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Tyson Quick* is a digital marketing and advertising expert who’s addicted to creating amazing user experiences and laser-focused on perfecting the landing page creation and optimization process. As the founder and CEO of Instapage, the post-click optimization platform for advertisers and marketers, Tyson brings a lifetime’s worth of entrepreneurial experience and has built an organization that is poised to revolutionize digital advertising through personalized audience targeting.

Instapage was not born out of an “a-ha” moment. Instead, it sprang from a series of observations, or more accurately, anti-observations. Tyson founded Instapage in 2012 after seeing how performance and growth marketers were losing money in woefully underperforming advertising campaigns. His vision since then has been to create a post-click optimization product suite that maximizes returns through advertising personalization.

To date, more than 15,000 businesses, including HelloFresh, Soundcloud, and Vimeo, rely on Instapage.

 

*Tyson is speaking at the #GHConf19 stage.

 

  • ND

    Nicolai Doreng-Stearns

    6 months ago #

    What is the advantage of having a unique post-click experience for every ad/ad group?

    What does the future of advertising look like from your perspective?

    What's the biggest thing you've seen change in the market from when you first started Instapage to now?

    Any advice for future founders getting ready to start their own ventures?

    • TQ

      Tyson Quick

      6 months ago #

      This is my favorite question:

      The advantage of having a unique-post click experience for every ad/ad group is that those who have chosen to engage with your advertising are given a contextually relevant and thus meaningful experience that matches the expectations they had when they engaged.

      For you, this means a much larger chance of success and a lot less wasted money. We see customers increase their success by up to 7x when this methodology is deployed.

    • TQ

      Tyson Quick

      6 months ago #

      The biggest change in the market from when I first started is probably the proliferation of available marketing technologies. (see: https://chiefmartec.com/2018/04/marketing-technology-landscape-supergraphic-2018/)

      When I first started there were 350 MarTech SaaS solutions on the market and as of last year, there were over 7,000. This is more than a 20x in less than a decade.

      To navigate this complexity, I highly recommend focusing on point solutions for each stage of the funnel.

      For B2C Funnel:
      Clicks - Advertising Platforms
      Conversion - Instapage, Optimizely, Adobe Experience Cloud
      Purchase - Shopify, Magento
      Upsell - Pardot, Marketo, MailChimp

      For B2B Funnel:
      Clicks - Advertising Platforms
      Conversion - Instapage, Optimizely, Adobe Experience Cloud
      Nurture - Marketo, HubSpot
      Close - Salesforce, Pipedrive

  • AS

    Alexandru Stoica

    6 months ago #

    How was the transition from mvp to product in terms of scaling the business?

    • TQ

      Tyson Quick

      6 months ago #

      In 2012 when I started the business, we had minimal resources (~$75,000) left, and we needed to be incredibly scrappy. We needed to get to revenue as soon as possible.

      Doing so required us to go after the lowest hanging fruit. This meant low value, but easy to acquire customers. These customers are also the most forgiving of MVP products.

      Thus we priced our product at only $5 a page, which is a far cry from where we're at today. This initial strategy allowed us to start generating cash and helped us get to a point where we could at least pay our own bills.

      Once we got to his point, we started planning the next phase. We increased prices and eliminated the per page model as it wasn't going to be sustainable in the long term.

      At this point, the product was still rough around the edges, and we still hadn't figured out our ideal customer persona and absolute best use case. Regardless the product had gotten a bit better, and so we introduced our first monthly pricing tiers. I believe we started at $17/month with some other plans that went up to $97/month.

      4 Share
    • TQ

      Tyson Quick

      6 months ago #

      At this point we started making a bit more money and were able to pass the $1,000,000 mark, however, we still didn't have solid product-market fit and still wouldn't for a few years.

      The reason; when I first went to market with Instapage v.1, I assumed that every marketer who had a marketing campaign would need landing pages and thus the market potential had to be enormous.

      The problem with this was to create a highly valuable solution in this space, we had to build many products that would work together to solve the end-to-end workflow of deploying and optimizing landing pages.

      Create - We needed a design product
      Collaborate - We needed a collaboration product
      Integrate - We needed an integration ecosystem
      Optimize - We needed experimentation products.

      Without any one of these products, the solution could not provide a complete solution to the problem.

      4 Share
    • TQ

      Tyson Quick

      6 months ago #

      Fast forward a few years to 2016, and we started to realize that there were two types of customers:

      Builders - Are looking for a fast way to build a few pages for a temporary campaign or test.

      Converters - Are looking for a way to increase advertising conversion.

      Our mistake was that we had marketed the value of building more than the value of converting more of your advertising traffic. For the builders, the value is becoming a commodity; however, for the converters, the value is quantified by how much ROI they can get out of their advertising investment.

      We began to realize that we needed to focus entirely on the converters to establish longterm product-market fit and thus launched our enterprise offering and built a product and marketing roadmap that would transition to this entirely over the next two years.

    • TQ

      Tyson Quick

      6 months ago #

      So here we are in 2019, and we have done precisely that. The majority of our new revenue growth is from Enterprise and those enterprise customers have a 112% annual revenue retention (they expand). They are using our product based on its true value.

      It took us over five years to establish product-market fit, but we persevered and now have a fast growing enterprise software company which is defining a new category we call "Post-Click".

      4 Share
    • TQ

      Tyson Quick

      6 months ago #

      Hi Alexandru. The transition from MVP to product-market fit (I assume this is your question) was a long one.

      I'm going to type up a longer reply now.

  • GR

    Growth Rockstars

    6 months ago #

    Big fan of Instapage and use it daily. I think the pricing structure of the instapage has not changed in a long time. Amy plans On experimenting with pricing Models as i believe there is a huge growth potential.

    • TQ

      Tyson Quick

      6 months ago #

      We changed the pricing a bit last August, however, we will be experimenting more with this in the near future.

      I'd love to hear your suggestions as this is always a work in progress.

      3 Share
  • VM

    Vijay Mandeep

    6 months ago #

    Would like to know the following:

    1. What made you build Instapage?
    2. How did you transition from an MVP to a full-blown product?
    3. Were there any specific roadblocks? If yes, then how did you overcome them?
    3. Any key challenge that advertisers will face in the future with changing digital architectures?

    Looking forward to an interactive AMA!

    • TQ

      Tyson Quick

      6 months ago #

      Hey Vijay, thank you for the questions:

      1. I built Instapage because I discovered that the industry average conversion rate for digital advertising was under 4%. This seemed absurd to me considering that these were people who had already chosen to engage with an ad.

      The problem is even worse when you put the scale of the problem in context. This year we are on track to collectively spend $300,000,000,000 in digital advertising. This means that $288.6 billion of that at the average 3.8% conversion rate is going straight into the trash, or into the bank accounts of Google and Facebook to be more precise.

      I hypothesized that the main problem was that we had spent all of this time segmenting and creating targeting advertising, only to drive traffic to the generic homepage of our website.

      My team created some experiments where we produced ~10 highly unique and personalized post-click landing pages for our top 10 ad groups. This contextual relevancy to the ad increased our conversions from 3% to 18% almost instantly.

      Once I discovered this, I wanted to bring a scalable end to end solution to market that would give anyone the ability to deploy unique post-click experiences at the same speed/scale as they can deploy ads. Instapage was born.

      4 Share
    • TQ

      Tyson Quick

      6 months ago #

      3. Were there any specific roadblocks? If yes, then how did you overcome them?

      We've had dozens of roadblocks during our 7-year journey. Some of the main ones were:

      a. Getting to our first $1M, $10M & $20M.
      b. Building product, marketing, sales, success, engineering, business development teams from scratch.
      c. Hiring and competiting for talent in the San Francisco Bay area.
      d. Hiring our first VP's
      e. Transitioning from Self-Serve only to offering an Enterprise solution.
      f. Transitioning from the "builders" persona (see the story in the first question thread), to the "converters" only.
      g. Competing against a market that wants to commodify itself.

      Each one of these has very long answers and I am short on time. Hopefully, I can come back and elaborate further.

      That said my main advice for overcoming these has been following this quote.

      4 Share
      • TQ

        Tyson Quick

        6 months ago #

        The quote is:

        "I’m convinced that about half of what separates the successful entrepreneurs from the non-successful ones is pure perseverance."
        Steve Jobs

    • TQ

      Tyson Quick

      6 months ago #

      2. I answered #2 in the first question at the top of the page ;)

  • JM

    Jordan McAuley

    6 months ago #

    I have a large database of static HTML pages. They rank well, but is there an easy way to make them mobile friendly?

    • TQ

      Tyson Quick

      6 months ago #

      Hi Jordan, If my rank well, you are referring to SEO then I can't offer much opinion here. The reason for this is we built instapage to facilitate higher conversions for the ad-to-page experience.

      Our customers are not focused on SEO and instead build unique landing page experiences for all of their ads, ad groups, and campaigns to increase the success of their efforts. Most of these pages are hidden from search indexing.

      • TP

        Taylen Peterson

        6 months ago #

        Do you have any advice for creating mobile-first landing page experiences for ad campaigns? Anything that you've done that helps mobile pages perform better?

  • BW

    Brandon Weaver

    6 months ago #

    If every ad should be assigned to a unique post-click page, that can get overwhelming quickly. How do you suggest advertisers and marketing teams achieve that at scale?

  • HN

    Hannah Nguyen

    6 months ago #

    Hi,
    I have a question: I am running a SAAS business for a year, but I just have above 200 users ( including 5 paid users).
    Please, could you give me some advice to grow hack for my biz?
    For more information about my biz: we develop an analytics and marketing automation platform for Ecommerce; our target customers are SME business owners.
    We still have traffic but the conversion rate is too low.
    Thanks in advance.

    • TQ

      Tyson Quick

      6 months ago #

      My main advice is this:

      1. Marketing automation is an incredibly competitive space with big incumbents. Find your UVP (unique value proposition) and go all in on it.

      2. Marketing automation is a practice that is most relevant to larger companies, price accordingly.

      3. Don't go self-serve as marketing automation is too complex of an offering to have solid success and you need to be able to pitch directly to your potential customers for the first 100 enterprise deals. This way you control the buying experience, prevent commodification and get incredible feedback. I wish we did this at the beginning.

      4. Increase your prices. Nobody wins in a race to the bottom and tells the market you are cheap and probably not worth their time. Another mistake we made early on.

      5. Never offer freemium, it almost never works.

      6. Listen to your customers, iterate, iterate, iterate.

      7. Persevere.

      3 Share
  • DS

    Donatas Simkus

    6 months ago #

    Q1: Why are you not doing live video streaming?
    You could go through more questions, explain and connect to people better. :)

    Q2: How do rate this landing page? Why?
    What could you do better?

    • TQ

      Tyson Quick

      5 months ago #

      They did not provide me with a live video stream option.

      What landing page are you referring to?

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