Leave a comment
Get the GH Bookmarklet

AMAs

Eyal Toledano, CEO at Batch, is a serial technologist with a deep focus on growth engineering. Having led GTM and/or growth at companies like Sonder, Sociable Labs, ManyChat, NestReady, Camellia Sinensis, Spoil and others across SaaS, mobile and ecommerce, Eyal has a deep and technical understanding of the How and Why behind startup hypergrowth.

As a full-stack strategic growth leader, Eyal's depth of knowledge is cutting-edge across all core growth disciplines spanning stats, programming, product design, UX principles, behavioral psychology and storytelling. These enable advanced performance in conversion optimization, testing, wireframing, funnel marketing, copywriting and database management. Enjoy his AMA session to ask him anything related to these topics.

Across the last ten years, Eyal has acquired experience performing in B2B and B2C roles spanning gaming, SaaS, eCommerce, marketplaces, bots, blockchain and more while keeping particular attention to building cross-talent relationships in pursuit of future entrepreneurship. 

Recently, Eyal joined forces with GrowthHackers University. And if you want to master hypergrowth fundamentals & engineer a model that overdelivers every goal, we invite you to learn more about Eyal's new course Growth Models & Goalseeking.

Also make sure that you're following him here, on Twitter and Linkedin

  • PL

    pallav learn

    about 2 months ago #

    Another question: Is growth hacking more about "Coming up with crazy marketing ideas" or "Setting up an engine to test ideas and iterate quickly"?

    • ET

      Eyal Toledano

      about 1 month ago #

      I wrote an answer to your original question but it looks like it was removed just as I was going to submit my reply. Luckily I copied it. :) I'll write out both answers here for you:

      1) How do we keep on coming up with new ideas for growth hacking?

      When we say growth hacking, I think it’s important to make the distinction that you are trying to accomplish a standard goal (growth) by using a non-standard method (hacking together things that don’t usually go together).

      By nature, generic growth hacks are very short-lived because the non-standard method usually doesn’t last very long. 

That means you’re taking advantage of a current mechanism.

      This implies some level of discovery, which also implies some amount of digging and exploring to be exposed to discovering patterns that, when combined, accomplishes your desired goal

      

For example, back in the early days of Facebook ads, it was discovered that custom audiences could be created by uploading a list of Facebook User IDs.
      This discovery led to marketers trying to find ways to build lists of Facebook User IDs so they could target only their ideal persona.

      Eventually, marketers started scraping members of various Facebook groups discussing the marketer’s niche because they found that the members’ user ID’s were exposed in the source code, making it possible to build large lists at scale. 



      This outdated example is still valid: it starts by keeping your eyes open for a mechanism that has the potential for an unorthodox application and matching that mechanism to a discovered conduit of information to make the mechanism work (i.e. creatively finding Facebook IDs to upload them to Facebook).



      I recently discovered that Mixpanel cohorts can be exported as Facebook custom audiences.

      Are you kidding me? That means I could reasonably retarget my users at every step of the lifecycle with precision and at extremely low cost (as I would be deploying ad spend to an extremely small slice of the greater Facebook population).

      This is hardly a growth hack, but it does cut the effort required in producing high-performing Facebook ads and by that definition, it probably qualifies :)

      Note: You can't build a whole company on growth hacks. It's just not sustainable and I wouldn't ever advise taking on that (hope-based) strategy

      Onto your second question:

      2) Is growth hacking more about "Coming up with crazy marketing ideas" or "Setting up an engine to test ideas and iterate quickly"?

      It’s probably not a great idea to spend too much energy thinking about the linguistic differences, but I do regard growth hacking as “coming up with crazy marketing ideas,” insofar as those ideas help you create some nonstandard and ephemeral mechanism that accomplishes your goal.

      

In my experience, it’s far more valuable to consider growth as an engineered result, not one that relies on luck or ‘crazy marketing ideas’.

      My favourite example of true growth is SEO because you simply cannot achieve SEO success without a strategy that compounds the amount of traffic finding your website over time.

      And that itself is a factor of having great content that satisfies a growing number of search demand volume and having enough backlinks (itself, a lot of deliberate work) to push your website up the results. Every activity feeds the last and the wave gets larger and larger.

      This approach is engineered growth and I’d say it’s the only disciplined way to really reach your goals.



      You’re correct that building engines quickly and then iterating on those engines’ parts to make them work (and therefore valuable) is the right way — but the reason growth hacking exists is because true growth is hard, really hard.

      And in some circumstances, like if you’re running out of runway in 6 months, you need results NOW and that can be a time and place for coming up with a creative approach that can produce a large windfall for a short period of time through unorthodox means (keep your white hat on).

      Thanks and good luck!

      5 Share
  • EC

    ENRIQUE CALVO RAMOS

    about 2 months ago #

    What would be your advice for someone starting as Growth Manager in a small but solid start-up when he/she would be the first person in that position? Thanks

    • ET

      Eyal Toledano

      about 1 month ago #

      Hey Enrique, thanks for your question!

      Being the first marketing hire is both exhilirating and hugely challenging. You're going to wear many hats, there's no going around that.

      But if you can limit the number of hats you wear and increase the amount of time you wear each hat, you'll award yourself the possibility to be really good at the (few) things you do to really move the needle.

      By that virtue, you'll have to be really strategic about what activities you choose to deploy because there is a limited time to figure what you're going to rely on the most to hit your targets (80/20 rule).

      That requires some introspection on the startup you're working for, the kind of market you're after, the product that was built in response to the market opportunity, the business model that you have to work with and the resulting acquisition parameters (like your budget and your cost of acquisition) at your disposal.

      Generally, being clear on those things will give you a good idea of what kind of activities you must focus on and the nature of the startup itself will help you trim away ideas that obviously won't work either at this stage or altogether for the kind of company that you are.

      More actionably:

      I'd focus on building systems and resist "campaign" thinking as much as possible. You should certifiably aim to launch new systems with a campaign, with the clear intent that the system will continue yielding value over time after you stop actively investing in its launch campaign.

      For example, start a content machine early so you can iterate. Campaigns take a lot of energy and don't yield continuous results (they die down). It takes more effort, but if you can manage to ensure that every activity you undertake for the startup results in a new system that itself continuously produces value, you'll enjoy compounding returns from those efforts which makes it possible to reach ever-growing targets. I'm talking about systems that earn you traffic, earn you leads, earn you trials, earn you repeat customers, earns you retained users -- you name it.

      Most importantly, this type of thinking will make it possible to work on just a few things at once, as those things won't have to produce HUGE results to reach your goals, because they will be supported by other systems who themselves also contribute to your topline. You want a growing portfolio of assets that help you constantly deliver on your targets.

      Good luck!

      5 Share
  • MV

    Maja Voje

    about 2 months ago #

    Hey Eyal! Thanks for doing this AMA!
    What are your go-to tools for user-centric analytics and what do you recommend companies who would like to start using it? Thanks! 🙏

    • ET

      Eyal Toledano

      about 1 month ago #

      Hey Maja! Thanks for your question.

      Without question, the winners in this category are Segment, Mixpanel/Amplitude, and Hotjar.

      Understanding the behaviour of users across a stack is deeply valuable and engrained in the process of testing and iteration. You can’t test what you cannot measure, and those tools are what I usually reach for when setting up a new stack.

      I aim to collect both qualitative and quantitative data.

      Qual data you look at tends to create questions like “Hmm, why is this happening?”

      Quant data helps you answer those questions and formulate hypotheses you can implement, control against and verify. 



      What I suggest is integrating with Segment across your website, product front-end and back-end so you can efficiently track key events and properties that will help tell a story about how users are consuming your product, and what kind of attributes play a role in the success of your customers. 



      Segment is really useful because it helps you integrate a variety of tools — like Mixpanel, Google Analytics, Hotjar, and countless others — without incurring the integration costs more than once. 



      What that means is that the time and energy spent tracking the various properties and events in your product doesn’t have to be repeated every time you want to integrate a new tool, which, beyond saving you time and energy, makes it incredibly easy to integrate new tools into your stack with lightning speed. 



      As an example, a customer of mine recently decided to move away from Mixpanel due to costs. We were able to simply turn on an Amplitude integration, which allowed all of their data to flow to both Mixpanel and Amplitude, before sunsetting the Mixpanel integration inside of Segment. Clean and painless.



      Segment also recently released Visual Tagging technology so you can start tracking UI interactions on your website without having to touch any code. Pretty neat.

      As a related aside: 

I’m working on a Data Tracking masterclass. If it’s something you’d like to keep up to date about, make sure to let me know on Twitter @eyaltoledano

      Thanks a lot and good luck!

      4 Share
  • PL

    pallav learn

    about 2 months ago #

    Hey! How do we keep on coming up with new ideas for growth hacking?

    • ET

      Eyal Toledano

      about 1 month ago #

      Hey, thanks for your question!

      When we say growth hacking, I think it’s important to make the distinction that you are trying to accomplish a standard goal (growth) by using a non-standard method (hacking together things that don’t usually go together).

      By nature, generic growth hacks are very short-lived because the non-standard method usually doesn’t last very long. Because it is non-standard (for whatever reason), it usually doesn't belong and quickly gets updated, removed or rectified.

      That means you’re taking advantage of some kind of existing mechanism. This implies some level of discovery, which also implies some amount of digging and exploring to be exposed to discovering patterns that, when combined, accomplishes your desired goal

      For example, back in the early days of Facebook ads, it was discovered that custom audiences could be created by uploading a list of Facebook User IDs.

      This discovery led to marketers trying to find ways to build lists of Facebook User IDs so they could target only their ideal persona.

      Eventually, marketers started scraping members of various Facebook groups discussing the marketer’s niche because they found that the members’ user ID’s were exposed in the source code, making it possible to build large lists at scale

      This outdated example is still valid: it starts by keeping your eyes open for a mechanism that has the potential for an unorthodox application and matching that mechanism to a discovered conduit of information to make the mechanism work (i.e. creatively finding Facebook IDs to upload them to Facebook).

      Another more recent example:

      I recently discovered that Mixpanel cohorts can be exported as Facebook custom audiences. Are you kidding me? That means I could reasonably retarget my users at every step of the lifecycle with precision and at extremely low cost (as I would be deploying ad spend to an extremely small slice of the greater Facebook population).

      This is hardly a growth hack, but it does cut the effort required in producing high-performing Facebook ads and by that definition, it probably qualifies :)

      I'd be remiss if I didn't add a caveat here: YOU CANNOT BUILD A COMPANY ON GROWTH HACKS. You cannot hack continuous growth -- hacking together something is a very short-term activity that is rarely justified amidst the many other activities that can deliver value over time without being as fickle and likely to stop working at any time.

      Good luck!

  • GN

    Gustavo Nunes

    about 2 months ago #

    Hey, Eyal.

    How do you prioritize your growth efforts: how do you know what to test and what to scale?

    • ET

      Eyal Toledano

      about 1 month ago #

      Hey man, thanks for the question!

      Let’s unpack that two-part question:


      First, how do you figure out what to test? 



      The answer to this is a methodical one: I have a clear picture of how my product SHOULD be behaving across the stack; from the way I generate traffic, to lead generation, to onboarding, to conversion, to retention and beyond, and what the economic value of each of those lifecycle stages is.

      

I’ve taken the time to model what the inputs and outputs of that are, which make it clear what the world OUGHT to look like.

      

Naturally, reality is quite different.

      I’ll have something in the wild and it will produce some result — often different than what I modelled. I can take that result back to my model and try to determine if what reality gives me supports my goals, and if not, I determine what the delta between reality and my model is, and I make that a goal.

      I can check the difference between where I’m at now and where I should be, and simply aim my next activity to making that a reality.



      Since you know what you’re trying to do and you know exactly the gap between how you’re doing and the benchmark you’re after, you know exactly what area you’re looking to optimize and cover so the ideas you come up with have balance that against the goal you’re trying to achieve. 


      As an example, imagine my model determines that: 

      - my ad CPC should not exceed $1.00, 

      - my visit-to-trial should be 15%+; and 

      - my trial-to-paid conversion should be 40%+

      This month, my visit-to-trial conversion rate plummets to 8%. Ouch.

      I have any options, but here are just a few:

      (a) I could find a way to slash my CPC in half so that having a 8% visit-to-trial conversion is derisked; 

      (b) I could try ideating a test that will increase the number of visitors who start a trial — perhaps by looking at my marketing channels, or the UI elements of my website; or I might even 

      (c) consider how an increase in trial-to-paid conversion would require less trials to reach the same goal.

      That's how I figure out what to test.

      Secondly, in terms of knowing what the scale: 

I tend to consider the nature of the object first. 

If I’m spending energy on something, there are two possible outcomes:
      
(a) the result will last for a long time; or 

      (b) the result will last for a short time. 



      If it lasts for a short time, I lose its benefits. Thus, I’d only scale something the benefits of which are valuable (read: profitable) to me at any point in time.

      That’s when I’d move from a ‘move fast and break things’ to a ‘systems’ mentality because I’d want to persist the thing I’ve spent energy on so I can perceive its benefits without having to constantly reinvest time and energy into it. 



      And as it turns out, the exercise of layering systems one on top of the other like that is the very exercise of producing growing results.

      Thanks Gustavo!

      2 Share
  • QA

    Q&A AMA

    about 1 month ago #

    Question from @jeyna

    Do you think that online presence focused on brand identity and storytelling could have a positive impact on user engagement?

    • ET

      Eyal Toledano

      about 1 month ago #

      Hello and thanks for your question!

      Storytelling and brand identify are like adjectives. You can’t lead with JUST that.
      The content to which you attach adjectives is what makes up the essence of a sentence. 



      Likewise, your brand story is a powerful way of enveloping your mission, but it needs to support it and not suffocate it. If you focus on it too much, your message will sound disconnected and without actual purpose. 



      The only way storytelling is a strength is if it represents a terrific way to summarize everything that you are.

      But that’s all it is; a gateway to attract, get known, get liked and get trusted, but the rest is still up to you and not that metaphysical construct which your brand really is.

      

A really nice example that I personally experienced was with a company previously called Flatbook (today called Sonder).

      As their digital marketing director, I was tasked with bringing in leads, so I was the first to feel the true impact that a strong brand message can enable.



      The brand message we created was a super simple, yet tantalizing gateway:



      “We’ll pay your rent while you’re away, guaranteed.” 



      It was a strong and attractive message that hugely empowered every marketing activity it was attached to because it resonated with the rest of the contents and acted as the ideal gateway for a product that would pay 100% of your rent while you’re out on vacation.

      Because who wants to waste rent money when that could literally pay for the vacation!

      

In exchange, they’d put your apartment up on Airbnb and keep all the profits. Leading with the latter message might have been a tough, tough sell, but in this case the story supported the call to action more than adequately. 



      Today, Sonder.com is a billion dollar brand. :)

      Thanks!

      1 Share
  • QA

    Q&A AMA

    about 1 month ago #

    Question from Shweta Jha

    If I am just starting out my eCommerce business with little to no experience, what advice would you give me?

    • ET

      Eyal Toledano

      about 1 month ago #

      Hey there, thanks for your question

      Business is pretty simple: people want to elevate their lives from the state they find themselves in to a future state where life is better, more enjoyable and more profitable.

      Choose a category of products and become obsessed by the kind of people who regularly buy these products.

      Understanding your target market is the best way to build compassion for it, which is a requirement if you ever hope to convince anyone to spend their money with you.

      If you have compassion for your market, then you truly understand it, and you can effectively communicate how your product can be the agent of the change your market is after.


      Learn to write compelling copy. That’s my number one advice.

      Ecommerce marketing is about describing the distance between today and the future for your customers and how the products you sell enable that future.

      It’s important to describe more than just what people will have when they buy from you. Take care to explain how their status will elevate, how their day will improve and how they themselves will feel.

      On a different note:

      Put automation to good use. If ads are going to be your primary means of acquisition, work out the math so you know what the value of every visit needs to be for you to be profitable, and be relentless at designing and iterating your website so it delivers that value.

      Once you can achieve this, buying traffic (a mere commodity) is no longer scary; it is exciting.

      In fact, when you figure out how to make more per visit than you tend to spend, customers will effectively be paying you to visit your website. When this happens, you should aim to increase your budget and drive revenue as you've effectively found market/product/channel/model fit.

      Thanks!

      1 Share
  • QA

    Q&A AMA

    about 1 month ago #

    Question from @mary-mathew

    What are the current marketing strategies to shine in SEO for an eCommerce Website?

    • ET

      Eyal Toledano

      about 1 month ago #

      Hello, thanks for your question!

      I’m no SEO expert by any stretch but the best advice I can give is to carefully consider the strength of your domain, and how that influences your ability to outrank other websites on search results.

      Other websites with higher domain authority will require more backlinks to overtake. 



      This means it’s likely worth searching for keywords whose top results are there with low domain authority AND with a low number of backlinks, as those rankings could be won without having a strong DA or many backlinks (which is what you want when you’re just starting off and don’t have much to support your strategy).


      Last I checked, something like 45% of online shopping journeys start with a Google search. The average e-commerce site gets something like one third of its traffic from organic.

      So by and large, the fundamentals still apply:

      1. Product-focused keyword research, what the hierarchy of your website is, what your core and related keywords should be and the relationship between them
      2. Website architecture setting up your site so a child content you create supports its parent category
      3. On-page SEO to ensure you actually send the right signals (JSON-LD, snippets, and so on)
      4. Content marketing actually executing a content calendar towards building authority around the main keywords and their children
      5. Link building for each of your assets so that they can better compete with similar solutions on search engines

      There are no silver bullets — you need to find and commit to the slice of search demand that has enough volume and small enough competition that you can secure a beachhead. 

But you also have to be putting in the usual work. But there is no magic. :)

      Your SEO strategy depends on how early you are — the earlier you are, the scrappier you should be whilst you build up your domain authority and secure layer able volumes of search traffic with the content you publish.


      Hope that helps!

      2 Share
  • QA

    Q&A AMA

    about 1 month ago #

    Question from Jay Gibb (@circuitfive)

    High price anchor versus "contact us for pricing" for B2B SaaS.. which do you prefer?

    • ET

      Eyal Toledano

      about 1 month ago #

      Hi Jay, thanks for the interesting question. I'll go ahead and elaborate:

      Instinctively, the answer to your question is a factor of a few things, namely the Product, the ARPU created by the SaaS model in question and the type of customer we’re talking about.

      

A mid market SaaS tends to have high affinity with self-service and would likely be leaving money on the table with a ‘contact us for pricing’ strategy (as such a strategy requires a human element for the close, the cost of which might also be too expensive relative the ARPU you collect)

      

If you’re working for a more enterprise level SaaS whose customer is highly conscientious or deliberate about the purchasing process (i.e. if there are multiple parties involved), a pricing anchor is not likely to have much influence on the purchasing decision, considering a self-serve context is out of the question (as we established multiple people are taking part in the process) and the exposure to the anchor pricing wouldn't happen.

      This is where a ‘contact us for pricing’ model is not only required, it is EXPECTED by the target customer.



      That said, you can still apply price anchoring regardless in the way you talk to your customer and present options. Introspect on the product you have at hand and consider the ideal selection so it sits in harmony with the other elements you have at play.



      It’s worth exploring my personal preference; which is to price anchor on a self-serve basis.

      I am highly attracted to self-serve SaaS and the power of anchoring can double a product’s run rate provided the pricing tiers are divided up based on features rather than capacity.



      One of the biggest mistakes I notice in SaaS pricing is capacity-based pricing tiers in a free-to-paid context. The best way to get someone to pay you money for the first time is by giving them more functionality; not more capacity (i.e. storage space).

      

On the opposite side of the spectrum, someone who’s willing to pay you $1 to get $10 is going to be willing to pay you $2 to get $20. Thus, capacity-based tiers make sense as an expansion strategy.

      Once you have a paying user, you do want to expand their ARPU by scaling your fees based on the value you deliver. HubSpot is a perfect example: free CRM product, must pay a minimum of $500/mo to get advanced features, and that cost scales the more email subscribers you get.



      I like using ‘contact us for pricing’ if my plan is to build a sales force that converts demos and meetings. That’s not usually my style, as I prefer self-serve products and high revenue per employee, but that is just what it is; a matter of style.

      Hope that is illuminating in some way!

      1 Share
  • QA

    Q&A AMA

    about 1 month ago #

    Question from Dan Carmel.

    How do you prioritize long term and short term goals?

    • ET

      Eyal Toledano

      about 1 month ago #

      Hey Dan, hopefully I understand what you mean with your question. Here goes;

      The idea of a short term goal is that it should help achieve the long term goal.

      In that spirit, any long term goal can be sub-divided into a sequence of milestones that feed from the previous milestone, and to make those very milestones the short term goals you focus on.



      Because I model for the year, I know what the general targets are every month and I can afford to zoom in for extended periods of time to focus on the specific parts of the model that I need to improve on.

      That focus is what helps me blur away everything else, as anything other than those few activities is unlikely to produce the result my model needs to be viable.

 But I prioritize those short-term efforts on a yearly or so basis to understand how the big pieces are going to be moving on the chessboard.

      In terms of sequencing those goals, when I model out the whole year, I’m very deliberate about which parts of the model improve and when.

      I don’t make everything go up in one shot — that would be an overwhelming number of things to improve and I’d be unlikely to improve any. 



      Instead, I tend to focus on a single KPI at a time. My growth model is just a calculator, and my job is to ensure every variable in that calculator is what it should be at any given moment.

      Since variables build on top of each other (to achieve a compounding effect), you can usually step back, look at the whole picture and plainly see the next thing that needs to be true to move the whole thing along.



      As an example, my long term product goal with Batch (a Shopify plugin) is to reliably have merchants activating offers that my product collects for them. 



      For that to be possible, I have to drive offers for merchants. 

      For that to be possible, consumers need to be making offers.
      
For that to be possible, my checkout flow needs to perform at a certain level. 

      And for that to be possible, I need a certain number of impressions of my widget.



      AKA to earn enough checkouts I need enough offers so I can make it possible for merchants to activate offers regularly, and I need enough impressions so I generate enough checkouts to get to the number of offers I need to reach my goal. 



      This reductive process makes it possible for me to blur out everything other than “product impressions” (as an example). Until I reach my “product impressions” benchmark, nothing beyond it is possible, and thus I focus exclusively on that KPI until I make that work.

      While I appreciate the need to move fast and break stuff, I find that i
It’s dangerous to time box too many creative things — it could take weeks/months to unlock the benchmarks you need.

      You can timebox efforts, but don't make it a habit of timeboxing results.

      Thankfully, that’s where the pay dirt is. Once you hit your benchmarks, your model is stronger, less risky, and more likely to come to fruition. It’s important to take the right risks, time them well, and pull on what works so you can pattern find and seek the next improvement.

      Hope that's useful!

      1 Share
  • AP

    Arvind Pal

    about 1 month ago #

    I'm coming off of Business Analysis, moving into Growth Hacking, I have been a marketer before, what should I learn now (Tools, Softwares, Techniques), in other words how do I get started and become a valuable asset as a "Growth Hacker"?

    • ET

      Eyal Toledano

      about 1 month ago #

      Quantitative thinking is a core function of the growth engineering process and your experience is likely to serve you well. I think it's really adequate that you're using air quotes around the term as it is often misunderstood.

      What an effective growth hire really does is own and improve one or many lifecycle stages. "Improve" means to accelerate the time it takes to get people coming through the door to value.

      To that end, your analysis skills can be useful provided you have a solid tracking plan in place. That's an area I'd aim to develop: being the guardian of data and being capable of recording, ingesting, analyzing, and compiling data into recommendations, insights and discoveries that can lead to pivotal changes.

      Become proficient at utilizing Segment.com for bootstrapping your data science; it's the foundational element for sending information from your devices to your reporting tools and marketing automation stack.

      You need to be in a position where you can reliably and accurately tell who is coming in, what they are doing and be able to surmise why they are doing it.

      That will lead you to experimentation, which is really just utilizing the information you've recorded to quantify the changes you should be making.

      From there, you can begin to hone in a process for identifying patterns, observing the relationship between behavioural events/properties and customer success and draw hypotheses about what kind of changes you ought to bring.

      If nothing else, this ability to very accurately track your efforts grants you strategic foresight, and that's where your experience can really make you shine.

      Best of luck!

      • AP

        Arvind Pal

        about 1 month ago #

        Thank you Mr.Toledano, I sincerely appreciate your input. I will surely look into your input with the organization I work with, we are not only looking into growing our business, but also planning to start a division for a growth hacking service with time.

        I was just curious if there were technical skills to be learnt before venturing into the field, I'm glad you and others haven't mentioned any.

        Thanks Again.

  • FF

    Fabio Massimo Ferrantini

    about 1 month ago #

    Was there ever time during your career when you had no income due to the time and energy you were investing in your enterprises? If so, how did you deal with this. thank you

    • ET

      Eyal Toledano

      about 1 month ago #

      Hey Fabio,

      My "career" started when I was just a teenager. I created lead generation websites for local businesses and sold them the leads. I was always a hustler, so I do identify with the context you're describing.

      Unfortunately, this feeling gets WORSE the more successful you become. If you don't live a structured, healthy life, the consequence of those actions will be exacerbated as you pull on your energy reserves even more (due to being successful).

      Three years ago, our family welcomed our first child and it profoundly changed how I had to manage whatever energy and time I had leftover after taking care of the child. It's really not easy, but this is more of a life design situation than anything else.

      You have to play with the cards you have. The answer is usually structure. We feel safer with structure around us. So design your life so you can reliably model how much time you have available over the next little while and learn to scope your efforts and activities balancing that time and energy consumption.

      If you're in the middle of trying to grow something and it's taking time and you're short on cash and energy, the only thing I can recommend is to speak frankly to yourself about what you'd do as an alternative. It doesn't help to ruminate on the present considering that's what you signed up for, but it is worth being self-aware of your unique context and how to make the most out of it.

      The worst thing you can do is compare yourself to others. I'd recommend comparing yourself to Yesterday You, and do everything in your might to incrementally improve on a daily basis. Let the power of compounding forces carry you out of your unique context if it's not one you're comfortable with.

      It's a hard world, and this is a hard zero-sum game with an unbelievable amount of survivorship bias. Make sure your house is in order, that you lead a healthy life, and have designed your schedule so productivity is a consequence and not a byproduct of chance.

      Hope that helps. Feel free to hit me up on Twitter with your progress!

  • ET

    Eyal Toledano

    about 1 month ago #

    Thanks everyone for taking the time to participate and cheers to @growthhackers for the invite.

    I'm constantly tweeting about product, growth engineering, digital marketing and other startups related stuff. You can follow me at https://twitter.com/eyaltoledano to keep in touch.

    I've also recently released the Growth Models & Goalseeking masterclass with Growth Hackers University. It's a 6 hour deep-dive introducing you to growth thinking and how to start orchestrating the growth journey of your product, how you'll acquire customers, at what cost, and what will happen thereafter. You can check it out at https://growthuniversity.teachable.com/p/growth-models/

    For the ecommerce growth hackers among us working with Shopify, be sure to discover the new Batch app, a powerful new tool to increase conversions, decrease abandonment and ditch coupon codes. You can learn more about it at http://www.sellwithbatch.com and install it for free directly from the Shopify App Store at https://apps.shopify.com/batch-offers

    Thanks again for this opportunity and I hope to keep in touch!

    @eyaltoledano

SHARE
51
51