 💪 For this insight we created our own Client Colour Cheatsheet: https://growwithward.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/GHC-Client-Colour-Cheatsheet.jpg. It’s more of a reminder, because we just couldn’t copy-paste all of the context from ±20 pages of how you should work with different clients.

    • WV

      Ward van Gasteren

      6 days ago #

      2. A moment I went down: Well, when I just started as a freelance growth hacker, I had one client that taught me to Be Bold (which is now one of the Five Core Principles for Exceptional Growth Consultants in the book). At that time, I had a lot more struggles with my ‘Imposter Syndrome’ and I felt like my growth-knowledge was common to everybody. For that reason, I would often keep my mouth shut when we were discussing ideas and I would say to myself, that they had made the same considerations as I did - thus my ideas were possibly not good enough. And I wasn’t sure enough about my skills yet, so even though I thought that their idea was stupid, I wouldn’t say it. When the results went south, I just realized that I had seen that coming all along 😳 and when I brought it up after all, my client was shook and asked me why I didn’t bring that up earlier. Looking back, I think that that is the moment that I lost my Imposter Syndrome and started to believe that my knowledge was of a decent standard and that people were also paying me to speak up about exactly those things. This Imposter Syndrome was for me one of the motivators to write the book, because I know that more people struggle with this.

      1 Share
  • YS

    Yara Sting

    6 days ago #

    Hi Ward, love your content!
    I was wondering what's the difference between your course and other courses at GH University?

    Thankyou!

    • WV

      Ward van Gasteren

      6 days ago #

      Thanks, Yara, for the question! The aim of my beginner's growth hacking course is to get you ready to start as a growth hacker. It really teaches everything that you would need to know to be considered by a company for a job as a junior growth hacker or growth hacking trainee. To me, this was the reason for creating the course, because I saw that most of the other courses here at GrowthHackers University were more focused on growth hackers who are already in the trenches for a while.

      • WV

        Ward van Gasteren

        6 days ago #

        Next to GH University, you also have other courses that take you through all of the basics, but those often cost >$1000, so I wanted to create something that was ideal for students/junior growth hackers, or for growth hackers who want to take a step again and have a good look at the bigger picture, without breaking the bank.

  • AS

    Alexandru Stoica

    15 days ago #

    Hello, Ward

    Such a coincidence that few days ago I landed on your site and looked for your articles like "30 saas for GW" and the one with book recommandtions.
    I wanna ask you a question regarding a SaaS startup in Martech that adress SMBs: from you experience where you see a blue ocean still in this quadrant?
    I m a technical founder and I look for opportunities!

    Thanks,

    • WV

      Ward van Gasteren

      6 days ago #

      Interesting case Alexandru! 🤔

      I see that most SaaS businesses are creating something based on their knowledge, while I think that most SMB struggle with MarTech because it is solving problems from a SaaS perspective, while their knowledge is so basic, that they don’t know how to navigate through Facebook ads/Shopify/Analytics/etc. So I believe that SMB market needs super simple products that really take them by the hand.

      2 Share
    • WV

      Ward van Gasteren

      6 days ago #

      Next to that, I think Google Analytics is one of the basic tools that is showing up a lot for SMB, but isn’t really made for SMB, but that’s because there is no easier alternative. Put yourself in the shoes of an SMB owner: They don’t think in those metrics (e.g. bounce rate), in those categories (“Behaviour”?) or even in those terms (“Conversions”>Sales). And the best thing: that ocean is only getting blue-er, thanks to GA4, which is so complex that I even hear a lot of marketers not understanding this. And if rebuilding is too hard, you could consider to just create a chrome extension that gives people an overlay on top of GA, which rearranges the metrics, uses different terms and helps to educate people throughout the dashboard.

      2 Share
  • AC

    Alexandre Contador

    12 days ago #

    Huge fan of your work Ward! I would like to know which tools do you use to keep track of your progress for experimentation and other growth hacking actions?
    Stay sharp 😁

    • WV

      Ward van Gasteren

      6 days ago #

      Hi Alexandre - Cool to see you here as well!

      I have created a very extensive spreadsheet to keep track of experiments and steps-forward (which is hard, because my blue-/organized-side is not my strongest side), and I aim to send a weekly update email to my client’s stakeholders (even if they don’t ask for it or don’t read it). See example here (under the ‘R’ of the FORWARD-method): https://growwithward.com/forward-methodology/#revolution

      I would still love to try GH’s Experiments sometime 😏 *hint-hint to the moderators here*

      P.s. Keep it up with your newsletter! I’m reading it every time 👀

      1 Share
  • BV

    Bruno Velázquez

    12 days ago #

    Hey Ward!

    Could you share some tips/ideas/hacks for Ed-Tech? I sell courses and would love to get some fresh ideas from a pro like you.

    Cheers,
    Bruno

    • WV

      Ward van Gasteren

      6 days ago #

      Hola Bruno! What I feel like is missing most often on the course sites is that they are not able to really show you what the inside of the course will feel like (example videos/screenshot of learning environment), and that there are few personal reviews from people, which both turn buying a course into a big leap of faith.

      Next to that I really believe in giving a lot of value away for free, to make the buying of the course a no-brainer decision, knowing that that authority gives good content. Most effective channels are webinars and events (🙄) for direct conversions, or YouTube for more top-of-the-funnel, because when people get a face with a company it makes it so much more trustworthy!

      1 Share
  • JS

    Julia Stowell

    9 days ago #

    Hello! Do you have industry benchmarks for key SaaS metrics? Free trial sign up, conversion to paid, churn, etc?

    • WV

      Ward van Gasteren

      6 days ago #

      Hi Julia! Nice to see you here :)

      The best place I know for SaaS benchmarks is OpenView with their latest benchmark reports: https://openviewpartners.com/productbenchmarks/

      I believe they mention all, except your churn rate. In my experience, this is what churn rates for a SaaS business should look like in general.

      >20% = bad, and you're probably having a Product/Market-Fit problem
      10-20% = bad, but you could build a business on it
      5-10% = average
      3-5% = good
      <3% = amazing!

      If I look at Iotum I think that you're more focused on corporate-level clients, which churn way less normally. That's because they take decisions way slower if they want to cut something when they've already invested in it. So for that reason, you could cut those churn rate benchmarks almost in half to make them more applicable to your case 🙂

  • TS

    Thomas Strosse

    9 days ago #

    Growth hacking is traditionally talked about a lot in the SaaS and Lead-Gen space. But there are fewer mentions about eCommerce companies and the application of growth hacking. How would you go about to implement growth hacking in a medium-sized eCommerce store without losing sight and trying a million and one things at the same time.

    • WV

      Ward van Gasteren

      6 days ago #

      Hi Thomas! I think Growth Hacking could be applied in all fields. I've personally worked for a lot of different companies, from the biggest fertilizer company in Europe, but also for a teacher employment agency. The principles are always applicable: 1) Stay away from day-to-day tasks and dedicate time/energy to growth. 2) Make decisions based on data. 3) Keep trying to improve (ideally with quick experiments) the weakest point/your bottleneck.

      In Ecommerce, you can also focus on data to find your business' toughest bottleneck, and try to understand why people drop-off there. Then come up with the best possible solutions for that problem, and start with the one with the highest potential + lowest investment.

      If you focus on that bottleneck, you shouldn't run into the problem of losing sight, and if you take a bit of time to write the possible solutions down to prioritize them, you also shouldn't be doing a million things at once.

      Please let me know more about your case and what problems you're trying to tackle and I would love to brainstorm ideas right here and now! 🧠

  • O#

    Omar Aloyoun #JO

    8 days ago #

    What do you define “Organic Growth“?

    • WV

      Ward van Gasteren

      6 days ago #

      Organic growth is everything you didn't have to pay for and are not fully controlling, like email marketing, where you send an email and get on back, but instead, it grows by itself in directions that you might not have expected.

      I think SEO and an Owned Community are the most effective examples of organic growth.
      SEO, because: More Content > More Traffic > More Links > More Traffic, which can be insane!
      And Owned Community, because: More People > More Interaction > More Value > More Conversation > More People > More Interaction, which just goes on-and-on. If you can build something like that it can be amazing.

      Currently, I'm working on a project where we're combining the two: A community that discusses topics that everybody cares about, which also makes it great for SEO content. A true Growth Loop!

  • HG

    harin girn

    7 days ago #

    Hi Ward
    Been following your work for a while. What are your the top 3 strategies to get started in GH.

    • WV

      Ward van Gasteren

      6 days ago #

      Hi Harin 👋

      These are some of the best opening tactics that I think are always good starters, because they work almost all the time, but at the same time cost little effort and have a relatively low difficulty.

      1. Retargeting. People who have visited your site have had some interest in your product/services. Therefore, they're per definition more likely to buy than any random audience you can find. So if you don't do this already, give it a try. Even if you just put $5-20 in it, you can already see the potential impact. The reason why it's so effective is that often the timing just isn't right for people: maybe they're on the bus, they almost have to go into a meeting, or they have a deadline to pursue. For any of those reasons, they might not convert at that moment, but a later moment might have a better timing :)

      • WV

        Ward van Gasteren

        6 days ago #

        2. Remove unnecessary things. Everything that doesn't add value to the customer's journey, is only distracting or frustrating them: jargon-words that they don't understand, unnecessary form fields/checkout steps, big loads of text that say very little, etc. The more you can take out of their way, the easier people will flow through your funnel.

      • WV

        Ward van Gasteren

        6 days ago #

        3. Use OPN's (Other People's Networks). Building a big reach is super difficult and takes a lot of effort & time. For many startups, it's the main reason for failure, because they simply didn't have the resources left to continue building their reach.

        Instead, build upon the networks that other people already built. Get active in already existing Facebook Groups. Do a partnership with another company. Co-organize events to instantly reach the other company's audience. I'm not saying you shouldn't build anything for yourself, but if you want to go fast...

  • QA

    Q&A AMA

    7 days ago #

    Question from Jonathan Nimrodi

    Can you perform genuine Growth Marketing as a freelancer?

    • WV

      Ward van Gasteren

      5 days ago #

      Yes, Jonathan, you absolutely can!

      I do understand where you're coming from: as a freelancer, it's harder to set up long-term growth improvements, because you probably get fired for a lack of results if it takes too long. But, on the other hand, if you don't do long-term strategies and instead go for quick-wins, your arsenal will dry up, because you have to bring in new spikes every week, because you're not building assets.

      That's why (as a freelancer) you have to do two things really well: Know how to manage your client's expectations (biggest results take the longest), and know how to start with killing bottlenecks, followed by quick wins and start on time with your long-term growth loops, which bring the real results.

      If you want to read more about it, Daphne Tideman and I spend several chapters on these topics in 'Growing Happy Clients' (https://amzn.to/3pKb59y). Or maybe you like this LinkedIn post of mine, from a while back: https://www.linkedin.com/posts/wardvangasteren_how-not-to-grow-a-business-activity-6706133978774028288-iN4U

  • QA

    Q&A AMA

    7 days ago #

    Question from Brian Park

    If you had only 2-3 months to get several hundred signups, what uber-creative yet effective growth tactics would you use?

    • WV

      Ward van Gasteren

      5 days ago #

      Hi Brian, a pretty open question! To be honest, I think I'd need some more details to give you a more satisfying, more relevant & more creative answers, but for now I'll accept your challenge and share some of my most 'uber-creative' tactics that I haven't had the chance of applying:

      • WV

        Ward van Gasteren

        5 days ago #

        Send leads an automated ringless voicemail after signing up. Seems very personal and shows you who is really interested. Slybroadcast is a tool that helps you do this.

      • WV

        Ward van Gasteren

        5 days ago #

        Go full ballistics with a crazy crazy story outside April 1st. It will give you so much coverage, podcasts slots, and differentiation from your competitors, that it's perfect to get momentum. Next to that, you also get a lot of new social followers, backlinks and if it's controversial, but also caters a very specific segment, you might also get brand ambassadors for life.

      • WV

        Ward van Gasteren

        5 days ago #

        Advertise on the websites where we all go, but no-one talks about... P*hub. Very cheap, very big reach.... but very strange as well. Probably good for awareness, terrible conversion rates.

    • WV

      Ward van Gasteren

      5 days ago #

      If instead you prefer to hear the non-creative, but effective way of getting hundreds signups in 2-3 months, I would say:

      • WV

        Ward van Gasteren

        5 days ago #

        Go super niche-focused and hit the nails hard:

        1. Pick a niche that is as small as you can go to still hit your targets. In B2B I would go for a Top Hundred Hitlist, while in B2C I would go for an audience size of max. 10.000.

      • WV

        Ward van Gasteren

        5 days ago #

        2. Create a door-opener piece of content that is irresistible for that niche, by targetting their biggest pain. The more specific for them, the better. "A Meetup for LA Real Estate brokers with low-ticket listings on how to cut your time-spend in half with each client" or for B2C "A free 7-day training program that will turn your diet & exercise habit upside down, to become beachbody ready within 6 months".

      • WV

        Ward van Gasteren

        5 days ago #

        3. Make a clear path to your paid product and show how that helps them solve that problem even better and more sustainably. This is the time where you can educate them on why a solution, that is less appealing than the opening-offer, is actually what they need to have for better results.

        Note: If your product isn't good at solving the problem, you won't make it anyway.

  • QA

    Q&A AMA

    7 days ago #

    Question from Samantha Afetian

    Which growth hacking tactics have worked best for you?

    • WV

      Ward van Gasteren

      5 days ago #

      Referral Programs and User Generated Content. If you can get your users to attract other users, every next step becomes so easier, until at some point you don't have to do anything and growth gets out of control.

  • QA

    Q&A AMA

    7 days ago #

    Question from Adam Miller

    What are the ways you prioritize unpaid user acquisition tactics for a new product?

    • WV

      Ward van Gasteren

      5 days ago #

      Very low.

      To get the engines started, you have to put in money or a lot of real effort. Most unpaid acquisition tactics take too long to make a positive ROI, where you get cash flow problems if that would be the only channel to attract customers. While if you get a paid channel moving that brings in your first customers, you can buy yourself time to grow those unpaid channels to the level that they become valuable.

      Also, most unpaid channels become more valuable when you have more people there. Think of organic social, where your first hundred followers are just as hard as the next thousand. If you can get that first hundred through paid marketing, you at least get the flywheel moving and it could save you months of hustling through the mud.

      Hope that this clarifies it a bit, Adam :)

  • GN

    Gustavo Nunes

    7 days ago #

    Hi, Ward. Tks for hosting this session with us and congrats on the course at GH University

    1. When a company hires your services as coach/consultant what are some of the misconceptions that they have abt growth hacking?
    2. What is the difference in the growth mindset when working with companies like TikTok vs KMPG? What they can learn from each other?
    3. How to identify that you're testing a new growth strategy or just another A/B test, for example?
    4. What people can expect from your Ultimate Beginners Course to Growth Hacking?

    • WV

      Ward van Gasteren

      5 days ago #

      Thanks for all your questions, Gustavo!

      1. The biggest misconceptions are still around 'What is Growth Hacking?'. Everybody has a different picture of it, and often I get hired while several stakeholders don't even understand what it actually is that I'm going to be doing. I then have to explain how the process works and they're often surprised by how much work goes into it. Next to that, I think that a lot of people feel like growth hacks are always quick-and-dirty, while in reality users just expect a certain level of quality and that takes more time than people were hoping to invest in those growth hacks

    • WV

      Ward van Gasteren

      5 days ago #

      2. Haha I think you have two very opposite company cultures there. There's a lot that people at big corporates can learn from scaleups. The main thing in my experience is that people need to learn that it's okay to make mistakes. Scaleups often know that they will break things and fix them again, while in corporates most people are very afraid of getting fired if they make a mistake, which paralyzes their ability to act quickly or take a risk.

      On the other hand, that's where scaleups can learn a bit from big organizations: Taking a step back and looking at the long-term plans behind actions could have an impact on how you approach it at the beginning.

    • WV

      Ward van Gasteren

      5 days ago #

      3. Well that's something you should notice during prioritization. I always work with the PIE-criteria, where for Impact I ask people to rank all opportunities for two questions on a scale of 1 to 5, where 1 = small and 5 = big.

      First, "How big reach in # people?". If you focus on a part of your customer journey where there are a lot of people seeing the implementation, the impact of this being successful will be much bigger versus you improving a little thingy on the bottom of a page that nobody visits.

      Second, "Big change vs current situation?". If the change is bigger, your impact will also be bigger. If this score is too low, you're probably playing it too safe... Consider going a bit bigger, because the impact could also be bigger. If it doesn't work, you can always turn the ship around and go back to the way it was.

      By answering those two questions, you always know that you're really making a big impact.

      If you want to see my full experiment sheet, it's here:https://growwithward.com/experiment-sheet/

    • WV

      Ward van Gasteren

      5 days ago #

      4. For that course, you can expect to learn everything you need to know to get started as a growth hacker. It's a very broad field, but at least you know how to handle the job and what your next steps should be at any point in time. The only thing you need to do from there is making flight-hours to get experienced in the execution and you learn what the reality looks like.

  • JA

    Juan Amaya

    6 days ago #

    Hey Ward, I'm truly admiring the work you're doing!!
    I work in the influencer marketing industry. Any ideas that come to your mind on how to increase my response rate when offering new deals?

    • WV

      Ward van Gasteren

      5 days ago #

      Hi Juan!

      What I do when approaching influencers online, is the not-scalable way: making sure that I interact with them (liking a few pictures, leaving in-depth comments and reading their stuff), then I try to make the conversation as personal as possible (by referring to things they've mentioned, what I've read from them that would make my deal applicable to them and what collaboration could look like).

      If the ask isn't that big (giving them the product for free in the hopes of them potentially promoting it), it's often not that hard and I get a pretty good response rate for very little effort.

      But if I'm going to bring a big ask, I try to also give something big upfront: We shoutout to them, we promote them randomly, we donate to a good cause that they're supporting. Ideally, you would look at what they're up to lately (stories, recent posts, and comment sections) and try to understand what their next goal is: Growth, Recognition, Making money, Raising awareness, etc. And you try to help them reach that goal, before you ask for anything in return.

      It feels bad and manipulative if I write it down right here, but I personally really believe in karma and giving without expectations. Doing business with someone who likes you is so much easier

  • JD

    James D.

    6 days ago #

    Hi Ward, hope you are doing well.

    I am conducting research on how growth hacking can be implemented as an effective growth strategy amongst SaaS startups in the Netherlands.

    I was hoping you could provide some insight on the following questions:

    - Seeing as there are several tactics within growth hacking, is there a specific set up of tactics you believe are most effective based on your experience?
    - Which growth hacking framework would you recommend SaaS startups use, and why?
    - Within the Pirate Funnel (AARRR), BRASS framework, or G.R.O.W.S. process, is there a specific phase you believe is most important? If so, what type of strategy works best?
    - Do you believe that in order for startups to achieve growth, they should consider hiring growth hacking agencies, or train their personnel how to hack growth?
    - Which element or factor do you believe is most important within growth hacking for startups? Ex. having proper metric systems set up?

    Thanks in advance - and good luck with the session!

    Kind regards,

    James D.

    • WV

      Ward van Gasteren

      5 days ago #

      Wow, James! Those are a lot of questions and I have even more questions to ask back to you. Shall we hop on a call soon - I'd love to help you but I think I need some more background information and context on what you're looking for in an endresult

  • KS

    Ken Savage

    6 days ago #

    I promote contact for my clients. Are there particular platforms that you like to promote one off articles and blog posts?

    • WV

      Ward van Gasteren

      5 days ago #

      Best places that I know are:
      - Quora, where you answer questions by giving them a part of the content and link to the rest of it.
      - Zest.is and Pocket, where people are always learning.
      - Industry-related forums. For me, those are GrowthHackers.com, IndieHackers, Reddit, Facebook Groups etc.
      - A bit more time-consuming: Repurposing parts into guest posts on other websites.

  • TS

    Thorsten Strauss

    6 days ago #

    Hi Ward,

    do you have a checklist when Growth Hacking, testing or agile doesn’t make sense.

    I am hearing more and more that growth hacking is dead. Product led growth is now hip. And we are returning to fundamentals.

    Is GH dead (see Google trends Growth hacking vs product led growth)

    „first fire all the growth hackers“ and work on your product was the advise from Andy Johns.

    • WV

      Ward van Gasteren

      5 days ago #

      Thanks Thorsten for this question! 👍

      Honestly, I think that neither of them is the perfect solution if you look at them bluntly: If Growth Hacking is all about attracting people and not product, you won't win, but also only focusing on your product and "the customers will come by themselves", won't be sustainable.

      In both cases, you should be focusing on a North Star: How can we help most people solve their pain in the best possible way? Sometimes that means that you should focus more on attracting more people to make a bigger impact, while other times it's clear that you can have a bigger impact when you try to solve the problem better by improving your product.

    • WV

      Ward van Gasteren

      5 days ago #

      About the checklist: I think that testing/agile/growth hacking is always applicable, because why would you go all-in if you're not sure that you'll get a good ROI. That's just taking big risks. Even if you have a lot of money, you probably want to be sure that your 1 million dollar campaign will be effective, by testing it with 100K first or organizing panel discussions.

      The only moment when you should NOT be doing testing/agile working, is when it's obvious to everyone in the room that adjusting something will be a good move: a type on your site, adding a how-does-it-work page to your site after everybody keeps asking for one through support, removing form fields when you actually didn't use the information at all, etc. Those no-brainers can only cost you a lot of time/effort.

      You could also say that you might not want to go data-driven, if the output can't be measured properly: Giving back to the community can be very valuable, but you can't measure the ROI very well. In those cases, you should say that you TEST it for a few months and hear what the responses are, and if you still want to continue with it.

  • JS

    John Salvador

    5 days ago #

    If a website has multiple landing pages dedicated to specific intake marketing campaigns, what is the best way to integrate these pages on the site from an SEO point of view, and the best way to avoid having these pages dilute the SEO of the home page and primary intake funnel?

    • WV

      Ward van Gasteren

      4 days ago #

      Hi John!

      If those are temporary campaigns, I would create a section on your homepage and in your footer of current campaigns that are running. If the campaigns are location based, create a Regions overview page. If the campaigns are persona-based, I would create an overview page 'For who's where you can explain the different personas you serve.

      At any time, there has been a reason for you to set up campaigns in that manner, and for that reason you can create an overview page.

      That page could be linked to once from the footer, headermenu or homepage, and wouldn't impact your homepage to much.

  • FK

    Faisal KT

    5 days ago #

    Hi Ward,

    I am paid ad consultant, I work with my clients to grow their revenue using Facebook + Instagram Ads and Youtube Ads. Is Growth hacking is only about Organic Growth or it's applicable to paid ads also. How can a Paid ad expert become a Growth Hacker?,

    • WV

      Ward van Gasteren

      4 days ago #

      Hi Faisal! No growth hacking/growth marketing is about more than organic growth. Most of the time, paid tactics will actually be the first tactics that are implemented (after you took care of big bottlenecks on the website/in the proposition), because they have a quick impact and are often no-brainers to have in your marketing mix.

      Only then you move on to organic tactics. Paid channels are effective but also limited. Organic channels take a long time to become effective, but they have a much much bigger potential because it can grow in directions where you don't even have to put effort into.

    • WV

      Ward van Gasteren

      4 days ago #

      To grow from paid to the broader picture of growth, you have to start helping a business all over the Pirate Funnel. And you really have to diversify the tactics that you bring to the table, because every client will have a different growth-problem, and thus they all need a different solution. If you can only bring one solution (paid marketing), you can't always bring them the best results.

      If you want to, I've created a course here at GrowthHackers University, where I explain everything you'd need to know about becoming a growth hacker. So you'd learn everything about when to use paid vs organic, all the skills you'd need (where paid is just one out of 15 skills discussed) and the whole process that you could follow as a growth consultant. I believe there's still a 25% discount right now, because of the AMA https://growthuniversity.teachable.com/p/beginners-course-to-growth-hacking

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