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Hello! I run the website UserOnboard.com (@UserOnboard) and wrote a book called The Elements of User Onboarding. I have invested more time in studying user onboarding and its constituent parts than is probably healthy. Please feel free to ask me ANYTHING. You can also follow me at @SamuelHulick and @UserOnboard

  • SE

    Sean Ellis

    over 3 years ago #

    Thanks @samuelhulick for doing this AMA. I love what you’ve done with UserOnboard. What is your opinion on video as part of the user onboarding process? Does it ever make sense to use it? If so, when and why?

    • SH

      Samuel Hulick

      over 3 years ago #

      Ooh, that's tricky first question!

      Videos can be really enjoyable and informative to watch, but the issue I have with them is that they're a "lean back" activity, rather than an action-oriented one.

      When signing up for a product, people are bringing a lot of momentum and attention towards accomplishing something, and the more opportunities you have to harness and guide that momentum, rather than interrupt it, the better in my opinion.

      As fun as videos are, I put them in the category of other flow-blockers like tooltip tours and *shudder* email confirmation that break up the flow of the experience rather than directly progress it.

      Videos are also risky because if they feature the interface in any way, they will have to be constantly updated, and they're relatively expensive to make, as contrasted with simple copy, images, etc.

      I'd much rather design an innately intuitive experience that requires as little explanation and introduction as possible, and experiment with "cheaper" forms of intro content.

  • MB

    Morgan Brown

    over 3 years ago #

    Hey Samuel,

    Thanks for doing this AMA with us! Question for you:

    When you're thinking about product and engineering resources and building a new product, how much time/effort should be invested in onboarding vs core product functionality?

    Also, is there a notion of an MVP onboarding experience?

    • SH

      Samuel Hulick

      over 3 years ago #

      "Is there a notion of an MVP onboarding experience?"

      The M-est onboarding experience that I recommend is to simply "be" it yourself. Personally escorting people through finding value in your product will beat out a million wizards, walkthroughs, and tooltip tours.

      Then take the insights you gained and turn them into improvements to the product itself, rather than stapling something else on top of it.

    • SH

      Samuel Hulick

      over 3 years ago #

      "When you’re thinking about product and engineering resources and building a new product, how much time/effort should be invested in onboarding vs core product functionality?"

      This is a hard question to answer, because when done well the onboarding experience and core product experience are indistinguishable from each other.

      Planes are designed for flying and you don't need wheels or doors to fly, but without them the plane isn't very valuable as it can't get off the ground. Each part of the plane is essential.

      I would highly recommend investing resources in making sure onboarding is represented in the product before the "cake is fully baked" and save yourself a lot of 11th-hour hassle down the road.

      • MB

        Morgan Brown

        over 3 years ago #

        Totally - I guess one of the things I get asked about is How much effort should we put toward growth, how much toward onboarding, how we pull resources to put on those teams vs. other competing priorities.

        I know that James Currier has said that in game development they have a rule of thumb of investing a third of development resources (or more) to the first time user game experience.

        I wasn't sure if you prescribed to some general rule like that or not.

        • SH

          Samuel Hulick

          over 3 years ago #

          I don't have a hard and fast rule, but my assumption is that most any product team is investing criminally low amounts of effort in onboarding. I'm biased, of course, but if you look at your customer acquisition/retention funnel, it's often a trice to make a case for more investment in the onboarding phase.

  • PT

    Peter Thomson

    over 3 years ago #

    For companies that have a lot of information needed for signup/onboarding (like financial services and online investing), do you prefer putting everything on one page as a giant form or to break it up into multiple steps. I'd normally like a nice seamless multi-step onboarding flow but for online investing we need so much information that a multi-step process feels like it will never end. Which way do you lean?

    • SH

      Samuel Hulick

      over 3 years ago #

      I lean way towards multi-step. Whenever asking for information from a user, I filter every decision through a lens of "can this credibly be represented as being to the user's benefit in providing this?" That takes time and explanation to communicate the relevance, and huge forms just can't do that.

      Regarding the "feels like it will never end" part, you can tackle that problem independently by setting expectations at the beginning ("This will take N minutes to complete"), demonstrating progress ("page 2 of 5", "60% complete", etc.), and allowing convenient exit points where people can pick things up in a follow-up visit.

      • ES

        Elena S

        over 3 years ago #

        I just did my taxes through TurboTax and they did a fantastic job of breaking the process down into multiple stages and concisely explaining the reason for each step within each stage. Colour me impressed.

  • BC

    Benji Chunch

    over 3 years ago #

    Samuel,

    Love your site. Well done, brother.

    Recently I have started to think about how there are many different IRL experiences that include “onboarding”: anything from finding a cart at an unfamiliar grocery store to making love to with a new partner to listening to an album for the first time. Just like user onboarding for a product, designing these experiences requires openness and a “beginner’s mind.”

    My question: do you find that you do teardowns of real world experiences as you live them? If so, can you give an example of one that comes to mind? Bonus points if they involve sex, drugs, rock'n'roll, or grocery stores.

    Thanks!
    Benji

    • SH

      Samuel Hulick

      over 3 years ago #

      Well, if this isn't the most interesting question!

      And actually, yes, I totally review IRL "activation" experiences as I encounter them.

      One recent example was taking my family to an AirBnB cabin for some weekend R&R. We saw on the property profile that it had a really nice fireplace, and a hot tub, etc.

      In software terms, once we booked it we were in "post-acquisition, pre-activation" mode. That's to say, we were committed to trying it out and had an expectation of what kind of value it would provide, but hadn't directly experienced it yet.

      Upon arriving, we found the aforementioned "activation" experience to be pretty troublesome. To start with, it was super cold inside and we had to have a lengthy and chilly search for the thermostat, which wasn't mentioned in the welcome one-sheet they provided.

      Once that was out of the way, it seemed like a great time to build a fire. However, while the firewood WAS listed in the one-sheet as being in an outdoor storage unit, there was no mention of where to find the key that unlocked it, nor was there a mention of where to find a lighter.

      Stymied, we decided to move on to the hot tub. It turned out that the water was pretty green and slightly smelly, so we once again returned to the manual that made mention of adding some chemical tablets if the water was stale. However, there was zero mention of how many, or of what, or where to find them.

      Instead of having a relaxing family time in front of a fire or under the stars in a hot tub, we were led on an hours-long wild goose chase filled with missing information, oversights in the overall experience, and a lack of attention throughout.

      We eventually got everything figured out and had a great rest of our weekend, but for the first couple hours I was just walking around thinking "jeez this onboarding sucks".

      • HW

        Hannah Wright

        over 3 years ago #

        That's a great story.

        The owner of that place probably thought those issues were so small that they weren't worth mentioning, just like someone with an app might think, "My app makes perfect sense to me—so it must make total sense to others, too."

      • RO

        Ryan O'Donnell

        over 3 years ago #

        The upside is that your family will be telling that story for years and it will only get funnier.

  • LM

    Lyle McKeany

    over 3 years ago #

    Hi @samuelhulick!

    With your vast experience doing onboarding teardowns, have you noticed any significant differences or interesting similarities in effective onboarding flows for B2B vs B2C products?

    • SH

      Samuel Hulick

      over 3 years ago #

      The biggest difference I've seen between B2B & B2C is that B2B can afford to throw more warm bodies at a given signup. Having a more hands-on (read: concierge) onboarding experience can have a very easily-justifiable ROI for a business customer with a $5k LTV, but you could never make a profit giving a white-glove treatment to, say, signups for a social media network.

      And Enterprise is a COMPLETELY different beast entirely.

  • ES

    Eli Sklairn

    over 3 years ago #

    Hey Samuel I have two questions:

    What is the most overlooked part of the onboarding process?

    What is one area where companies most often (knowingly or unknowingly) insert friction in the process?

    • SH

      Samuel Hulick

      over 3 years ago #

      "What is the most overlooked part of the onboarding process?"

      I would say that Lifecycle Emails are BY FAR the most-ignored, highest-leverage part of the onboarding experience to focus on.

      I wrote a ton more on 'em here: http://www.helpscout.net/blog/lifecycle-emails/

    • SH

      Samuel Hulick

      over 3 years ago #

      "What is one area where companies most often (knowingly or unknowingly) insert friction in the process?"

      Tripping over themselves to explain everything. Instead of freezing up progress while you go on and on about yourself, just create a product that requires little to no explanation to get value out of it.

  • FH

    Farron Hicks

    over 3 years ago #

    Hey @samuelhulick ! Big fan of your site! Thanks for doing the AMA. Building off of @elitrybaker-com's question around friction, I’m also curious about this. Specifically, have you noticed a common theme where friction is the most prevalent during onboarding with SaaS based companies?

    • SH

      Samuel Hulick

      over 3 years ago #

      Email confirmation definitely stands out. I have yet to come across a great reason to take all the momentum a new signup is bringing to the experience and tell them to go into the distraction nightmare of their inbox instead of progressing further into the product.

      Another big one is designing for/around natural roadblocks like the processing time it takes to upload a video, or getting a developer to install a snippet in the footer of their product, or waiting for an integration to sync. Whenever someone hits a stopping point, try to guide their momentum to another relevant activity rather than simply telling them to come back later.

      • SC

        Steven Cox

        over 3 years ago #

        Fantastic AMA! Appreciate it.

      • TX

        Tony Xiao

        almost 3 years ago #

        Slack stands out here as one product that blocks you from moving forward until after you have confirmed your email address. Why does slack still earn an A+ for user onboarding?

  • ES

    Elena S

    over 3 years ago #

    Hi Sam! Thanks for doing this AMA.

    First off - I love your teardowns, the educational paired with the hilarious is a great combo. My question is pretty simple - who are your greatest teachers?

  • ZD

    Zach Duckworth

    over 3 years ago #

    Thank you @SamuelHulick for doing this AMA. Loving your feedback so far!

    My company is currently in a pre-launch phase for a new app coming out this June . I was wondering if you had any good examples of companies that were able to successfully acquire qualified users during their pre-launch and then were able to educate them about the value of the product without annoying them (too many email blasts, etc..) in order to create a seamless transition and high retention rate once the real product launched.

    Also, do you have any good examples of companies that were able to politely suggest to specific user segments that the product wasn't for them? For example, if I'm designing a fitness app for a regular person I wouldn't want a super buff gym rat using my app since they wouldn't find value in it and would probably rate it poorly.

    Thank you!!

    • VK

      Vishal Kataria

      over 3 years ago #

      Hi @zachduck , here is a link that may offer answers to your first question:

      http://www.reddit.com/r/Entrepreneur/comments/2clqa3/how_startups_such_as_dropbox_airbnb_groupon_and/

      Hope it helps...

    • SH

      Samuel Hulick

      over 3 years ago #

      Those are both super solid questions, but I don't have a great answer for either.

      I wish there were a lot more case studies out there for onboarding in general, and finding ones touching on pre-launch onboarding specifically has been pretty difficult.

      As for the "it's not you, it's me" rejection, it's something I've considered for a while but haven't seen in the wild. I imagine most product teams are having a hard enough time keeping up with the user experience for people who DO belong to begin with.

      I'd love to see examples of the latter if you or anyone else here would care to share, though!

      • DD

        Dan Dascalescu

        over 3 years ago #

        A common tagline I've seen for company that want to target average users rather than pros is "For the rest of us".

  • CA

    Casey Armstrong

    over 3 years ago #

    Hey @samuelhulick -- I posted in the wrong thread earlier, but...

    I know you look all around to draw inspiration for onboarding users/customers/etc. What are some offline examples that you study and believe others should think about when designing their onboarding? And why?

  • SH

    Suresh H

    over 3 years ago #

    Thanks @samuelhulick for this AMA. B2B products are generally messy - it requires you to go integrate some code on your app/website, or get someone else do an approval. Have you seen any good examples of on-boarding for such apps?

  • AA

    Anuj Adhiya

    over 3 years ago #

    HI @samuelhulick - this is so cool of you!
    From all the teardowns you've done, do you now see a pattern in terms of what apps are getting right and/or continue to get wrong?

    • SH

      Samuel Hulick

      over 3 years ago #

      Sure! I've seen tons of them.

      The most general pattern I've noticed is that it's getting easier and easier to tell apart the products who fully incorporated onboarding into their product/feature design process vs the ones who tacked on something haphazard right before launching. Be the former, not the latter!

  • JP

    Jason Pittam

    over 3 years ago #

    No questions. Just wanted to say thanks for sharing. Great questions and answers are insightful.

  • DC

    David Custódio

    over 3 years ago #

    Hi @samuelhulick !
    What do you think is a best approach for user onboarding:
    - Show the user what he can do (like a tour)
    or
    - Ask the user what he wants to do (like a wizard)

    • SH

      Samuel Hulick

      over 3 years ago #

      I would say neither -- get the user to actually do the most substantial thing your product can offer. When in doubt, cut the chit chat and hit the ground running.

  • SH

    Suresh H

    over 3 years ago #

    Another question: if you were to summarize the goal for an on-boarding process, what would that be? Ideally, i'd love for the on-boarding to leave the user see the value of the product, so they can come back. But are there other goals one could aim for?

  • DL

    Dylan La Com

    over 3 years ago #

    What's up @samuelhulick! Awesome AMA.

    Are social logins a necessity? And should the email + password combo always be offered?

    • SH

      Samuel Hulick

      over 3 years ago #

      I'm a fan of social logins. Beyond making things easier on the user, they can also provide a ton of extra contextual information about the person signing up.

      I would usually tend to include email/pass as well, but I'd never say never (or, in this case, always).

      If you don't have email/pass, then you better be sure that your audience is VERY well-represented on whatever social login platforms you're integrating with.

  • SE

    Sean Ellis

    over 3 years ago #

    Thank you Samuel - amazing AMA! Your ability to stay articulate and type really quickly is off the charts.

    • SH

      Samuel Hulick

      over 3 years ago #

      It was a genuine pleasure! If anyone has any more questions, keep them coming; I will keep checking throughout the rest of the day.

  • FP

    Federico Pascual

    over 3 years ago #

    Hi Samuel, big fan here! Love your tear downs. Thanks for doing this AMA, I have a few questions if you don't mind:

    - What is your user onboarding stack? What tools are must haves for on boarding?

    - Whats your opinion on Intercom?

    - What is your advice regarding achieving a good balance between number of onboarding messages (in-app messages or emails or whatever) vs not annoying your users. It's a really fine line, almost too easy to cross. For example, I feel that there are tons of things that I would like to communicate via onboarding messages to show the value of the product and educate users on how to make the best out of the platform, but I don't want to be annoying. Whats your best advice here? Whats your experience in achieving this sweet spot?

    - Whats is your advice for onboarding on APIs or platforms aimed for developers? For example, onboarding for platforms like Twilio, Stripe, Braintree, Github, Mandrill, Sentry and Heroku?

    - What are the key skills to be an expert in user onboarding?

    - What are some of the things you learned that could be only learned through experience? Things that could be very difficult to learn by other means? (related to user onboarding).

    - What is the best way to contact you? Would love to have a chat!

    Thanks very much!

    • SH

      Samuel Hulick

      over 3 years ago #

      "What is your advice regarding achieving a good balance between number of onboarding messages (in-app messages or emails or whatever) vs not annoying your users"

      I think people are way, way too hesitant to send out lifecycle emails.

      So long as you're sending emails that people like getting -- ones that are genuinely cheerful, helpful, and relevant -- then you don't have to worry about harassing people, because... you won't be.

    • SH

      Samuel Hulick

      over 3 years ago #

      "What is your user onboarding stack? What tools are must haves for on boarding?"

      I don't really have one. As a consultant/designer, every team I work with has a different combination of tools on hand.

      I'm not a huge fan of the onboarding-specific software currently on the market, and am actually developing an offering of my own right now because of it.

    • SH

      Samuel Hulick

      over 3 years ago #

      "Whats your opinion on Intercom?"

      I think they have a wonderful product that has multiple solid use cases. Big fan.

    • SH

      Samuel Hulick

      over 3 years ago #

      "What is the best way to contact you? Would love to have a chat!"

      UserOnboard.com/contact/ !

      • DD

        Dan Dascalescu

        over 3 years ago #

        > What are the key skills to be an expert in user onboarding?

        I assume they'd include empathy and being able to adopt a beginner's mindset?

  • ND

    Nichole Elizabeth DeMeré

    over 3 years ago #

    Hi @samuelhulick!

    "Most people think in terms of 'functional' or technical onboarding; getting their customers and users to go through the motions to get 'up-and-running' with their product rather than equating onboarding with a value delivery milestone." - @lincolnmurphy
    http://sixteenventures.com/customer-onboarding

    What are some examples of companies that have been awesome at accomplishing the latter? They know what customer success means to their customer, they've focus on time to first value, and their onboarding process reflects that?

  • DJ

    David Johnson-Igra

    over 3 years ago #

    Hey @UserOnboard,

    Thank you for taking the time to do this AMA. Very excited to hear about this, as we’re currently redesigning our website and our onboarding process on web.

    My question for you is: can different channels (email, social, push notifications, etc) be effectively used to onboard new users and if so, do you have any particular examples you found successful? What are two key takeaways that you've seen from successful drip marketing campaigns?

    Obviously, step one is teaching a new visitor the value of your service straight out the gate when they land on your page. However, we are just beginning to experiment with drip marketing to help teach the value of our service using trigger emails to guide them as they complete steps. To preface, I work for an online radio company that has a UGC model and in turn, has social components (comments, liking, following, etc.).

    Thanks again!

    David

    • SH

      Samuel Hulick

      over 3 years ago #

      I'd go so far as to say that follow-up channels not only CAN be effectively used for onboarding, but are probably in fact required. I've said in the past that onboarding is about "getting them back, not setting them up" and that by definition requires multiple visits.

      The best way I know to reliably bring people back into your product is via timely, relevant, cheerful, and helpful lifecycle emails. I haven't seen a ton of successful stories about social media used in that way, but I'm sure it could work as well.

  • ND

    Nichole Elizabeth DeMeré

    over 3 years ago #

    Also, to quote @lincolnmurphy again:

    "When I talk to someone about optimizing their SaaS Free Trial for more conversions, as an example, I ask them what a successful Free Trial looks like for their prospect. And no… it’s not 'they convert to a paying customer.'

    That’s YOUR definition of success; don’t confuse that with THEIR definition of success."

    http://sixteenventures.com/customer-onboarding

    What are some ways that you've trained SaaS companies to understand that their onboarding success isn't necessarily the same as their customer's onboarding success?

    • SH

      Samuel Hulick

      over 3 years ago #

      There's a good reason you've quote Lincoln twice -- he's a super smart dude! I've learned so much from reading his awesome material.

      The best way I've found to get people to wrap their heads around the "you're delivering a better person, not a product" concept has been to personally walk clients through the image in this post: http://www.useronboard.com/features-vs-benefits/

  • BC

    Brian Craig

    over 3 years ago #

    Sam, thanks for sharing your expertise today. Contrasting onboarding for Mobile vs. Web, what would you say the most important principles and practices are for onboarding into a mobile app?

    • SH

      Samuel Hulick

      over 3 years ago #

      My thought on mobile vs. web has always been akin to "poetry vs. prose" -- it has to be a really compressed, elegant experience. Ideally the web experience can be held to the same high regard, but it seems like there's a little more room for error there.

      The other main thing to keep in mind with mobile is that even though the screen size is more constrained, you also have a lot more capabilities at your disposal (camera, contact list, etc.). Use those to your (and your users') advantage whenever possible!

  • SE

    Sean Ellis

    over 3 years ago #

    Another question... For onboarding, what do you think is the right balance between intuition of an expert and testing/iterating for best conversion performance? Are there risks with doing a lot of testing around elements of your onboarding?

    • SH

      Samuel Hulick

      over 3 years ago #

      I'm highly mistrustful of "experts" who don't practice iterative, empirical design. Also, a lot of so-called "best practices" could simply be a bad fit for any given business' market/product, so I find it's always best to take a "hypothesize, try, and find out" approach.

      Fortunately, onboarding is perhaps THE best in-app experience to run split tests on. For one thing, the users are by definition new to the app, so there's no familiarity bias to take into consideration (e.g. moving a commonly-used button to a different screen, etc.).

      It's also the highest-volume segment of the product audience, since everyone goes through the activation process but not all of them stick around.

      Lastly, it's a moment in the customer acquisition lifecycle that's especially rich in insights, as it's right in that sweet spot between "thinking about signing up" and "signed up a long time ago". In the former case, they're still just speculating on whether they will find your offering valuable, and in the latter they're already on autopilot.

      If you want to test messaging, priority of activities, time to value, etc., onboarding is your best bet.

  • JS

    Jason Skowronski

    over 3 years ago #

    What are good ways to prompt a user to take a recommended action that would make them more successful? I know you mentioned tooltip tours can be a flow blocker, but what if they are used to highlight something they *should* do? Checklists are another option, but they don't highlight exactly where a particular feature is. Are there other good options?

    • SH

      Samuel Hulick

      over 3 years ago #

      I'm a huge fan of progress trackers like to-do lists, progress meters, etc.

      If your product has a discoverability problem to the point where you recommend someone, say, upload a profile photo and they have no idea where to do that without you literally pointing them there, then that's a usability problem with your product, not an onboarding one.

  • IK

    Ivan Kirigin

    over 3 years ago #

    Sometimes there are different roles that have a part to play. For YesGraph's API, you have engineers implementing, management needing to hit their growth goals, marketers that might be in charge of getting new users but still need engineers.

    How do you test and filter experiences here? It would be great to not have different versions of an experience, but people have different needs, potential objections, etc.

    • SH

      Samuel Hulick

      over 3 years ago #

      I'm a big fan of customized/segmented to-do lists for different user types. That obviates any discoverability problems for the highest-priority activities for any given user group, and allows rapid testing/iteration around the actions listed, their sequence, etc.

      Also, there's significant opportunity for lifecycle emails for each different segment for the long-haul onboarding.

      Am I answering your question correctly or am I misinterpreting it?

      • IK

        Ivan Kirigin

        over 3 years ago #

        How do you know which segment someone is in? Just ask?

        • SH

          Samuel Hulick

          over 3 years ago #

          You can, but that's a last resort imo. I'd much prefer to gather that data passively whenever possible.

          For example, if you want to segment by "original team members" vs. "invitees" and the invitees arrive via an email invitation, you can very easily include a GET variable in the invitation link that lets your system know they're coming from an invite.

          Of course, if your user acquisition funnel makes use of segmented ads or landing pages, that makes things super easy, as well.

  • GH

    Grant Harris

    over 3 years ago #

    Hey there Samuel, I'm curious as to why you consider Tooltip tours "flow-blockers". I always figured they kept the user engaged while helping guide them through the more important parts of your product. I'd love to hear your thoughts on this.

    • SH

      Samuel Hulick

      over 3 years ago #

      I'm not 100% opposed to tooltips when they're guiding an activity, but I find that most of the time they're simply pointing out difference parts of an interface and essentially saying "The 'Create Project' button creates a project".

      I much prefer getting people to learn by doing rather than by rote instruction, and tooltips have a real tendency to inhabit the latter.

      Check out this (awesome) breakdown of the first level of Super Mario Bros. and notice how the designers give you so much instruction with absolutely zero words or interruptions: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZH2wGpEZVgE

      Then contrast that with imagining a version where they're constantly popping things up saying "press B to jump!" and "watch out for goombas!" and "coins are good -- get them!" etc.

      • GH

        Grant Harris

        over 3 years ago #

        I'm working on trying to add "Discoverable tooltips" to our product. So a mixture of "learning by doing", while not mindlessly pointing the user at things. I will check out your video above :) Thanks for the reply!

      • SC

        Steven Chabot

        over 3 years ago #

        I think the gamification aspect is really important. Give me some quick tutorials with tasks I have to complete. Leave me to figure it out, but give me a hint if necessary.

  • GF

    Gregg Fidan

    over 3 years ago #

    What are your favorite examples of mobile app onboarding?

  • JE

    jonah engler

    over 3 years ago #

    "Please feel free to ask me ANYTHING."
    What is the meaning of life?

  • YS

    Yair Spolter

    over 3 years ago #

    Hi @samuelhulick ,

    Thanks for the really clear and actionable insights.
    We're considering taking out the "password" field from our signup forms (requiring only email), but this would require the user to create a password at some later time if they wanted to sign in via email again (there are a number of ways that we can approach that).

    On the one hand, this would make the signup process more seamless potentially increasing signups. Once we have their email, we can bring users back to the site On the other hand, it adds friction to the next sign-in, which might be an obstacle to retention.

    Which way would you advise to go?

  • YS

    Yair Spolter

    over 3 years ago #

    Hi @samuelhulick ,

    Thanks for the really clear and actionable insights.
    We're considering taking out the "password" field from our signup forms (requiring only email), but this would require the user to create a password at some later time if they wanted to sign in via email again (there are a number of ways that we can approach that).

    On the one hand, this would make the signup process more seamless potentially increasing signups. Once we have their email, we can bring users back to the site On the other hand, it adds friction to the next sign-in, which might be an obstacle to retention.

    Which way would you advise to go?

  • IK

    Ingmar K

    over 3 years ago #

    Hey Samuel,

    one thing you want to achieve with onboarding is to engage and retain customers in a sustainable way. On the other hand attention of users might be very limited when using the product for the first time.

    What are your experiences when it comes to the trade off between an onboarding related increasement of bounce rates and achieving a higher engagement rate for onboarded users?

    Best
    Ingmar

  • JE

    jonah engler

    over 3 years ago #

    Thank you so much, greatly appreciated!

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