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Jessica is Vice President, Enterprise Marketing at InVision (invisionapp.com), a fast-growing company that offers an industry-leading design prototyping and collaboration platform. To date, InVision has raised $79m and is used by more than 1 million designers.

Prior to InVision, she held several marketing functions at HubSpot, including most recently, Head of Web Marketing, where she was responsible for managing the strategy and development of HubSpot’s web properties and apps. Prior to that she was Head of Enterprise Marketing, leading the inbound marketing, demand generation and branding strategies for HubSpot’s entry into the Mid and Enterprise market. During her time at HubSpot, the company grew from $18m to $130m+ in revenue, and from a private company through a successful IPO.

Outside of HubSpot, she is a mentor with TechStars, angel investor, and frequently advises many startups and professionals on marketing strategies and leadership. Jessica's marketing content has received more than 235,000 downloads and her work has been featured in The Atlantic and on the Today Show. 

You can follow her on twitter: @jessicameher

She will be live on Jan 28, starting 930 AM PT for one and a half hours during which she will answer as many questions as possible.

  • JM

    Jessica Meher

    4 months ago #

    Excited to chat with y'all tomorrow. Just a note...I'll be awarding my favorite question with some cool InVision swag. :)

  • AK

    Austin Knight

    4 months ago #

    Hey Jess, great to see you here!

    First off, congratulations on InVision's recent acquisition of Macaw. That's huge news and it says a lot about the vision that you all have for the tool. While InVision started as a prototyping tool, it's since evolved into a full-blown design and collaboration solution that's really focused around the designer's entire workflow. This is great because the current product design tool suite is very bloated (there are too many tools), disjointed (they don't integrate), and inefficient (designers have to do duplicate work when switching between tools and phases). I would love to eventually see a tool that can take the designer from initial ideation and collaboration, through design (wireframes, mockups, prototypes), and into code (I'm talking basic production). I know that's a pipe dream, but with Macaw coming on board, I have to ask: Is it possible? Do you all plan to have InVision start producing code (even if basic at first)? What is the InVision workflow of the future going to look like?

    On the enterprise side, it's been cool to see how InVision has swept the community, with companies like Uber, LinkedIn, Twitter, Salesforce, Adobe, and Evernote swearing by it. What has it been like to work with clients like that? How do you market to and build relationships with companies that have such high standards?

    Outside of InVision, as someone who has accomplished so much so fast in their career, what what advice would you give to a young person with dreams of becoming a VP some day? Are there any things that you feel really accelerated your professional growth?

    Thank you for doing this AMA. I'm looking forward to seeing what's in store of InVsion.

    • JM

      Jessica Meher

      4 months ago #

      1. I think you're on to us, Austin! Yes, with our acquisition of Macaw (awesome team and product btw), and with our recent announcements of Insight (http://blog.invisionapp.com/insight-ui-designers-developers-collaboration/) and Motion (http://blog.invisionapp.com/motion-prototype-animation/), InVision's vision (heh) is to break down design friction across an organization, and that means easier collaboration with developers, PMs, copywriters, stakeholders, etc. So many people and teams impact design and we hope to bring everyone together on one platform. I can't give you much detail on what's coming next, but I think you'll be excited about the future as we are.

      2. First and forecast, our customers, no matter what size the company, are amazing. They inspire us every day and we are so thankful to be in this industry. We especially love teams with high standards (or our design disruptors as we say) because they push us to be better as a company and continue to build a better and better products.

      3. Well, first, thank you. Second, I feel like I have SO much more to accomplish and I'm just getting started. I think that mindset makes a difference. My advice: it's awesome to aspire to be a VP someday (and I have no doubt that you will be) but realize a) that it's just a title, and b) don't rush to get there. Be aggressive at learning and challenging yourself, not moving up the ladder. Especially if you are young, learn like hell and soak up everything you possibly can. During my almost 5 years at HubSpot, I worked in almost every function on the marketing team and had several managers during that time (learning how to manage up is a great skill). I also found ways to work cross-department and involve myself with Product, Sales, Account Management, etc. I become obsessed with analytics and understanding the economics of the business. To me, that experience was far more valuable than worrying about being a VP by the time I'm X years old or wanting to get promoted every year. The second part is learning how to be a great manager and leader. Find ways to lead projects, or mentor a new employee, or manage an Intern, to start developing your management skills. Being genuinely helpful is an amazing way to learn and develop influence across the team. And identifying opportunities with the potential for high impact and solving for EV (Enterprise Value) is also important. And oh, ask for candid feedback regularly - which I know you are awesome at.

      At the end of the day, I continuously try to push myself to be uncomfortable and keep learning. I wish I did a better job earlier in my career, though. I use to be super afraid to take any risk. I dunno, maybe the older I get the less I care about not being perfect. Lol.

      • AA

        Anuj Adhiya

        4 months ago #

        "Maybe the older I get the less I care about not being perfect. "

        I can totally identify with the sentiment behind this - and it's liberating as hell!

      • HQ

        Hila Qu

        4 months ago #

        Can I give you some GrowthHackers swag for the answer #3? 😏

      • JM

        Jessica Meher

        4 months ago #

        *Foremost, not forecast. Obviously I have 2016 planning on the brain. *_*

      • AK

        Austin Knight

        4 months ago #

        Awesome answers - thanks for taking the time today :)

  • AH

    Agnes Haryuni

    4 months ago #

    Hi Jessica! How would you build social media audience if the company is new and have no audience/small audience in the beginning?

    • JM

      Jessica Meher

      4 months ago #

      Oh man, I could write a whole book on this question! But, I'll give you some tangible tips to start:

      1. Start being active in the 2 or so social networks where your customers are. You don't need to be on every network to start, you'll spread yourself too thin. If you're a local/small business, Facebook is great. If you target a young demographic, use Instagram or SnapChat. If you want to reach women in their 30's, get on Pinterest. It depends on your market.
      2. Share content that is valuable. Don't just talk about you or share stuff no one wants to consume.
      3. Leverage your existing customers or audience (even if small). Empower them to share your content. Have real conversations with them. Get your friends and family involved.
      4. If you're on Twitter, create an awesome Twitter profile and just start following people (preferably in your industry).

      Lastly, I'll give you a good example. I met two high school students (each 16 years old) in Boston who have their own little business customizing shoes w/ really cool designs. They have no ecommerce site or website, but they are huge users of Instagram. They gained 6,000 Instagrams followers in like 6 months from regularly posting photos of their shoe designs. I was blown away from the audience they were able to build just by being authentic and giving their audience something they enjoy.

      HubSpot has a ton of great content on this topic, here are just a few posts:
      http://offers.hubspot.com/social-media-marketing-kit
      http://blog.hubspot.com/blog/tabid/6307/bid/22363/How-to-Enhance-Your-Internet-Presence-With-Social-Media-Free-Ebook.aspx
      http://www.slideshare.net/HubSpot/5-quick-tips-for-growing-your-facebook-audience/8-INVITE_EXISTINGCONTACTS_TO_LIKEYOUR_PAGE2

      3 Share
  • RS

    Ross Simmonds

    4 months ago #

    Hey Jessica - Thanks for taking the time!

    One question: There's a lot of talk in the marketing circles that growth hacking is either (1) impossible or (2) very, very hard when it comes to the enterprise. From your perspective, what is the one thing you've learned over the years that you don't think a lot of b2b marketers realize when planning growth?

    • JM

      Jessica Meher

      4 months ago #

      Hi Ross, great question!

      Growth hacking is certainly possible in the enterprise! I don't think it's more difficult, rather, there are some differences to keep in mind (top-down vs bottom-up, arming your champion, multiple decision makers, etc). One thing I've learned? Humm, there are many but I'll try to boil it down.

      When planning for growth, focus on user and their pain points and creating content and experiences (in and outside of a product) that delight. User experience is king. I know that sounds generic, but so many marketers focus on the product and not the person. I see it over and over again. Especially in startups. This is a second point (sorry, I'm cheating), but be very data-driven. Develop a system of measurement and testing and experimentation. Know the 2 or 3 (max) KPIs are that critical to the business and be relentless on improving those. And re-evaluate your goals every 6 months or so to make sure those are current with what's important. Brian Balfour has an amazing system for growth and super duper valuable content I'd recommend reading (http://www.coelevate.com/).

      8 Share
      • RS

        Ross Simmonds

        4 months ago #

        Appreciate the response, this makes lots of sense. I think the entire GH community will benefit from this AMA. Thanks for the time!

  • GF

    Guillermo Fernández

    4 months ago #

    Hi Jessica, Great to have you with us!

    I am lately a great fan of your B2B marketing efforts. It´s clear that you have deeply understood who is your client and pretty well what is their minds.

    I have 2 questions for you : )

    - I am going to record some brands talking about their experiences working with us (digital business agency). Any advice on good video-testimonials questions or recording-places?

    - What opportunities do you see in B2B marketing through Linkedin?

    Thank you and greetings from Europe!

    • JM

      Jessica Meher

      4 months ago #

      Hello! Thanks for the question.

      1. In terms of case study questions, letting the customer tell their story naturally as if you're having a conversion is great. But to get things started, asking about their background, challenges they've experienced, what led them to your business, and what they've experienced thus far, any results generated, and some forward-thinking thoughts are a great start. For recording places, I'd recommend the client's office or picking a setting that has a cool backdrop (like a Library, impressive office building or public spaces). I might be biased, but InVision has some amazing video testimonials (see some on our site: http://www.invisionapp.com/). We record them all at the customer's offices. Hope that answers your question!

      2. I love LinkedIn for B2B marketing. Being active in groups by having great conversations (not posting spam) and posting though-leadership blog posts has been effective. Advertising has been less effective for me personally, but it all depends on your audience and the quality of the offer you are promoting. A possible opportunity: SlideShare. I LOVE creating SlideShare presentations (after all, content is becoming more visual). And now that LinkedIn owns SlideShare, you can embed them in LinkedIn blog posts and get more viewers.

      5 Share
      • EF

        Eric Fleming

        4 months ago #

        I love that idea about getting creative on Slideshare! We actually launched our agency with a children's book (that was actually a power point deck) and generated a whole bunch of initial inbound interest when we didn't have a single client yet. It'd been a couple of years now, but we're still super proud of Jenny and her chicken friend :-) http://www.slideshare.net/mashstudionyc/jenny-and-the-chicken

  • HQ

    Hila Qu

    4 months ago #

    Hi Jessica,

    Super excited to have you here.

    My question is:

    I often notice that many highly productive and successful people are those who are able to connect the dots between different pieces of a puzzle. Have you come across any strategies/principles that you learned at work that you also apply to your life?

    • JM

      Jessica Meher

      4 months ago #

      Hi Hila,

      Excited to have you here, too!

      Seeing patterns and trends is a very valuable skill. There isn't one secret to being good at it, but keeping a look out for those patterns and opportunities and learning as much as you can about a business and the industry is a great place to start. I read a ton and ask a lot of questions and from that you can start to see the bigger picture of things. Applies in work and life.

      • HQ

        Hila Qu

        4 months ago #

        Very well said, echoed something I learned from a wise person just yesterday "I'm not an expert, I just think about this way more than you."

  • CP

    Christa Pusateri

    4 months ago #

    I have two:
    1. Boring question first: Do you know of any good ways to dynamically and easily update software user manuals online for free or cost effective SaaS pricing?
    2. What's the most interesting thing about you?

    • JM

      Jessica Meher

      4 months ago #

      1. Humm, I don't. I'm sure I've been a user of these tools but don't know any off the top of my head!

      2. Hah. Well. Let me think.....I don't know if this is interesting, but when I tell people this, they don't expect it: I've always wanted to race street bikes and once owned a Kawasaki Ninja. I love speed and I'm super competitive. I also won the most number of pushups - including men and women - during a physical training challenge once...64 pushups/minute. I can probably only do half that now, hah.

      3 Share
      • CP

        Christa Pusateri

        4 months ago #

        Wow! That's impressive on the push-ups. I would be happy to do more than one real one :) Thanks for sharing!

  • PM

    Phill Moorman

    4 months ago #

    Hey Jessica, thanks for taking the time to answer our questions.

    My questions are:

    1) On a distributed team, like InVision, how do you manage the marketing idea process? Do you use any tools to help visualize the idea and plan of action?

    2) What's your #1 tip for someone looking to jump into the growth game?

    • JM

      Jessica Meher

      4 months ago #

      1. So a few things here. The marketing team has weekly standups and we do a lot of brainstorming there as well with our individual, smaller teams. We use InVision's Boards feature for putting together ideas visually (here's one we just published: https://dribbble.com/shots/2484903-Design-Visual-Brand). And we use gdocs (and soon, a wiki) to share plans and processes and priorities. We use Aha! as our project management tool to organize everything we work on and our backlog. And so many great ideas and resources end up in Slack. We are huge Slack users.

      2. Get comfortable with data and analytics. Measure everything. Learn to love pivot tables and excel. Or SQL or reporting tools. Growth is a numbers game. :)

      3 Share
      • PM

        Phill Moorman

        4 months ago #

        Aha! Looks really cool I'm going to check that out. Lots of great info. thank you so much!

        Do you (or someone on your team) use languages like R and Python to pull data from SQL databases?

  • SE

    Sean Ellis

    4 months ago #

    Hi Jessica, super excited for your AMA! My question is how much focus do you guys put on "expand" relative to "land" in your customer accounts and what do you do specifically to enhance "expand"? Invision is the first design solution I've seen that goes from a couple of people in the company working on design to pulling in a much larger group. I assume that hasn't been accidental :)

    • JM

      Jessica Meher

      4 months ago #

      Hi Sean, thanks for your question!

      That's correct, not an accident ;)

      As a SaaS business, it's important to focus on both. Net new accounts and retention is key, and having more users adopt a product helps it become more "sticky." Just think Salesforce. Or Workday. What's great about InVision is that we make it super easy for people to get into the product and use the product right away. We don't have a lot of limitations for free users. This makes it easy for champions to fall in love with it and to invite more users into the product, or start sharing projects with others throughout an organization. We want to make sure we remove friction where possible to allow that expansion to happen organically. That's not to say we arent proactive about land & expand as well. We have an incredible Customer Success Team who works closely with customers on adoption, let's say, to other departments, divisions, or locations. Part of that involves a lot of training and onboarding support.

      5 Share
  • AP

    Avi Posluns

    5 months ago #

    Super psyched for this!

  • AC

    Abhijith C

    4 months ago #

    HI Jessica Meher. Great to have you here!

    Iv'e got to say InVision is a company i truly respect. You have continuously added new features & iterated InVision to keep making it better everytime.
    My question is What infroms product decisions most of the time? I am sure you spend a lot of time understanding your clients' requirements, how does this feedback translate into awesome innovative features that everyone loves?

    • JM

      Jessica Meher

      4 months ago #

      That's great to hear, thanks! Love hearing from happy InVision users :)

      Many things inform our product roadmap. We get A LOT of feedback from our customers. We meet with them regularly to learn about how they are using it (or not using it, in certain areas), and what their challenges are. If we can, we go to their office on-site and learn in their environment. We analyze support tickets and bucket them based on limitations or product features. We also do user testing and lots of prototyping, of course. And we have a secret weapon: our CEO. Clark is a genius when it comes to the vision for the product and seeing the future and he understands the customer better than anyone. The ideas he comes up with constantly amaze me.

      2 Share
  • ES

    Edward Stephens

    4 months ago #

    Hey Jessica,

    Awesome to have you on here - so here's my moonshot for the InVision Swag........and general curiosity (my mum's an artist and my dad's an engineer so UX is something I hold dear)!

    1) As apps like InVision and Canva begin to collect huge amounts of data on design, color theory, templating what does the future hold for algorithmically led/supported design and what do you envision to be possible?

    2)Will we see a new era of designs and layouts hyper-personalized and reconfigured to the user?

    3) Finally, have you discovered any immutable design laws (at InVision) that simply are the 'most efficient' layout e.g. Stumble Upon's mobile share button (sweeping thumb layout).

    Can't wait to hear from you psyched for this AMA!

    • JM

      Jessica Meher

      4 months ago #

      Hi Edward! Thanks for your questions, these are great.

      1. I'm a big fan of data-driven design (and Canva, love it). I think we're only beginning to leverage the data we collect, but I imagine it will enable us to design faster and with more precision, ultimately requiring a user to think less about what to do next. And maybe to create designs that are more effective. I hope, though, that design stays human. Sometimes no amount of data can tell us how people think and feel and what emotions they experience in the moment.

      2. Yes. Personalization is HUGE and so many apps/websites/etc are already doing this.

      3. There's a lot of research out there on what works best, what color buttons get the most clicks, what kind of navigations work best, what layouts are better on the eye, etc. We don't use anything internally, our secret weapons are experimentation, user testing, and even going against best practices to stay innovative.

      • BW

        Brand Winnie

        4 months ago #

        "and even going against best practices to stay innovative."

        - Love that. So important in design and not enough people do this.

  • TM

    Ty Magnin

    4 months ago #

    Jessica - good to see you here :)

    I know you're focused on enterprise right now at InVision. I wonder, how might a growth marketing strategy for the enterprise differ in process than that of a more standard B2B strategy (if at all)?

    • JM

      Jessica Meher

      4 months ago #

      Hi Ty!

      I wouldn't say it's much different. Demand generation and product adoption is important for SMB and Enterprise and I look at the funnels very similarly. There are some areas I have to pay more attention to, like marketing to named accounts and not just users, providing different content for different users and decision makers, and investing more in field marketing and sales enablement.

      2 Share
  • JM

    Jason Meresman

    4 months ago #

    Hi Jessica - great to have you on today's AMA!

    How has the role of the sales team changed for SaaS products? It feels like more and more SaaS companies are moving towards no/low touch sales. Does InVision employ a sales team? If so, when do they get involved in the sales cycle?

    • JM

      Jessica Meher

      4 months ago #

      I'm really loving this questions!

      InVision does have an inside sales team but we don't require someone to go through sales to buy the product, or use the free version. That's the no-touch part and one of the reasons we have 1 million+ users. Our sales team gets involved typically in Enterprise accounts, because larger organizations have more requirements or we can work with them expanding adoption of the product internally. Or, people from any size company sometimes have questions and we are there to answer them! I think of our sales team more like consultants and less like sales people, they are very knowledgable about design and provide a lot of education and support.

      3 Share
  • JM

    Jessica Meher

    4 months ago #

    1. Really enjoying this AMA! I have to sign off for now (almost forgot I need to get back to work), but I will get to the remaining questions soon.

    2. It's MY turn to ask a question! What did you think of this AMA? Hope I provided some helpful answers but always looking to get better.

    • HQ

      Hila Qu

      4 months ago #

      Hi Jessica, really enjoyed this AMA, in addition to those great marketing insights, you are a great story teller, love them and please share more!

    • ES

      Edward Stephens

      4 months ago #

      I think will speak on behalf of the whole GH community and will say the AMA was boss.

      Enthusiasm, personality and perspective in - really inspired over here in the UK!

    • AA

      Anuj Adhiya

      4 months ago #

      You've no doubt already seen some of the tweets by folks who asked questions as to how they felt :).

      From my perspective, if anything this AMA gave me a really great indication of what it might be like to work with you on your team and the massive amount of learning that'd be in store for me on a daily basis.

  • CP

    Chris Powers

    4 months ago #

    Hello Jessica,

    Thanks for taking the time to do this AMA.

    If you had to start all over again in the growth space with no experience, what are some of the things you would be doing to rise to the top again? I am an aspiring growth hacker who wants to use my mental energy to promote companies with a positive environmental impact. =)

    Best from Chicago,
    -Chris

    • JM

      Jessica Meher

      4 months ago #

      Hi Chris from Chicago :)

      Question question. There's not a lot I would change, I really value the journey thus far. But for me personally, I wish I had taken more risks and been less afraid to fail earlier in my career, and still to this day. I also wish I networked more (I am quite the introvert).

      One thing that was critical for me to being a growth marketer is that I forced myself to strengthen my left brain. I come from the creative side and went to an art school my first year of college. I hated math, and data analysis did not excite me. But then I got hooked on seeing the results of my marketing and experiments, and I wanted to track everything I did. If anything, I probably would adopt that mentality even more so and become more of a data scientist. It kinda frustrates me when I can't pull data on my own and I need an analyst or operations person to do it!

      3 Share
      • AA

        Anuj Adhiya

        4 months ago #

        "I also wish I networked more"
        Again - this hits home with me a lot because I'm an introvert too.
        Took me 14+ years of being in Boston to finally realize that maybe this is something I should do more of, with the local startup community (and it's such a great community!) - everyone has something to offer!

      • CP

        Chris Powers

        4 months ago #

        Thanks Jessica,

        I appreciate the thoughtful response. I am at a point in my career where I am looking to take on more risks. After hearing this my plan is to start helping local organizations and companies I am interested in to grow, If it works, there will be significant up-side, if not, I'll learn a lot.

        I am an engineer by training and an aspiring marketer by passion - so I have the systems / analysis mindset pretty well engrained.

        Taking your advice to heart. Thanks again for sharing.

  • AA

    Anuj Adhiya

    4 months ago #

    Hey Jessica
    Thanks for taking the time to do this!

    Was there anything that you'd learned from your HubSpot experience in terms of learnings/processes/tools that you applied in your role at InVision that:
    a. has worked as well/better than it did earlier
    b. did not work as well - and in this scenario, why do you think that was the case?

  • AL

    Arsene Lavaux

    4 months ago #

    こんにちは Jessica,

    Great to see that you are coaching leadership at Babson College on top of sharing your growth leadership with this amazing community.

    1) What core trait of personality are you looking for in the next generation of leaders in the martech era?

    2) If you could only use one channel to hack growth at a B2B SaaS cloud/mobile startup, which one would it be and why?

    ありがとうございます

    • JM

      Jessica Meher

      4 months ago #

      Konnichiwa!

      1. Great question! So if we're just talking personality and not skills, the best leaders are transparent, humble and empathetic. No one wants to work for a jerk. But I'd say that about all industries, not just martech. In terms of skillsets: very data-driven/analytical plus creative and innovative. Holding yourself accountable to performance and growth. Being very customer-centric, also super important.

      2. One channel?! That's so anti-marketing, lol. That all depends on the market but I would probably use the product as the channel and focus on virality. If I had to pick a channel outside the product, and I know this will probably sound old school, but I'd use email. But again, depends on the market.

      3 Share
      • AL

        Arsene Lavaux

        4 months ago #

        Arigato! ;)

        Thank you Jessica for these great answers. I particularly like your take on 2. It makes a lot of sense.

  • SW

    Shayna Wilczynski

    4 months ago #

    Infographics and cheatsheets have become very popular, what are some ways to optimize these into qualified leads on different channels?

    On a particular a cheatsheet my company published in mid-December has over 1k shares on LinkedIn, 600 on Facebook and thousands on Twitter, how can I capture these leads besides CTA subscribing to our blog?

    • JM

      Jessica Meher

      4 months ago #

      Resources that make people's lives or jobs easier are great - cheatsheets, templates, infographics, all the like. Glad you are creating them!

      If this cheatsheet is valuable, you should try gating that behind a lead-gen form on a dedicated landing page (kinda like this: http://offers.hubspot.com/email-workflows-and-cheat-sheet-for-ecommerce-marketers). Or, if you're giving it away, link to another great resource as part of the cheatsheet that brings people to a gated offer.

      To give you an idea, I posted this Slideshare awhile ago: http://www.slideshare.net/HubSpot/10-deadly-reasons-most-websites-fail-26107473. Slideshares typically dont generate a lot of leads on their own, but what you'll notice is that I included relevant CTAs throughout the presentation linking back to other lead-gen content offers on our website (one starts on slide 18). This slideshare became one of our most successful slideshares for referring leads.

      Infographics aren't really good lead-gen material, but they are great for promotion and getting people to share your content.

      What it comes down to is, "is this offer valuable enough for someone to fill out a form" The value of the content should be greater than the email they're giving you.

      Hope that helps!

  • BW

    Brand Winnie

    4 months ago #

    Hey Jessica,

    Thanks for doing this AMA! I've been using Invision for awhile now so it's fun to have someone on who is so close to the product. Here are my questions:

    1 - I noticed the recent acquisition of Macaw (software that allows you to design while it writes the code). Also the somewhat recent launch of 'boards' for gathering inspiration. Does Invision want to become the designer's entire workflow for all things design? If so, what is the strategy behind keeping the core product relevant with existing users while continuing to be add new features?

    2 - What's the one thing you believe in when it comes to marketing that (you think) no one else believes?

    Thanks!

    • JM

      Jessica Meher

      4 months ago #

      Hi Brand,

      Somehow I missed your question, sorry! Guess I'm saving the best for last ;)

      1. Yes! InVision aims to be the collaboration & workflow platform for designers. I speak to this and our strategy a bit in my answer to Austin above.

      2. Great question! I've been thinking hard about this one, and it's difficult to say. I mean, I know I've had several disagreements with folks over the years. Healthy debates are good! But I tend to play devils advocate a lot with my beliefs and see things from other people's perspectives (I'm a Libra, so I tend to be balanced and fair, which also makes me incredibly indecisive sometimes!). Next time something comes up, I will write it down.

      But hey, here's a silly one, and it's not that people don't believe in this so much as how strongly I believe in it...I wish marketers would stop using the term "blast" when it comes to email marketing or marketing in general. Like, "let's blast them with this message," or "let's send an email blast." I don't know where that usage came from, but no one wants to be "blasted." It sounds very spray and pray and offensive, honestly, versus personalized, relevant, timely, and valuable, which is what all marketing should be.

      Great work on GrowthHackers, btw!

  • CJ

    Clair Jones

    4 months ago #

    Jessica,

    Any advice you have for a young marketer setting out to gain some free-lance experience? Thanks so much! Very excited to read all your answers today!

    • JM

      Jessica Meher

      4 months ago #

      Hi Clair!

      You may not like this answer, but working for free is a great way to build your experience and portfolio. Non-profits and small businesses work kill for some pro-bono marketing help. Participating in online creative marketplaces can also work, like CrowdSpring (and I forget the name of the other big one). I use to submit work to those a lot. And even though my designs were picked as the winner, they were great for portfolio building!

      If you already have a portfolio, you may want to narrow down to an industry or sector you'd like to work in, or a type of freelancing you'd like to specialize in. For example, if you're a designer, what type of design would you like to do more of? Designing wedding invitations vs UI design, for example, are very different. If writing, long-form lead gen content is different from short-form microcopy or advertising copy. B2B vs B2C, also different. Your portfolio is what sells you, so building that and making it super strong is important.

      4 Share
      • CP

        Chris Powers

        4 months ago #

        Thanks for sharing this one too - In addition to your other advice I'll start putting together a marketing portfolio too.

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