Leave a comment
Get the GH Bookmarklet

AMAs

Iris Shoor is the Co-founder and VP marketing of Takipi, a start-up company solving one of cloud computing's toughest problems - finding out when and why code breaks in production. While working with traditional B2B companies, Takipi manages to generate more than 90% of the leads from content marketing and growth hacking. The Takipi blog, a technical blog for developers, has more than 100K unique visitors per month and is one of the top 5 Java blogs.

Previously she was the co-founder and VP Product at VisualTao, a Sequoia backed start-up company developing cloud technologies for engineering and design. She was also the Sr.Product Line Manager for the new AutoCAD web and mobile product line following VisualTao's acquisition by Autodesk Inc (ADSK).

Among other growth topics, if you have questions on B2B growth hacking, Iris is your person.

She writes (and sometime guest-post) on creative marketing on her personal blog at www.startupmoon.com

You can also follow her at @irisshoor 

  • MB

    Morgan Brown

    over 2 years ago #

    Hey Iris, thanks so much for doing this. Can you talk about how you've developed some of your innovative content pieces and advice you have for others on doing so?

    Your games and data driven pieces are particularly impressive - I'm sure people would love to know how to pull stuff like that off!

    • IS

      Iris Shoor

      over 2 years ago #

      Thanks Morgan!

      I always think of content marketing as any type of content which our users are interested at, not just blog posts. It’s much easier to attract audience to ‘fun’ content - such as games, lists, etc. Unlike blog posts which can relate more easily to the product, with these projects it’s more challenging. I try to collect emails addresses and to use retargeting on this audience.

      The main two advantages of ‘fun’ content over standard blog posts :

      1). Easier to bring traffic. Since it’s usually a ‘mini product’ you can also publish the project on Product Hunt and similar websites for new apps.
      2). Unlike blogs posts, these websites usually have an evergreen, steady traffic.

      Here are some examples of unique content we created :

      Java is cool - list of all the influencers, blogs, newsletters and podcasts in the Java world. www.javais.cool/
      Java deathmatch - trivia game for Java developers. Over 30,000 players on the first month. javadeathmatch.com/

      Java calendar - all Java events -www.java2014.org/january

      Tip : This type of project doesn’t require your R&D team resources (which are usually unavailable). We outsources most of these projects. The cost per project is around $200-500. You can use coders from Upwork, CodersClan, Crew.co and other services.

      • MB

        Morgan Brown

        over 2 years ago #

        Thanks Iris, super-helpful. Can you share a bit about your content ideation process?

        Obviously investing in creating a game takes time, so you want to make sure it's worth it.

        How do you go about it?

  • SP

    Steven Pesavento

    over 2 years ago #

    Hi Iris, thank you for sharing your time.

    In addition to creating beautiful content; what channels have you found that have over delivered or under delivered on your expectations?

    I'm really interested in understanding what worked well or didn't work, and overall what did you learn in the process.

    • IS

      Iris Shoor

      over 2 years ago #

      Hi Steven and thanks, happy to be here.

      My main focus when creating our content marketing strategy was to find out quickly which channels work well and which don’t.

      Here are my main takeaways :

      The blog should have a clear focus. Choose one subject and develop an eco-system around it. Only when you reach a sustainable audience start adding more topics.
      Write long and in-depth posts. I believe each post should be absolutely great. In the B2B world, we usually get 10-20K visitors to a great post and about 1-5K visitors to a mediocre one. So, it’s worth putting more effort into less posts.
      Most of your traffic should be organic. I believe content marketing is the new SEO and the new way to get an organic traffic. Don’t invest too much time on optimizing the post itself for Google or building links - it doesn’t create a huge difference when dealing with content marketing. Instead, finds topics which people look for. Tutorials, tips, case studies, samples.
      Post topics which usually work very well : list of tools or compression between different tools, benchmarks or researches - backed by numbers, long lists (72 tip to boost your…, 35 A/B tests you must test, etc), tutorial/ how to on a new topic, case studies with interesting companies.

      What didn’t work : personal opinion posts, covering the same topics other do, writing very niche posts (I’d expected it to get less traffic but get the right prospects, instead it brought low traffic with zero conversations), ‘filler’ posts (like : best posts from last month, great presentations for Java devs, etc).
      Another channel which didn’t work well is HackerNews - we got tons of traffic for some posts (20-50K) but hardly any conversations and it really affected the overall bounce rate.

      • SP

        Steven Pesavento

        over 2 years ago #

        Hi Iris, Thanks so much for your answers. I think that will be really helpful to a ton of people.

      • SC

        STACK CRM

        over 2 years ago #

        I am not sure that strategy works Iris - with respect. If you have a following and an audience then you can write content for content's sake. But what would you do with a clean slate?

  • AB

    Avadhoot Bhambare

    over 2 years ago #

    Hi Iris, Can you please tell us in your experience how the B2B user acquisition techniques differ than those in B2C realm?

    • IS

      Iris Shoor

      over 2 years ago #

      Hi Avadhoot,
      The way I see it, the main differences between B2C to B2B growth hacking are :

      1). You usually target a much smaller audience
      2). Cost per lead is much higher
      3). Since you’re handling a smaller number of leads you can contact leads directly, sometimes in creative ways.

      Here are some examples of growth hacks which usually work better for B2B :

      1). Reaching a very targeted audience (for example : Hadoop audience) - I like to create content marketing around this topic, usually 2-3 interesting posts. Later on to take all the visitors to those posts and retarget them on Facebook and Twitter. Other tactics can be creating gated content or mapping all companies which use a certain technology using tools like ‘build with’ and advertising based on a company name (Facebook/ LinkedIn).

      2). You can invest in mini-projects like small apps, calendars, games, etc even if it brings small number of leads.
      3). Try using creative personal emails to leads with high potential. You can see some examples here : http://www.startupmoon.com/the-email-templates-that-got-50-of-our-users-to-answer/

      Check out this post for the complete list of B2B hacks : http://www.startupmoon.com/29-b2b-growth-hacks-the-ultimate-list/

    • MD

      Matt Diederichs

      over 2 years ago #

      +1 to this!

  • PL

    Pierre Lechelle

    over 2 years ago #

    Hey Iris, Can you give us a few hints about how do you Distribute your Content? Do you have a specific process or tactics you could share?

    When launching out a Content Marketing strategy, what would be your timeline to expect the first results?

    • IS

      Iris Shoor

      over 2 years ago #

      Hi Pierre,

      I believe that knowing how to distribute your content is as important as writing good content. The time investment ratio should be 1:1 - if you worked on a post for one day - invest one day in distributing it.

      You can read the complete guide to content marketing distribution here : www.startupmoon.com/distributing-content-marketing-the-complete-guide

      Some important tips :

      Spend some time researching distribution channels of content similar to your. The first step in building a strategy is knowing which channels work for others. Follow other successful blogs which target a similar audience to yours - see on which social network they get the most shares. Google the title and see other websites which republished the content. Use SimilarWeb or other tools to see where they get their traffic from.
      Maintain a well organized list of all the channels which brought you traffic in the past : tweets by influencers, newsletters you were featured on, websites which republished your posts, LinkedIn groups, etc. For each post - go over the list and see which channels are a good fit for it. We have a list of 50 influencers who wrote about us in the past, on each new post we approach the top 2-3 influencers which are related to the post’s topic and ask them to tweet about it.
      Prefer channels which bring steady traffic over channels which create traffic peaks. Even if you’ll get the same number of visitors, the visitors from traffic peaks usually don’t convert as well. Examples for steady traffic sources : organic traffic, links on Quora or other Q&A websites, links on Wikipedia.
      You can read more about best practices of distributing your traffic on Reddit, Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, republishing and guest posting on the article above.

  • MD

    Matt Diederichs

    over 2 years ago #

    Hi Iris!

    Curious what types of content you've found to perform the best for large Enterprise lead gen (blog, whitepapers, webinars, etc)?

    Follow-up to that, what channel have you found best for distributing those content pieces to targeted audiences?

    • IS

      Iris Shoor

      over 2 years ago #

      This is a great question. For a long time I’ve been told that a low touch approach can’t work for the enterprise. We’ve managed to get installations of Takipi from companies like Intel, eBay, Samsung, Wallmart directly from our blog without contacting them.

      The content which works best for enterprises is without a doubt post which cover different tools and especially compare between different tools. Most decision makers at enterprises will often compare their current technology to a new and ‘buzzy’ one.

      For example : this post where we compare between New Relic and AppDynamic is one of our best converting post. http://blog.takipi.com/appdynamics-vs-new-relic-which-tool-is-right-for-you-the-complete-guide

      We cover both product in depth and then explain how Takipi boosts each one of them. So what we actually do is piggybacking on searches of decision makers and market Takipi there.

      Here’s another example of covering a good mix of old vs new tools and adding Takipi as well : http://blog.takipi.com/7-monitoring-tools-to-prevent-the-next-doomsday/

      As for the distribution channel - most traffic to those posts is organic. We also ask the companies we cover their products to share it and then reach their audience (Enterprise companies!). One thing that worked well is creating an eBook with all the tools by sections and asking users to leave their details in order to download it. We promoted the eBook based on retargeting of visitors to posts about tools (Facebook and Twitter ads). You can also promote this content on Facebook and LinkedIn based on the companies people work at. If you have a list of about 50 enterprise companies you want to reach out to you can get to a really targeted audience on LinkedIn with a pretty low budget.

  • JB

    Jon Bishop

    over 2 years ago #

    Hey Iris, it's great to hear about your Java blog! We currently have about 55k uniques coming to our SQL blog and I'd love to make that 100k. :)

    What type of posts have performed the best for you? (long vs. short, breaking java news vs. more evergreen content, etc.)

    Also, how do you decide what to write about next?

    • IS

      Iris Shoor

      over 2 years ago #

      Hi Jon,

      Thanks and great to hear your SQL blog is doing so well.

      Content types which worked very well for us :

      1). Long vs. short - I prefer long posts (1500-2000 words). They usually get more shares and Google likes them better. For SEO reasons I also like including some embedded content such as SlideShare presentations, videos, etc.

      2). Breaking news didn’t work very well for us. Lots of competition and these posts usually get high traffic only for a few days, I prefer evergreen content.

      3). Posts about different tools always get great traffic and convert very well. List are always great (10 new tools Java developers should know, 8 tools to use after deploying a new version). I include Takipi as one of the tools. I also ask the other companies I mention to tweet and share the post, it’s a great source for super relevant audience. Product X vs. Product Y always performs great.

      4). Benchmark or research based on numbers. For example - The Top 100 Scala Libraries in 2015 – Based on 64,562 GitHub Libraries. Sometime we outsource the data collection and analysis to save some time.
      5). Tutorials and ‘How to’s.

      6). Any posts with a negative theme (I wish it wouldn’t be like it, but it is) - “The dark side of Lambda expressions”, “Why you shouldn’t move to Docker”, etc.

      7). Case studies and articles about interesting companies - “How Twitter handles 2,144,777 requests per second”
      Here’s a list of our top 10 posts, the most converting ones are those which cover different tools. http://blog.takipi.com/takipi-blog-top-10-posts-of-all-time/

      • JB

        Jon Bishop

        over 2 years ago #

        Thank you Iris! I really like the tool list and research posts (especially since we're a data tool and could create some cool charts for them).

        I showed our engineers http://www.javadeathmatch.com/ and they're already brainstorming SQL games :)

  • SE

    Sean Ellis

    over 2 years ago #

    Hi Iris, thanks for doing an AMA with us! I noticed that Israel seems to have a strong emerging growth community. Who are a couple growth people you respect most there and what are their backgrounds? Part of the reason I'm asking is that I'm in the early stages of planning a speaking trip to Israel (likely late November) and would love to have some insights about the ecosystem there.

    • IS

      Iris Shoor

      over 2 years ago #

      Hi Sean!

      Wow, great to hear you’ll be visiting Israel, looking forward! I’m sure you’d enjoy it.

      There’s a great eco-system of growth hackers in Israel. I believe it’s mainly for two reasons : many of the marketers here have technical background, it really helps them to be more analytic and create unique hacks which require coding. I give talks in Israel of ‘Growth hacking for developers’. The second reason - most of the gambling and forex companies are from Israel. I’m not for it and personally don’t work with those companies, but, they were practicing growth hacking before everyone - coming up with creative ways to acquire users and measuring e-v-e-r-y-t-h-i-n-g- they do. When people with this marketing education join standard B2C/ B2B companies it boosts the marketing.

      The thing I’d like to see changing at the Israeli community is to have them write and blog more. It’s not that they don’t want to share, but blogging about the amazing hacks they do is still not part of the DNA.

      My top growth hackers (sorry if I forgot someone) :

      Roy Povarchik - http://roy.roypovarchik.com/

      Talia Wolf - www.conversioner.com/conversion-optimization-blog

      Avishai Sam Bitton - @Avishai_Bitton

      Jonathan Nimrodi (PlayBuzz) -www.cookiejarmarketing.com

      Dan peguine - @danpeguine

      Ben Lang, Mapped in Israel

      Omer Shai, VP marketing at Wix

      Tal Siech, co-founder at Visual.ly

      Dori Harpaz, VP marketing, Incapsula

      Natahsa Shine-Zirkel, VP marketing at Rounds

      Yael Kochman, @Yaelkochman

  • JS

    Jared Smith

    over 2 years ago #

    What’s the one thing that someone reading this AMA could/should take away apply to their own startup?

    • IS

      Iris Shoor

      over 2 years ago #

      Hi Jared.

      Hard one :) I’d say it’s that mastering content marketing is all about being able to analyze existing content. People tend to think that in order to create a great blog you need to write well. We don’t have any ‘writer’ and all the people who manage the blog are not developers. I was in charge of creating the strategy without having background in development.

      The key to successful content marketing is analyzing what’s working well and knowing how to distribute it.

  • DL

    Dylan La Com

    over 2 years ago #

    Great to have you on Iris!

    What’s the biggest mistake you see most startups make when analyzing qualitative data?

    • IS

      Iris Shoor

      over 2 years ago #

      Hi Dylan

      It’s probably reading data in context. I didn’t find any tool yet which shows data as part of the full funnel. What exactly was the path of each user, which A/B tests ran when this data was taken, how is the data affected by weekends and holidays. Many times, especially in a B2B product where the number of users is not huge, I’m not sure I compare the right data set.

  • AF

    Arran Ferguson

    over 2 years ago #

    I want to use Content marketing as a marketing strategy but i have trouble knowing how to start and what to do. Is there any simple instructions you can offer?

    • IS

      Iris Shoor

      over 2 years ago #

      Hi Arran, great question. I think it’s super important to invest time in research before you start producing content marketing. Most people start with a blog, write about topics they know well and then try to figure out how to attract readers. It usually doesn’t work.

      I’d follow the following steps :

      1). Create a list of 10-20 blogs which target the same audience as your. Try to include a few company blogs as well.

      2). Try to map the most popular content. In most cases you can’t see how many people read each post but you can see how many social shares it got which is a good indication to how popular it is. You can use QuickSprout to see all the pages under a certain domain sorted by the number of shares. You can also use http://buzzsumo.com/ to see which posts on topics you plan to cover are most trending.

      3). Based on this research decide what are the topics you’d cover. For example, I learned from my research, 3 years ago, benchmarks of interesting technologies perform very well. The first post we published was called the “EC2 olympics” where we uncovered some very interesting stats about EC2 speed between different locations.

      4). Try mapping the distribution of the successful posts : which social network works best for them (I decided based on my research to focus only on Twitter at first), which voting websites they use (when I created the initial audience to our blog I asked myself which posts will perform best on Reddit and HackerNews), on which places they republish their content.

      You can read more about this process here : http://www.startupmoon.com/reverse-engineering-marketing-where-do-other-sites-get-their-traffic/

      Even though it sounds like lots of work the research shouldn’t take you longer than 1-2 weeks.

  • JC

    Jeremy Cabral

    over 2 years ago #

    What do you think is Takipi's competitive advantage?

    • IS

      Iris Shoor

      over 2 years ago #

      Hi Jeremy,

      It’s the only product out there which is really built for production and allows developers to understand how their code performs in real time.

      • AA

        Anuj Adhiya

        over 2 years ago #

        Given the obvious need for such a product - why do you think there aren't more players in this space?

        • IS

          Iris Shoor

          over 2 years ago #

          The technology is super challenging and very low level. However, I'm sure we'll see more players in the future.

  • AB

    Andrew Bridgeman

    over 2 years ago #

    Iris, thank you for doing this AMA!

    My question: How do you move away from outbound lead generation when you have effectively no inbound? (B2B)

    If I may ask a follow-up: how important is it that someone who has worked on the company's product is involved in the decision-making process for growth?

    Thank you again!

    • IS

      Iris Shoor

      over 2 years ago #

      Hi Andrew,

      My Pleasure!

      Outbound vs. Inbound leads - I think it comes down to cost per lead. If you can prove you get high quality leads which cost less than the outbound leads - you win. In order to prove it I don’t think you need a full inbound marketing machine. You can start off with a small blog, eBook, creating a community, etc.

      As for the importance of having someone from the product team involved in creating the growth strategy - it’s a bonus but I think the other way around is more important - you want your growth team to take some product decisions. For example - it’s very important for me that in each new versions will have some features which are easy to market. But, I think that cooperation between the product and growth teams is not a must at the first steps of getting some inbound leads. The first steps should be trying out lots of hacks and see what works, it should come before making product changes.

  • TB

    Tuan Bui Anh

    over 2 years ago #

    Hi Iris,

    Thanks for taking the time for AMA.

    What's actually the "Content Marketing"? Just writing the piece of content is not enough, the next step is "distribution and here we "stuck"...

    Our product is WooCommerce (WordPress) plugin which helps shop owners to increase the conversion rate. In your opinion, what's the best way to organize content marketing with such product?

    Thanks in advance,

    • IS

      Iris Shoor

      over 2 years ago #

      Hi Tuan!

      Content marketing the way I see it is producing every kind of content which interest your audience. It can be a blog, game, app, book, etc.

      It’s main advantages are - it’s replacing traditional SEO (you get people who’re looking for specific words to reach your content), it’s a great way to get high traffic to your website, it’s a great way to create a community and to get people to like your brand.

      Distribution - is as important as writing good content. The time investment ratio should be 1:1, if you spent a day writing a post - spend a day distributing it. You can read more about it on previous questions and here : http://www.startupmoon.com/distributing-content-marketing-the-complete-guide/

      In a nutshell - understand how other blogs similar to your spread their content, create a long list of channels and invest time learning each one.

      Promoting your Wordpress plugin - from the top of my head I’d try :

      1). Write posts which are lists of plug-in for shop owners - like, “10 wordpress plugins which every online shop owner should know”. Choose other plugins for the same audience which don’t compete with yours. Ask them to share the post and to tweet about it.
      2). Write an eBook for online shop owners with practical tips to increase conversion rates.
      3). Create case studies of online shops which increased their conversation rate (not necessarily using your tool). Promote them on communities of online shop owners.

  • VG

    Vinish Garg

    over 2 years ago #

    Hi Iris, at what stage do you really start working with content strategists? Can you share some experience of how marketers and strategists can work together such as for 'voice and tone', or for 'content governance'?

    • IS

      Iris Shoor

      over 2 years ago #

      Hi Vinish,

      I believe it’s highly important to set your content strategy at early stages, otherwise you’ll waste important resources and time.
      Here are the most important things in my opinion :

      1). Choose the initial focus of your content marketing. Writing on too many topics will make it much harder to create an audience and to distribute the content.
      2). Choose the voice and branding of your content. The most important thing for me was to have a strong alignment between the company and the blog. I want our blog visitors to remember Takipi. The challenge is making this connection without being too commercial. We decided to go with illustrations similar to our brand but to hardly use our name or log.
      3). Knowing who your audience is. Probably most important. For example : there’s a huge difference when creating a content strategy to developers vs. DevOps vs. QA. You want to make sure you reach the right audience and the right companies. For example, we hardly cover very new technologies as it’s hardly in use by companies we’re targeting.

  • PB

    Paul Belshaw

    over 2 years ago #

    With most start ups failing within 3 years and only 5% with turnover is excess of £1 million what should social media do to improve matters?

    • IS

      Iris Shoor

      over 2 years ago #

      Hi Paul,

      I believe most entrepreneurs will agree with me that product market fit is the key in creating a successful company. If you have a really great product people need - you nailed it. While most people will say you need to create this amazing product and then market it, I think it the other way around.

      Using social media, growth hacking and marketing helps getting to product market fit. While in the past it used to cost a lot to get users to try your product, using social networks you can get the first users in very low budget. Create a basic product -> get people to use it via growth hacking -> improve the product -> get other people to use it. Repeat it enough times and you’re likely to get to product market fit and have an awesome company. This is a great book about using social media to create the right product or improve an existing one - http://www.amazon.com/Ask-Counterintuitive-Discover-Customers-Business/dp/1939447720

  • MB

    Morgan Brown

    over 2 years ago #

    Hey Iris, another one for you. After you publish or launch a piece of content, do you go back and optimize it further for either improved distribution or improved conversion?

    And if so, how do you think about that, or do you have any examples you could share?

    • IS

      Iris Shoor

      over 2 years ago #

      Hi Morgan,

      Yes, I tend to go back and edit posts.

      Some examples :

      1). The obvious one - changing the title if it didn’t work well.

      2). Reddit and sometimes Twitter users are very sensitive to commercial content. Sometimes we wait a day or two after publishing the post and getting the traffic from Reddit and only then add a paragraph about our product

      3). If you want more social media shares you need to use a certain type of titles and subtitles, for more organic traffic is a different type. Sometimes after the initial traffic peak has ended we change the titles and subtitles to something Google will like better.

    • IS

      Iris Shoor

      over 2 years ago #

      Oh, one other thing we do is going back to old posts, adding some info and republishing them.

      For example, we wrote a successful post about Atom vs. Sublime (two code editors). Every time there’s a new version of one of them we edit the post. Then we republish it with a title which relates to the news, for example : “Atom 2.4 is here - is it the end of Sublime?”

      We use Google alert to track all the news which can relate to past posts.

  • PP

    Paritosh Praharaj

    over 2 years ago #

    Looking forward to the lessons from this AMA.

  • AA

    Anuj Adhiya

    over 2 years ago #

    Hi Iris - super excited for this.

    Could you talk about biggest challenges you’ve encountered with growing Takipi - the company and the blog?

    • IS

      Iris Shoor

      over 2 years ago #

      Hi Anuj,

      I’m super excited as well!

      The biggest challenge I had with growing Takipi was marketing to developers - probably the most sensitive audience to marketing. They hate popups, being reached out to, seeing commercial content on the blogs and especially - leaving their email. For example : I have a pop up window on my personal blog (for marketers) and on the Takipi blog asking users if they want to sign up for blog updates. On the marketing blog 1 of 20 visitors signs up for updates, on the Takipi blog it’s 1 of 170!

      The ways I overcame this challenge :

      1). Using more content marketing and less advertising and other “pushy” marketing methods.
      2). Building a fun and non commercial brand based on illustrations
      3). Developing good relationships with influencers which are super important for developers.

  • AA

    Anuj Adhiya

    over 2 years ago #

    One more: Do you have a particular growth experiment that was either a big win or a big learning experience that you can share with us?

    • IS

      Iris Shoor

      over 2 years ago #

      Hi Anuj -

      Big wins-

      1). I love focusing on small niches. When we first launched Takipi we target the Scala community (small programming language) instead of Java. The product was the same but we called it “Takipi for Scala”. We managed to get to all the influencers, create lots of buzz and get our first few hundreds users. Ever since I love rebranding the same product, each time for a different community.
      2). Another big win was getting leads from conferences without being there. Going to a conference and having a booth start at $15K. We like writing posts about the conference, for example, ask all the speaker to recommend one talk, and get to the audience of the conference just by social media. We ask the speakers to tweet about it and get to all the conference audience. We build a landing page for the conference visitors and even use retargeting. Sometimes we’re able to get 100 qualified leads from a conference, without being there.

      Big learning -

      During the last couple of months I invested time and money trying to use traditional SEO method on our blog in order to increase the organic traffic. It seems like it doesn’t work for organic traffic and the increase was very minor

      • AA

        Anuj Adhiya

        over 2 years ago #

        "Rebranding the same product, each time for a different community" - love that!

  • AA

    Anuj Adhiya

    over 2 years ago #

    One more: Does Takipi have a "one metric that matters"? If yes, how did you arrive at it?

    • IS

      Iris Shoor

      over 2 years ago #

      The main metric for us is installations on production environment. 1). Highest correlation to sales 2). It means it’s usually a qualified user which has a production environment and is authorized to use it 3). It means the prospect trusts the product

  • DD

    Dmitry Dragilev

    over 2 years ago #

    Iris - I just blogged about your method of cold emailing to get your very first customers, see link below (search for your name when you view the article, it's a long article).

    Question for you - do you have any best recommended cold email templates you used?

    Also - What is your protocol for follow ups?

    Here is the article and cold emailing you did which I'm referring to:

    http://www.criminallyprolific.com/2015/07/10-actionable-growth-hacking-tactics-with-proven-results/

    • IS

      Iris Shoor

      over 2 years ago #

      Hi Dmitry, great post, thanks for sharing.

      Recommended cold email template - the main thing is to have it as personal as possible. I get around 5 cold emails a day, most of them are just a template and I can feel it right away. My main recommendation - give the prospect a feeling you're writing for him + keep it short and to the point.

      Follow ups - the reason I didn't write about it on the original post is that I work with developers and they are much more sensitive than other markets. I think around 3 follow ups is a good number. The first follow up I send usually just asks if they received the email. The last one can be asking them why they didn't answer so we'll be able to improve in the future.

      Good luck!

  • XZ

    xikai zhao

    over 2 years ago #

    Hey Iris,THANKS FOR doing AMA!

    I am facing a problem. Can you help?
    How to find pics from internet in email without breaking the law? I want to find a pic that fits "I challenge you" concept.

    Thank you so much

Join over 70,000 growth pros from companies like Uber, Pinterest & Twitter

Get Weekly Top Posts
High five! You’re in.
SHARE
57
57