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Brittany Bingham is VP of Marketing and Growth at RaiseMe, an EdTech startup reinventing educational pathways and changing the way students access scholarships. This mission-driven social enterprise has served over 1.3 million students across the United States on their way to college. 

Additionally, she advises for a handful of startups and contributes to educational programs in the growth space. 

Prior to joining RaiseMe early in 2018, Brittany led growth marketing at SurveyMonkey, where she was responsible for optimizing acquisition, conversion, engagement, and retention via marketing channels across all of SurveyMonkey's business units. This spanned from paid marketing to demand generation, email marketing to testing and beyond. 

Prior to her 3.5 years at SurveyMonkey, she led strategy at Milestone, a provider of digital marketing software and services for hospitality and retail industries.

  • EC

    Emília Chagas

    2 months ago #

    Hi Brittany, thank you for sharing your insights here. I have a couple questions:
    1. From Milestone to SurveyMonkey and now RaiseMe, what processes or projects you have implemented that you're most proud of?
    2. Many marketers sometimes struggle to engage the internal team with the content strategy. Do you have best practices to share on collaboration, both for the marketing team, executives and other teams (support, sales etc)?
    3. What would be your suggestions to marketers starting global content strategies?

    • BB

      Brittany Bingham

      2 months ago #

      Hi Emilia, great questions!
      1 - It’s hard to say exactly which project or process I’m most proud of - I’m often most charged by building a growth mindset on my team and executing on the small, iterative, rapid tests that win (and fail) that build up to the incremental growth that we achieve as an organization. That said, a major project that stands out is SurveyMonkey’s refreshed branding that launched in July 2017. After building the original branding over the 15 years that SurveyMonkey been around, our bold brand and creative team set out refresh the face of the company. As the growth marketing team, we were chartered to update everything from the marketing site to all of our marketing channel assets, our survey ‘Thank You’ pages which get millions of views every day and more (in all languages, globally) without deteriorating performance. This was a multi-month undertaking that was all hands on deck, and required a huge amount of optimization to intersect the design-led and performance-led world.

      1 Share
    • BB

      Brittany Bingham

      2 months ago #

      2 - This will vary quite a bit from organization to organization, but a few strategies that have worked well are:
      - For collaborating, I always find that getting the key players in a room (team leads, execs, etc.) to review a strategy proposal, or alternatively to workshop, can help engage them in the whole process. The earlier they’re involved, the more they lean into it.
      - For executing, creating workflows and adopting the right systems to support them so that everyone knows when they are accountable, where they go to get updates, and how to get involved. We used Trello for our workflow management, Slack for content notifications and reminders on what’s upcoming, and Google Docs for content editing. By using Slack, anyone who wants to get involved can, and those that are on the reactive side of content publication (e.g.: support) have ample notice before anything goes out.
      - To keep the velocity of people being engaged in the strategy, reporting out on results is always hugely important. The more that you can show the impact of content, the more the broader team is willing to invest and engage in it.

      1 Share
    • BB

      Brittany Bingham

      2 months ago #

      3 - This could be a long answer… but I’ll try to be brief! These strategies are particularly pertinent if you’re trying to take a scaled approach to international content marketing. The first thing that’s important from a global content strategy is the infrastructure: you have have a dynamic enough CMS or system that will allow you to display different content by market. When we refer to content, it’s not just a carbon copy translated, but managing for custom content, formatting, and design. Other languages are much longer than English, so make sure to plan for that.

      If you’re planning on going broad into quite a few languages, I’d suggest taking a ‘T’ approach to content creation. Translate (and thoroughly QA language) your core content (content that is not country specific) into all of your languages to get a foot out in market. It’s important that you still spend the time to review with local language contractors or employees as initial translations almost never sound native. We used string translation, and did thorough keyword research on our head terms to plug into the translations. This is the ‘broad’ part of the ‘T’. Then go more tailored into a few of your highest potential languages; the deep part of the ‘T’. This requires additional localized pages being built, research about key USPs for this market and use cases, visual design preferences, etc.

      If you’re strapped for additional content creation, you can also go the route of creating global ambassador programs or content contributors in your customer base, hiring local talent on a project basis, etc.

      1 Share
  • SE

    Sean Ellis

    2 months ago #

    Hi Brittany, thanks for doing this AMA with us.

    1) how would you describe the growth engine at SurveyMonkey? What were the most important components that drove growth?

    2) what was your biggest attraction to join the RaiseMe team?

    • BB

      Brittany Bingham

      2 months ago #

      Hi Sean, happy to be here!
      1- In short, the growth engine at SurveyMonkey was a highly impactful one and only getting stronger! I’ve referenced this in a few of the past answers, but the growth team in its most recent form was a hybrid of a centralized growth product team supplemented by additional testing conducted across all other teams. This team, growth product, worked closely with our growth marketing team. The structure allowed us to collectively increase the velocity of testing across the whole organization, increasing the rate of optimization of metrics tied to each of our teams, and left our core growth team the flexibility to work across teams, product properties, and on a more flexible testing cycle optimizing our northstar metrics. This was a key component of our most recent success - but ultimately the the most important component of our growth was maintaining and reinforcing a data-driven, testing mentality across the org as we scaled the size of our team.

      • BB

        Brittany Bingham

        2 months ago #

        2 - While there were so many factors about joining RaiseMe that were exciting for me (whether it being the interesting growth problems to solve balancing such a complex marketplace to helping scale an early stage startup), the most important component for me was the mission - helping students realize their college ambitions. I, as so many have, recognized that the education space could hugely benefit from growth and scaling strategies that we see so frequently applied in the SaaS space; I wanted to be a part of that transformation and process in an effort to help students everywhere.

  • TO

    Tiago Otani

    2 months ago #

    Hi Brittany, thank you for sharing your experience and knowledge with us!

    When you started at SurveyMonkey, did they already have a Growth area?
    How was it to implement such core changes in the company? Did you face resistance from other areas? How did you overcome that?

    • BB

      Brittany Bingham

      2 months ago #

      Hi Tiago, yes! SurveyMonkey had a strong foundation of being data driven and having a testing mentality early on, which became core to our company’s DNA (and was part of the reason I joined). I’m a believer that it’s never too early to start testing and encouraging a the team to be data-driven. That said, our growth team(s) evolved over time, consolidating growth marketing together, and moving from a centralized growth product team to a 'hybrid' model, supplementing the core team with testing conducted across all teams. Anytime that you suggest making changes, one of the most effective strategies that I have found works is to show the (positive) impact of these changes in the results, showcasing how it is beneficial to all teams. The proof is often right there in the numbers!

      2 Share
  • LS

    Lauren Schuman

    about 2 months ago #

    Hi Brittany,

    I’m wondering how you describe the difference between a growth team and other product and marketing teams? (Particularly if other teams are also experimenting similar to what you described in the hybrid model at SurveyMonkey.)

  • CS

    Christine Saba

    about 2 months ago #

    Hey Brittany - With your new role how do you like managing your team and are there any consistent methods you stand by that you've implemented across your career as a leader? (could be how you run meetings, how you manage different people, etc.)

    Thanks for doing the AMA!

  • ST

    Stanley Tan

    about 1 month ago #

    Hey Brittany, in your current and previous roles, how much autonomy do you get? Do you require each of your marketing decisions to go through a decision maker? For example, the graphic used in an email marketing newsletter, the copy of a landing page, etc.

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