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Andy Johns has spent his career helping startups grow. He was a product manager and internet marketer at Facebook, Twitter and Quora where he worked on growing their active user base. He was also the EIR at Greylock Partners. He's currently the Director of Growth & Revenue at Wealthfront, the largest and fastest growing automated investment manager.

He's responsible for all things related to growing their client base and assets under management. A few more specifics regarding his experience: - $10+ million in online advertising spend via multiple desktop and mobile advertising platforms - SEO lead for Facebook, Twitter and Quora - PM of email systems sending 50+ million emails / month - PM of conversion rate optimization at Twitter, Quora and Wealthfront - PM of new user onboarding and user engagement at Twitter, Quora and Wealthfront - PM of embeddable widgets/products at Facebook - Executed 400+ product A/B tests for user acquisition and retention - Led growth teams of engineers / analysts / designers ranging between 5 and 25 full-time employees.

He also acts as an Advisor to startups, incubators, and Venture Capital funds. He's a VC fund Advisor to Cowboy Ventures, Homebrew and Maven Ventures and an Advisor to ClassPass, Poshmark, Flipboard, Artillery Games, Sidecar, Curbside, Accompany, and KISSmetrics.

  • SE

    Sean Ellis

    about 2 years ago #

    Hey Andy, I've been looking forward to your AMA for a while now. Thanks so much for making the time!

    It seems that all of the most successful growth teams can trace their roots back to Facebook (Uber, Pinterest, Dropbox, Twitter...). And growth teams that don't have Facebook roots have generally been less successful. What do you think is the most important thing that teams with Facebook DNA are doing differently than the rest of us?

    • AJ

      Andy Johns

      about 2 years ago #

      My sense is that a few things are being conflated: experienced growth talent and successful companies. It may just be that the growth talent out of Facebook have solid selection abilities in terms of choosing interesting/valuable companies to join, as opposed to those folks being the primary reason why the companies they join are succeeding. I think that in a lot of cases we've chosen excellent products to work on after leaving Facebook e.g. Cat Lee joining Pinterest. Certainly, they add lots of value to those companies but it's important to note that they are joining an incredible product with a great base of organic growth. So there is some selection bias at hand (in a positive way!). For example, when I joined Twitter it was already a fantastic product. My team helped accelerate the growth further but it already had a deep foundation in organic growth because the product was exceptional.

      But I'll also say that the time I spent at Facebook was the best business education I could have asked for. I worked with very talented people that taught me how to add value within a company, how to focus on what matters, and how to deliver results. Not all companies develop talent as well as Facebook has, and still does.

      • SE

        Sean Ellis

        about 2 years ago #

        Thanks Andy. Makes a ton of sense. I agree that picking the right product is by far the most important thing. But I also really like your emphasis on focusing on what really matters.

  • CB

    Charlie Benkendorf

    about 2 years ago #

    Hey Andy, thanks for making time for this AMA! Two questions:

    1) Brian Balfour gave a great talk yesterday on building growth engine. The first thing he mentioned was modeling out the levers you can pull. What criteria do you use to know when to stop breaking down and make a decision / move forward? For example, even though my company has 1 product, we have different sales channels, different acquisition channels, different product variances (voltages), and different geos where demand is different. And then there are all the variables that drive each acquisition channel eg for SEM search imp %, average position, etc. I could see over 100 permutations / levers just for one product.

    2) Your bio mentioned you've mg'd teams between 5 & 25 FTE's. What have the team structures looked like? Curious how the scope of "growth" has varied from company to company.

    Thanks!

  • ML

    Mark Lee

    about 2 years ago #

    Hi Andy,
    I started my role as a head of growth at a b2b start-up offering software development tool kit.
    Before the current position, I was a consultant at McKinsey and leader of M&A team at national leading e-commerce outfit in Korea.
    I am new to this role (head of growth) and concerned about which skill-set I need to develop practically to serve this role well.

    What I did before was more likely to be planning and analyzing and, at the start-up here, I will conduct the substantially different role and responsibility.

    There's many expectation and pressure from team members and market. I would like to ask your advice for the person like me, whose career shifted to head of growth and completely new to him or her.

    • AJ

      Andy Johns

      about 2 years ago #

      Hi Mark! I define a head of growth as being responsible for (and excellent at) three core things:

      (1) building a simple growth model that measures and projects your growth. This can be as simple as an excel model to begin with where you identify the parameters for growth (e.g. traffic x signup rate x value per signup x etc). Then you organize people and effort around that model e.g. which parameter will you focus on improving first?

      (2) build an experimentation program where you effectively test across your product, improving key metrics along the way (this probably applies less to you on the b2b side, but perhaps not when it comes to lead funnels and lead conversion)

      (3) test and scale new customer acquisition channels

      I would focus your efforts around defining the work that needs to be done in those three categories. And actually use that framework to describe what growth is responsible for within the company. Most importantly, don't try to do everything at once. Pick one or two things to focus on and do that exceptionally well.

      • JM

        Jason Meresman

        about 2 years ago #

        @uclacademix - Thanks again for providing such great insights! From the answers you've provided here, it feels like taking a disciplined approach to growth is key. Being haphazard or ad hoc is less likely to yield results.

        • AJ

          Andy Johns

          about 2 years ago #

          You have to be highly structured. You can't approach growth as a scattershot effort. And if you're looking for a mental model on what growth is, I think of it this way -- a finance team pays attention to the flow of cash in and out of a business and understands the flow intimately. They then try to intelligently shape the flow of cash in and out. A growth team pays attention to the flow of users/customers in and out of a product. The growth team understands that better than anyone else and drives the work that shapes the flow of users in and out of the product. Hope you find that useful.

      • ML

        Mark Lee

        about 2 years ago #

        Andy thank you so much on the insight. I've experimented all three advice; developed growth model interlinked with our financial model/ performance marketing based on hypothesis/ and try new channel for customer acquisition (forum and developers' community). it really worked and we've achieved every weekly goal so far.

      • ML

        Mark Lee

        about 2 years ago #

        Now I am building Sales pipeline and generating lead for our b2b oriented product. Would you mind if I would share some progress going forward and if I seek you additional advice so on. I really appreciate your advice

    • MS

      Mari Suviste

      about 2 years ago #

      Additional question to this.

      For a beginner growth hacker, what do you think about paying a consultant or agency, that has great startup success track record to help out with specific topics? Yay or nay?

      Thanks!

      • AJ

        Andy Johns

        about 2 years ago #

        I would consider it. But wherever possible try to develop that talent internally. There's nothing like building that knowledge internally and making that part of your company DNA. I would keep the costs at a minimum though. There are so many sources of free knowledge, including this website :)

  • BA

    Ben Apel

    about 2 years ago #

    Andy you're becoming a bit of a known quantity, so congrats on the success.

    Now, channel your inner Oprah and tell me, what's on your must-read book/blog list for b2c growth?

    Favorite tools for testing user engagement?

    • AJ

      Andy Johns

      about 2 years ago #

      Ok, here goes my best inner Oprah.

      Today, everyone in the studio audience gets a free channel bag!!! *crowd goes wild*

      Wait, that's the wrong segment of the show.

      Go read Crossing the Chasm. Then read it again. And read Zero to One.

      All you need is Excel to measure engagement. Dump retention stats in there and plot out the retention curves a la Brian Balfour's methods http://www.coelevate.com/essays/product-market-fit

  • AG

    Alex Gu

    about 2 years ago #

    Hi Andy,

    Thanks for doing this!

    Peter Thiel talks about "The Power Law of distribution".

    What's the main source of acquisition of Wealthfront? How do you guys discover it?

    Thanks!

    • AJ

      Andy Johns

      about 2 years ago #

      The majority of our growth is organic. People tell other people about it because of the value Wealthfront gives them. You don't necessarily discover organic growth. But you do iterate your way towards building a product that people go crazy for. All great companies begin there. And of course you then work on developing multiple distribution channels to accelerate the organic growth. However for us today we see that whenever we built new products that fill a need for our clients, our growth accelerates. It's happened over and over again.

  • SH

    Sam House

    about 2 years ago #

    Hi Andy,

    With a site like Quora that thrives on quality content , how do you balance growth with quality and what metrics did you use to measure this?

    • AJ

      Andy Johns

      about 2 years ago #

      The truth is that you have to always focus on quality. The Silicon Valley is obsessed with exponential growth curves. Those can come at significant cost (e.g. Zynga). So I always pick the company that can maintain a reasonable rate of growth over a very long time (e.g. 10 - 20 years) than the company with 2 years of killer growth followed by 2 years of exponential decay. It took Linked in 400 days to get a million registered users and nearly 4 years to get to 10 million. By today's standards most in the tech world would look at it and say "Eh, that's pretty good. It's not Snapchat though!". But look at their growth in recent years. They had about 90 million registered users at the time of their IPO. 18 - 24 months later I think they had 200 million, and still growing! I think that's the potential for businesses like Quora that focus on quality over quantity. It's about how durable your growth is. Not about how quickly the growth happens, IMHO.

  • MR

    Matt Restivo

    about 2 years ago #

    Hey Andy! Big fan. I run product at the NHL, and we're shifting focus to growth. I've read a lot of Brian Balfour and we're implementing his process, but I'm wondering if you can help out on...

    Being a proponent of moving fast and doing Minimal Viable Tests as often as possible-- how do you do this on native mobile? Things like Optimizely's code blocks are great, but require a lot of upfront work before shipping.

    Are there tools or methods that you use to rapidly test on mobile? If so, can you dig into some detail on that?

    • AJ

      Andy Johns

      about 2 years ago #

      Unfortunately it's just not easy. Especially with iOS. It's easier to test on mobile with Android because pushing to the app store on regular releases is generally easier. Personally though I've never used an off-the-shelf a/b testing product for mobile so I can't speak to that. At the companies I've been at we built native testing tools in-house and do so server side so that you weren't depending on app store releases to test something new.

  • KG

    Kamil Goliszewski

    about 2 years ago #

    Hey Andy,

    What does a typical, average day at your work look like?

    Are there any good habits or tolls to share that help you with structuring data, tasks and team management?

    Thanks for running this AMA

    • AJ

      Andy Johns

      about 2 years ago #

      My day focuses around checklists. Read the Checklist Manifesto. So my day begins with structure. At all times I need to know what is the most important thing I could be doing right now, what do I need to do to execute on that, and what does the deliverable look like? It's not sexy by any means. But it gets the job done!

      7 Share
  • PV

    Philippe Vdhd

    about 2 years ago #

    Hi Andy,

    As a lot of people are getting on the bandwagon of growth, some people are considering it to be the holy grail of marketing and startup success.

    I was wondering which topics within growth that a lot of people ask you about piss you off the most? And why.

    • AJ

      Andy Johns

      about 2 years ago #

      haha well nothing really pisses me off. I do find some of the generalizations to be misleading. I don't particularly like the term "growth hacker" because it implies that an individual is responsible for growth of a company. That's false. Growth is an organization and a disciplined approach to iterative product development and iterative product marketing. Both areas are executed by a team including data folks, engineering, design, and internet marketing. So when people ask me "Are you a growth hacker?" my answer is "No. I work on growth. Sometimes as a product manager on growth and sometimes as an internet marketing on growth." It's like asking a VP of sales if she is a "sales hacker". She'll tell you no. But she does work on sales and helps develop a team that is very effective at delivering sales numbers.

      Growth is really just the redefinition of the Chief Marketing Officer (CMO) role that has historically been critical to brick and mortar/traditional companies. But technology companies are fundamentally distinct from brick and mortar companies. Netflix was not like Blockbuster. The way in which Netflix grew was completely different than Blockbuster. Therefore, the teams and people you need with a company like Netflix is very different than the teams and people you needed within a company like Blockbuster. That's why Growth is a "thing". A traditional CMO would not have helped Facebook reach the scale at which it now operates. But a traditional CMO may help traditional brick and mortar companies out quite a bit.

  • VK

    Victor Korelsky

    about 2 years ago #

    Hi Andy,

    Great to have someone with your experience here !
    Was wondering if you had any advice on sketching out a valuable long term growth plan (1 year ahead) with good number estimates ?

    Would help a lot !
    Thanks!

    • AJ

      Andy Johns

      about 2 years ago #

      The truth is that if you are plotting your projected growth out further than 6 months, it likely devolves into chaos theory :) That's especially true if your company is moving fast and the dynamics shaping your product, the competition, and your growth are changing quickly. Maintaining an accurate growth model and prediction is largely iterative. We edit and update our prediction models frequently. Previously I've updated growth models on a monthly basis as you receive new inputs.

      I think it's most important that you sketch out your growth flywheel i.e. what is the engine behind your growth? The engine won't give you future projections, but it will give you a core understanding of how you may have perpetual growth. For example, Quora grows by getting people to write content. For each piece of content written Quora gets more traffic. Some of that traffic converts into new signups. Some of those new signups eventually convert into becoming content writers, and the process continues.

      That's what I mean by a growth engine. Understand what that is at first.

  • AA

    Anuj Adhiya

    about 2 years ago #

    One more question, and this may come across as a bit Peter Thiel-ish, but what do believe you know that other growth people don't?

    • AJ

      Andy Johns

      about 2 years ago #

      Nothing, really. I just keep working at it and keep my focus. If I had to say I have a strength or two, I would say I can describe complex things in simple ways. And I would also say that I care a lot about building a great team, developing the talent on my team, and producing an exceptional organization.

  • SM

    Shilpa Mishra

    about 2 years ago #

    Hi Andy

    Thanks for doing this AMA!

    I'm currently with a B2B- platform (startup) , I wanted to ask you how to work on a growth plan and where to start for a platform with so many things to offer that range across different audience segment. Each segment is very different from another and without confusing them, we would like to get each to use our product.

    Thanks!

    • AJ

      Andy Johns

      about 2 years ago #

      Sounds complicated! If each product is independent and sold into a different audience, then I would focus on generalizing a sales and product marketing pipeline that can be used across all products. Then at least you have mechanisms in place for distribution of each of these products independently. But I'll cite Amazon as another leading example of the value of focus. They started by only selling books. They became excellent at selling books, building book inventory, and delivering books on a timely basis. Then they expanding into music and executed a similar playbook. I think you need to do something similar with your business. But again I don't know it well enough to give concrete suggestions here.

      • SM

        Shilpa Mishra

        about 2 years ago #

        Thanks for such an elaborate response Andy! To start with we have decided to approach the market with one segment at a time.

        To give you an idea about our platform, I work for a startup called Yaap.io a platform to democratize data science for everyone - for now our core offerings are -1) consultant like decision frameworks for business functions like Marketing, Sales etc. as an app store 2) advance statistical toolkits for ad-hoc analysis for biz analysts and data science professional.

        (PS - Sorry for this late reply. i got so engrossed in reading your AMA responses that I completely forgot to submit my response)

  • VM

    Vineel Maharaj

    about 2 years ago #

    Hi Andy,

    How would you grow a new start up entering the website builder market going against Squarespace, Wix, Weebly, & Hubspot?

    -Vin

    P.S.

    My start up is looking to be a revolutionary marketing platform for your lead capture, CRM, email campaigns, analytics, hosting beautiful websites, and much more. A one stop shop. >>> https://nikktto.com/

    Currently I'm running FB ads campaigns for lead gen and converting a % to presells.

    Any tips would be appreciated.

    • AJ

      Andy Johns

      about 2 years ago #

      First, I would figure out how to build a better product than what they have and deliver it to an early adopter portion of the market. Otherwise, you're going to have to spend a lot of money to compete and acquire customers. But it's a chicken and egg problem because unless you have great growth, you can't raise the money needed to pour into hiring and marketing. Therefore you must win on product innovation to begin with. Find an itch you can scratch that they aren't currently scratching. That could be in the form of product feature set, or in the form of a market segment e.g. maybe they don't satisfy the needs of architects very well and you can build a better website builder experience for architects? That can be the wedge you initiative. Amazon didn't start by selling every product. They started with books. Books expanding into music. And so on :)

      • CC

        Chiara Cokieng

        almost 2 years ago #

        This is a great answer for thinking through product, especially for people who worry too much about competition.

        Relating your Amazon response to Vin's question, what was "Amazon's Wix/Weebly/Squarespace?"

  • XZ

    xikai zhao

    about 2 years ago #

    Hi Andy,

    Thanks for doing this! As a fresh growth hacker with an engineering & entrepreneur background, I totally understand the importance of having a growth hacker community and learn from each other. But I am new, what would be a best way to build credibility and learn the most from the community.

    • AJ

      Andy Johns

      about 2 years ago #

      Credibility comes with doing good work, producing results, and having clear character and sense of purpose. Credibility doesn't come from telling people, "Hey, I'm credible!" :) My advice is to pick one area of expertise under the growth umbrella e.g. SEO or some other channel or skill. Become exceptional at that. Become so good at it that people assess your credibility based on your results. Then slowly pile on new fields of expertise one at a time. 10 years later you'll know a hell of a lot about this comprehensive field known as "growth". Liken it to traditional CMOs. 30 years ago the CMO for a major multinational brick and mortar or CPG likely started out learning something like print advertising or radio advertising. She probably did that for a few years. Then had the chance to try her hand at outdoor media buying. Then perhaps retail merchandising. The next thing you know, she had 10 years of experience and developed expertise across a couple of disciplines which she ultimately packaged together with executive leadership abilities into a CMO position.

      Start focused. Become an expert on a focused area. Replicate that pattern over years and you'll find yourself being an expert on a wide range of areas. I started on SEO. Then did paid marketing. Then took on email responsibilities and conversion rate testing. Then more product management responsibilities on user engagement and retention. Then did more paid marketing and email marketing. Then A LOT more a/b testing on user growth and engagement. Then I started building small teams. Small teams turned into larger teams. From that I gathered management and leadership skills. Now I get to combine all of that experience into a single role. That's how careers unfold when you give them time :)

    • XZ

      xikai zhao

      about 2 years ago #

      additional question:

      I am working on a e-commerce startup that sells sports/concert tickets. For SEO, how should I priority keywords, since there are so many teams and artists we could pick.

      • AJ

        Andy Johns

        about 2 years ago #

        Usually you have to go after the long-tail of keywords first when you don't have the sort of domain authority needed to compete with the bigger sites. Over time you can earn enough domain authority and then have a chance at competing.

  • CO

    Candace Ohm

    about 2 years ago #

    Andy, thanks for doing this!

    How would you develop a growth team at a startup that has multiple products? Would you put all data analysts on one team or would you divide data people among each product so that a data analyst owns his/her own product? Why?

    • AJ

      Andy Johns

      about 2 years ago #

      Definitely divide data analyst across functional areas / products. The reason is (1) depth of knowledge (2) priority conflicts.

      (1) You want an analyst to be focused on a particular area because they'll be more effective that way. They'll know the nuances of your data warehouse, the queries they write, and the business problems for that part of the organization much more intimately by having focus.

      (2) Imagine that the revenue team has 3 priority requests for data analysis support. The growth team also has 3 priority requests. Then another part of the product org also has 3 priority requests. Those requests are all sent into a centralized data analysis resource. How does this analyst decide the global priority amongst the 9 competing data requests. The answer is you can't without making others unhappy.

      So on growth I typically want a dedicated data analyst because she is familiar with the problems we are solving, familiar with the data sets we tend to look at, and doesn't have to figure out cross functional analysis priorities, which always ends up ugly.

  • NK

    Nicole Kroese

    about 2 years ago #

    Hey Andy,
    I manage marketing and user acquisition as a SaaS company with a social media software for SMBs and entrepreneurs. We recently launched a freemium plan and frictionless sign-up app. Upselling workflows from the free trial to our upper tier products are actually working quite well, but getting people to use the app and convert on the base plan after the free trial is not working as well. Any tips on nurturing/notifications/sign up flows to start users off on the right foot & become super users of the product? Also, what are the most tasteful and effective ways of communicating to users that their free trial is running out and they they should pay to stay on.
    Also, we have some people signing up via web & some via mobile app install. For the web sign ups, we want to get them onto the mobile app because we believe that will be where they use the product most, but so far use of the mobile app is low. Any suggestions for making the process more seamless?

    • AJ

      Andy Johns

      about 2 years ago #

      It's likely that you're dangling the wrong carrot in front of them for the base plan. It sounds like whatever value add you are giving them for an upgrade to premium is the right carrot. Or perhaps it is the right carrot for the base plan but it's value is explained poorly?

      I would start by assessing it from that perspective. From experience this is only partially solved by tightening up the notifications and up-sell systems around getting people to upgrade. The best lever you have for upgrading someone is to tier in a product that they would be heart broken over losing if they let the trial expire.

  • AB

    Akos Boros

    about 2 years ago #

    Hi Andy,

    What do you think about the importance of the typical KPIs, like downloads, registered users and website views for an early stage B2C startup? I think these numbers can be used for PR, but instead of these, even early stage startups should focus more on the smart KPIs (like Dave McClure's Pirate Metrics) like retention rate, monthly active users or the effectiveness of their referral. What do you think about this topic and according to your experiences what are the most important KPIs for an investor in this case?

    It's great that have you here and thank you very much for your answers!

  • LS

    Logan Stoneman

    about 2 years ago #

    Hey Andy! In what areas outside of business do you apply your growth mindset?

  • GH

    Grant Heimbach

    about 2 years ago #

    Hey Andy! I've been a real fan of yours for a long time. Thanks so much for taking the time to do this AMA!

    What aspect of your daily job would you say excites you the most and gets you out of the bed in the morning?

    Followup question...if you had to do anything else for a job other than growth, what would that be and why?

    Cheers!

  • DS

    Dubble0h saraway

    about 2 years ago #

    Yes I'd love to know why the US seems to have cornered the market on startups/VC to fund etc. Such Vision! UK seems to be lagging seriously behind

    • AJ

      Andy Johns

      about 2 years ago #

      This is a fascinating topic, actually. I suggest you watch this: http://www.npr.org/2012/03/26/149404846/the-birth-of-silicon-valley

      It's the compensation schedule in the Silicon Valley that largely contributed to it's growth and success, in combination with some random events. What other industries on the planet give every employee of the company some fractional ownership in the business? It's hard to think of any others. Consequently, the technology industry attracts a lot of the best workforce talent and those folks try to reimagine large industries. Venture Capital is the jet fuel behind this process.

      I chatted with a friend that works in the startup world in Berlin. She was given an offer to join a company. However that company would not comment on whether or not she was going to get equity in the company. How can you foster a thriving tech economy, that attracts the best talent, when you want to pay people as if it's a regular salaried position? I don't think you can.

  • AA

    Anuj Adhiya

    about 2 years ago #

    Hi Andy - so excited for this!

    From past or current teams, do you have a particular growth experiment that was either a big win or a big learning experience that you can share with us?

    • AJ

      Andy Johns

      about 2 years ago #

      At Twitter we had a big win in the early days. And it started with something simple. We looked at the signup form and attrition rates through signup. Turned out that username selection was a big hurdle. We tested some alternative UI's and found a version that lifted signups by nearly 70,000 new signups a day. A DAY!!!! And all of those new signups were just as "valuable" or engaged as the signups before them. It was not an artificial lift.

      The lessons were:

      (1) start with the basics. John Wooden, legendary basketball coach at UCLA that won 10 national championships, started each season by teaching all of his new players how to put their socks on. The logic was that if you put your socks on incorrectly you would get blisters. Players with blisters can't practice. If you can't practice you can't improve. If you don't improve you won't win. Growth teams teach companies how to put their socks on.

      (2) dig deeper. As we looked closer into the data we realized that signup rates were more profoundly impacted per country. That's because the signup forms poorly handled inline validation for non-Latin characters. We effectively borked signup for people in a handful of countries that no one had been thinking of. Overnight, our rate of growth increased by 2x - 3x in some countries. Amazing, right?!

  • CP

    Ching Piktochart

    about 2 years ago #

    Hi Andy,

    Thanks for the AMA.

    Would like to hear your thoughts about translating/localizing productivity apps like Mailchimp as a stepping stone to tap into unexplored markets (assuming that about 50-60% of revenue is currently generated in North America). At which stage should a startup start considering other markets?

    Thanks!

    • AJ

      Andy Johns

      about 2 years ago #

      You should consider it as soon as you're ready to make things incredibly tough and uncomfortable within the company! haha International growth is tough. You can't tap dance around it. Localize the product and open the floodgates. Get ready for a fun couple of years after that :) I guess I would flip the question on it's head. Why are you waiting?

  • MK

    Michael Kawula

    about 2 years ago #

    Hey Andy,

    Thanks for jumping in to answer these questions (this is awesome).

    I recently became CEO of a startup where our team increases the size & quality of someone's Twitter account. We've been getting great reviews and testimonials from some really awesome people.

    Over the last 3 months I've gotten traffic up on the site to over 35,000 visitors a month using Twitter and good content. Visitors who hit my signup page which is super simple are spending 3-4 minutes on that page before converting or bouncing.

    I want to offer a 14 Day Free-Trial which we haven't done yet. I've read a lot from Lincoln Murphy who I also totally respect on this topic.

    Would love your opinion on during the 14 day trial how often we should be in touch with the user?

    Based on customer feedback thus far customers are in love with the new followers quality and growth in the account, thus I feel they should be prime to convert at the end with a nice offer.

    Do you think an email every other day is to much or should we increase the number of emails as we get closer to the end of the 14 day trial?

  • JC

    Josh Caba

    about 2 years ago #

    Thanks for doing this Andy!

    If you were a brand new and completely unknown startup with no funding. What would be the most effective ways to get people to start visiting your site and gaining traction in the short-term?

  • DP

    Daniel Prol Pérez

    about 2 years ago #

    Hey Andy !

    What is a day in the life of a Growth Product Manager like?

    Many thanks to you for the way you've moved this industry forward.

  • BT

    Brad Turner

    about 2 years ago #

    Thank you for all your answers. I did some research on Wealthfront and see that you have some great design and landing pages. I came across the following personalized Andy Johns landing page www.wealthfront.com/invited/AFFC-QXFE-IOZF-Y1X1 Do you have an affiliate program that allows for partners to also have personalized landing pages and has this been a growth strategy that helped you grow from $1B to $2.5B of assets managed in such since last June.

  • DJ

    David Johnson-Igra

    about 2 years ago #

    Hey Andy,

    Thank you for taking the time to speak with us. A lot of growth techniques I've read focus on low cost, high opportunity tactics and strategies since they're scalable. This obviously makes sense, but here are my questions:

    1. What value should be placed on event marketing? (Given that startups tend to shy away from events because of the high barrier of costs, and low rewards for acquisition based on scale.)

    2. I work for a B2C business that revolves around UGC, so scale is important since our primary growth channel is direct and SEO-driven traffic. However, at what point (or size) does it become worthwhile to take a Facbeook/Yelp local, targeted marketing approach vs. general content driven marketing approach? Is there a demographic satuaration target you think should be reached before trying to heavily push in a single market?

    Thanks for your time!

  • HQ

    Hila Qu

    about 2 years ago #

    Hi Andy,

    Thanks for doing this. If you are about to start as a growth hacker for a small start up, what would you do in your 1st day, 1st week and 1st month? Another related question, which growth strategy/tactics applies to both small and bigger companies, which don't?

  • MJ

    Mitch Jones

    about 2 years ago #

    Hi Andy, thanks for your time.
    Q, I've been working away at my product for a number of years and I'm yet to locate product / market fit. My customers tell me the product is valuable to them, but I have almost zero on boarding(which I'm working on) and the re-engagement while not completely broken, is pretty low.

    Is it worth putting effort into on-boarding just to ensure that that's not the problem, or should've I expected at least a base line of organic growth and completely pivot before I spend too much more time. My instinct is that the product is broken and I'm not solving a core problem, but the effort to do the extra work work will a) teach me new skills and b) may help me discover something new about my customer's problem. Thanks for your time.

  • SA

    Soroosh Azary Marhabi

    about 2 years ago #

    Hi Andy!
    We're a startup in Iran, developing a vertical search engine for online retail stores, which are experiencing an exponential boom in number & in sales. The market has some big players, but it has no dominant player yet (like amazon), so there is room for a search engine.
    What do you think we should consider in our growth engine?
    Thanks for your time!

  • SD

    Santu dey

    about 2 years ago #

    Hi Andy,
    We are making on-demand app for entrepreneur and enterprise.
    Currently, we are getting 70% of our leads from search and retargeting ads but as the no of keywords limited. Its's difficult to move to the next step.

    What will be the next step to generate leads?

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